Search Results for: Acknowledge

SCnSP – Bums on Seats

♦♦  CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Feb 2018
     

Bums on Seats

getting bums on seats at the right safety training does affect the bottom line positively

The Bottom Line

     

I’ve been thinking lately about the eternal question of the ROI (Return On Investment) for safety and safety projects in particular. My conclusion is that there is no direct ROI for safety. What one can expect is a reduction in incidents, resulting in a lowering of costs in terms of losses (medical and damages). Most industries and organisations use the rear-view-mirror approach to determine the ROI for safety projects using injuries, lives lost (fatalities) and, often, loss of reputation (safety record) as criteria.

However, the bottom line impact is not any of the above, but culture. Safety is part of the overall culture of an industry or organisation. Safety is not a stand-alone entity. Safety means doing things in a safe manner, doing it right, first time and every time, avoiding injury, loss and waste. Safety means engagement, it means ownership of the process, rules, operation and controls, amongst others. You cannot get safety right without rubbing off on other aspects of culture, like behaviours, teamwork, problem-solving, a bias towards action, productivity, quality and so on. That is why the real ROI for safety is its impact on the bottom line.

There are many ways in which the culture in an organisation is established. Leadership visibility, by living out the vision and values, especially in terms of safety, is one of the most important. Another one is education and training and, therefore, empowerment. It is imperative to get bums on seats, especially with safety training and, again, here leadership support is imperative.

At Disruptive Safety, we focus on the frontline to influence the culture, by educating and empowering H&S Reps in terms of safety.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Dr Cathy Key, for inspiring this safety tip by her use of the line “Getting Bums on Seats, the Bottom Line”.
[www.confmanager.com]

ESSENTIAL LINKS

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The Safety Rep’s Survival Guide  –  what it is and why you need it

Let me help your staff reflect upon, recommit to and be responsible for championing your safety culture.

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SCnSP – Rework Your Safety Approach

♦♦  CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Feb 2018
     

Re‘-Work Your Safety Approach

Including your H&S Rep Training

Empowered Safety Rep

     

Let’s re-examine the real reason why safety is important.

We want our employees to return home to reunite with their families, every day. We want our assets and plants to remain in a safe and productive state. We want to re-use our resources and be relentless in reducing waste and effluent. Our operations need to be refined to reach the goal of reliably producing environment-friendly products.

Often, one of the causes of problems with safety is that we repeat old mistakes, over and over and over again. We need to recollect and learn from the past. One of the ways to do this is by conducting managerial reviews as part of our management system and standards.

The ‘RE‘ words

These are really important for safety because they’re action words and safety is not a once-off exercise.

RETURN  to the basics of safety.
REDISCOVER  the power of people – driven by a safety vision.
REQUEST  involvement and participation by all in safety.
REVIEW  your safety approach – reactive or proactive?
RECONSIDER  your safety recipe – approach.
RENEW  your safety systems and approach.
REFRESH  your approach – no papers, posters and pamphlets.
REINVENT  how you engage your people in safety.
REFLECT  on your attitude towards safety.
RECOGNISE  safe  behaviour and results.
REINFORCE  safe behaviour.
REWARD  Disruptive Safety[1] – better, faster, cheaper, safer.
RECHARGE  your safety efforts – our safety batteries are limited.
RETHINK  the repercussions of taking chances.
RECALL  incidents and remind employees of the consequences.
REVISE and REWRITE  your procedures to include safety.
RE-EXAMINE  what is preventing safety success.
REMOVE  causes of / reasons for unsafe behaviour.
RECTIFY  unsafe conditions promptly.
REPAIR  broken or damaged equipment or assets.
RESTORE  safety equipment and devices.
REPRIMAND  reckless behaviour.

Note

The word REACT is not in the above list because that is the most important behaviour / action to avoid in safety. A reactive approach focuses on compliance and corrective action only, rather than on prevention and doing the right things.
Also note that the words REVIEW, RECONSIDER, RENEW and REFRESH are all key to Disruptive Safety™ and that is why we have created The Safety Rep’s Survival Guide and are running in-house workshops.

Picture: Disruptive safety call to action icon

Ask yourself and your team:

Are you giving your internal customers (company employees) what they need or ordered, or are you merely flogging them stuff you think they should have or do, i.e. things they didn’t ask for, don’t understand or accept, can’t use and don’t value?

Don’t brush this off. This is a critical question if you want to get buy-in from the people you serve. It’s easy to assume that co-workers / employees don’t know what’s required in order to keep them safe. How do you know what it is that they do or don’t know if you haven’t asked them?

Listen and respect the input from those who ‘push the buttons and use the tools’. Accept their recommendations and legalise their actions = make them safe. This is where your H&S Reps play a critical role, provided they have been properly educated and empowered.

[1]   Disruptive Safety™ promotes a futuristic approach to safety which shifts the safety paradigm from ‘Preventing wrong’ to ‘Ensuring right’. Read more

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Nigel Risner, my international professional speaking colleague, who granted me permission to adapt the ‘RE’ concept for purposes of this safety tip.
[www.nigelrisner.com]

ESSENTIAL LINKS

Icon: Jurgen-Antzi with a mike

Let me help your staff reflect upon, recommit to and be responsible for championing your safety culture.

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SCnSP – Your Call Is Important To Me

♦♦  SAFETY CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Mar 2016

Phone etiquette is key to customer relations and, with the proliferation of ACD & IVR switchboards and mobile phones, it has evolved.  Has your corporate culture kept pace?

     

YOUR CALL IS IMPORTANT TO ME

(Mobile) Connectivity

graphic depicting caller on the phone

     

The number you have called is not available. Please try again later.

I can’t take your call right now, I’m in a meeting.

I’m not available at the moment, but please leave your name and number, and I will call you back, as soon as possible!

My personal favourite: “Your call is important to us. Please hold for the next available consultant“, followed by Beethoven’s 9th Symphony alternating with advertising / information messages … over and over and over again.

And let’s not forget this important message: “For Quality and Training purposes your call may be recorded“. For heavens’ sake … If quality was important to them they would answer my darned call and not put me in a queue for ages! [1]

I’ve heard these and similar voice messages a hundred times, or more, and every time I asked myself: Really? Is the client really important to you? Are you really not available, or just in another meeting? Or is it just a question of you being unable to prioritise the urgent and important stuff?

Recently, for one of my projects, I tried to contact about 30 people. I say ‘tried’ because 80% of them couldn’t be reached on their mobile number and either don’t listen to their voicemail or don’t return calls. Why are we sitting with this endemic corporate sickness?

At one stage, I used to say to myself (as I’m sure many still do): “I am busy, if YOUR call is important to YOU, then you can call ME back!” That changed radically when I became self-employed. Every missed call is now, for me, a missed opportunity. Even when I am in a meeting, I will take a call from my wife, Heidi.

One of the reasons for carrying a mobile phone is instant connectivity. Even if circumstances dictate that you can’t immediately take a call (driving is a good example), you should still acknowledge the call by phoning the person back later.

ACTION

  1. Listen to your own message. What is it telling others about you, or your company? Turn the tables and try to see it from the caller’s perspective.
  2. Ask yourself: If I were self-employed, how would I deal with my phone calls? “Call back later” may be interpreted to mean that you are not interested, potentially losing you a business opportunity.
  3. Don’t use an auto responder unless you absolutely have to. Acknowledge the call. This doesn’t mean you have to take the call and enter into a long conversation. It means taking the initiative by offering to phone back or asking the caller to phone you at a certain time.
  4. Don’t use a term like ‘as soon as possible’. Make it a habit to follow up on missed calls and call-backs daily.
  5. Look at the 80/20 rule. 80% of people who call you on a regular basis probably need an urgent decision or want to share information with you. Ask yourself why? Has it got something to do with the way you manage and empower people? It’s your call!

[1]    Rod Jones, of Contact Centre Consulting CC

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GM – S-T-R-E-T-C-H-E-D   THIN

♦♦  SAFETY CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Jan 2016
 

S-T-R-E-T-C-H-E-D  THIN

(not a recommended diet plan)

 

I feel thin, sort of stretched, like butter scraped over too much bread.
— Bilbo Baggins in “The Fellowship of the Ring” by J.R.R. Tolkien
graphic depicting butter being spread on slice of bread

Many people and companies are feeling s-t-r-e-t-c-h-e-d going into 2016. Many are aware that they have to revise what they do and how they do it. Perfect timing – it’s a new year!

A new year is a bit like a new day … it’s an opportunity to start fresh, to apply what has been learnt from experience, to correct mistakes, to be a better version of oneself, to do things in a better way.

The realisation or acknowledgement that one has the opportunity to “start anew” is energising. But it requires some thought. Does one need a “new start”? Why? What will one do differently? Is it better and will it give one the desired results? What steps must be taken?

As I’m sure you’ve noticed by now, I am often inspired by Seth Godin’s posts and how they frequently underline my thinking on safety. In his post entitled  Is it too little butter, or too much bread? [1],  Seth reflects on resources, or rather, a perceived shortage thereof.

“Insufficient resources to get a job done / completed” – it unfailingly features in the Top 10 Excuses List.  But it needn’t, if you’re smart about what you do with the “safety butter” you have.

As Seth says: “… doing a great job with what we’ve got is the single best way to get a chance to do an even better job with more, next time.” [1]

Having to make do with less engenders creativity.
But you don’t even have to get creative.
Just G-R-O-W your SHE Reps.

Instead of getting more safety professionals to do more audits, create more paperwork, write more reports and procedures … enable your existing people to become active Safety Representatives.

So, if you’re feeling s-t-r-e-t-c-h-e-d, make the most of what you have.
As a leader, make it your underlying goal for 2016 to equip your people to do the best job they can.
As a SHE Rep, make it your underlying goal for 2016 to equip yourself to do the best job you can.

I wish you a productive and successful 2016.
May you G-R-O-W into your dreams and goals.

[1]    “Is it too little butter, or too much bread?

A NEW YEAR’S GIFT FOR YOU

photo of tent calendar for 2016 courtesy of Jurgen Tietz

Download this printable 2016 tent calendar, with my compliments.

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SCnSP – Ukuhlanya

♦♦♦  SAFETY CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦♦

In this series, I share with you my thoughts on Why Safety Is An Issue For Most Companies and the Things We Must Address If We Want To Improve Our Safety Performance. It’s time to tackle the  safety dilemma / paradox  of our times with a  disruptive approach to safety.

UKUHLANYA[1]

(Safety Paradox and Disruptive Safety)

How do you review your Safety Plan?

Let me give you some essential background before I suggest the actions.

It started when I realised that, for most of our plans, it is a case of insanity i.e. doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result[2].

Expectations have changed drastically, both for employers and employees. Employers expect more skills and competencies and at the same time more engagement and contribution from employees. Employees want more freedom in how they fulfil those expectations. It’s time to “acknowledge that the old method of productivity, of being a good employee by obediently doing what you are told, is obsolete. Our job is to figure out what’s next and to bring the ideas and resources to the table to make it happen.”[3]

graphic depicting lack of einspruchsrecht i.e. consultation

In addition, people have a much shorter attention span in these times of hashtags, selfies, iPhones and iPads. We have distorted the priority scale with the habit of responding immediately to the ring / tweet / vibration of the hand-held device. We have developed an attitude of “I want it and I want it now!” and people’s behaviour has changed accordingly. People are tired of posters, pamphlets and papers. The old systems of toolbox talks, presentations and preaching procedures no longer work that well. There is a new generation of employees who demand “einspruchsrecht”[4] and full engagement.

The Safety Dilemma.

In this age of disruptive change, we have to do things better, faster, cheaper and safer or risk going out of business. We have to have people on board who think and create safety improvements. We have to let them experiment – try it, fix it and make it work. We have to make information-enabling technology available so as to free them up to do what they do best, like thinking, creating, etc. The technology must engender independence not dependence, dependence being when you get what I call the “auto pilot syndrome” = pilots who can no longer fly themselves out of an emergency.

At the same time, we want people to manage the risks and to not take chances. We want people to look-to-see and listen-to-hear. So, we have to enforce our cardinal or lifesaving rules and, in the process, pile on a myriad of procedures, instructions and standards. For example, to avoid traffic accidents, keep to the left, drive a road worthy vehicle, be a competent, licensed driver and obey the road signs are non-negotiable!

Ultimately, for most, safety becomes a compliance issue: measure injury rates, deviations from procedures, near ‘misses’, non-compliant behaviour, etc. When the fear-based compliance manifests, we are unhappy. We want people to do the right thing because it is the safe thing to do, not because they’re going to be caught and / or fined.

We want to keep it safe and simple but we still need to be in control. It is a tough balance to strike.

Control contains a peculiar paradox.
The more you impose control, the less control you have,
because it removes accountability from someone who should own the responsibility in the first place
.”[5]

The Safety Plan.

In most organizations, there is a fear of failure and thus things take too long, changes are analysed to death, projects are too intimidating and the approval levels are far too high up the hierarchy. The end result is that people get ‘busy’ with activities like meetings, investigations, proposals, etc. which do not actually produce an outcome. At the end of the day, the “big change” project on the safety plan just gets stuck – the ‘elephant’ cannot move, despite the best efforts of the ‘rider’. The ‘path’ becomes muddied.[6]

To get around this, we need to shrink the changes into smaller, bite sizes and rally the herd to drive safety forward. If we can invent, launch and complete projects in days, instead of weeks or months, its way more likely that these projects will be more relevant at the plant / team level.

If you want your employees to get enthusiastic about safety, give them something ‘they can take home’ and be proud of = something they accomplished. One hundred small projects, completed at this level, are worth much more than one big project battling to get traction.

ACTION

  • Instead of a grand revision of your safety improvement plan, go for a  Just Do Something SAFE™[7]  safety culture. Get your teams / plants to create their own safety projects. Carry out campaigns themed on “any cause, anytime, anywhere” that are safety-related, within their means and can be completed within days.
    I am not going to give you a template or a hundred examples, as that defeats the object of you owning this disruptive safety approach. I will, however, share with you a few trigger ideas: paint the workshop floor, erect a handrail, review and renew safety signs, clean out the store room, spring clean ‘my own work space’ week.
    Your challenge is to rally the herd using suitable encouragement and recognition.
  • If the above approach is too disruptive for you, then review your safety plan, but do not use the “Moses Approach”.[8]
    Consult your key stakeholders in safety, including SHE Reps, at their place of work – a kind of “Road Hear” (not “Show”) or “lekgotla”. Get them to tell you about their safety expectations, key safety issues, any quick hits and what they want to see happen. These sessions should be facilitated by a skilled, independent person and the outcome should be communicated back to all stakeholders, within a week or two.

ps. I am able and willing to facilitate either of these actions for you and to share some tools and techniques to manage the process. (T&C’S apply)

REFERENCE

[1]   “Ukuhlanya” = “insanity” in isiZulu

[2]   Albert Einstein, German physicist (1879-1955)

[3]   Seth Godin – sundry, thought-provoking posts

[4]   “Einspruchsrecht” = “the right of people to partake in decisions which affect them”, a German expression

[5]   “Beyond Management”, by Etsko Schuitema

[6]   Analogy from “Switch”, by Chip and Dan Heath

[7]   Spring-boarding on DoSomething, which is a stellar success, a fast-growing non-profit that’s engaging with millions of young people around the world.

[8]   “Moses Approach” = where leaders huddle together in the boardroom to work out the new vision, strategy, plan or some other directive, based on assumptions, and which they expect the troops to eagerly embrace without having been consulted about what is actually required.

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SCnSP – Manslaughter or Murder?

♦♦♦     SAFETY CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE     ♦♦♦

In this series, I share with you my thoughts on Why Safety Is An Issue For Most Companies. One of the Things We Must Address If We Want To Improve Our Safety Performance is to examine our behaviour when driving and working and be ruthlessly honest about our true concern for the safety, not only of ourselves, but those around us.

Manslaughter or Murder?

I am not talking here about the Oscar Pistorius trial or pre-judging the case with a guilty or not guilty verdict.

I am talking about using a cell phone!

Talking and texting (SMS) on a cell phone, while operating a machine, plant or equipment, like cranes, trains and planes, or while driving vehicles, is a major safety hazard. Just imagine being the cause of a fatal accident as a direct result of talking or texting on a cell phone. An astute prosecuting attorney would argue that keeping your cell phone on while driving constitutes intent and that hence you would be guilty of, at least, manslaughter! This might sound harsh, but the reality is that taking your eyes off the road to look at your cell phone screen, even for a few seconds, can result in you being directly responsible for the death of another human being.

Before you read further, I strongly urge you to check out Jill Konrath’s blog and the video link in her post (see Related Reading [1] below), to see what happened to her husband, Fred, and to Dave and Leslee Henson as a direct result of a driver texting while driving. Pay particular attention to “The eye-opening facts on distracted driving“.

www.stopthetextsstopthewrecks.blogspot.com

Cell phones, as enablers of instant connection, are a communication and networking blessing, but at the same time, they are a safety curse. There is nothing so important that it justifies compromising safety. Nowadays, we behave as though the world will come to an end if we don’t immediately answer a call or read and reply to text messages! Nonsense! What happens when you take a flight? The airlines insist you switch off your phone, period. Believe me, the world goes on for the next hour or even 10 hours. Calls and messages must (and can) wait. Why not adopt the same attitude when driving or operating machinery and equipment? And talking of air planes, how safe would you feel if you knew your pilot was texting on his / her cell phone while busy landing the plane you’re traveling in?

In the quest to save time we go for multitasking, which is another issue compromising safety (see Related Reading [2] below). Texting while in meetings has become a widespread practice and is now a habit which has spilled over into driving. Furthermore, the issues arising from using cell phones are valid in any situation where people “push the buttons and use the tools”. A ringing cell phone or a text alert breaks the concentration and tempts people to take their eyes off the ball / road / process. Cell phones should be PARKED while “on the job”.

ACTION

Park the Phone Before You Drive!

  • Share this Safety Tip widely and with all your employees, especially the video in Jill Konrath’s blog. Make a copy available for your employees to take home and share with their families (contact me if you need help with this).”
  • Review your company policy for cell phone use in your operating plants and when driving vehicles. This goes also for company-issued cell phones. Become tough with people who violate your “NO CELL WHILE DRIVING / OPERATING” instruction.
  • Why not suspend the ‘licence’ for six months if anyone’s caught using a cell phone while driving / operating a company vehicle / machine or while driving on your company property. That will send a clear message that you are serious! Alternatively, send them on paid leave for a week, to do duty at the ER of a local hospital.

PLEASE drop me a line telling me what you are doing in your company so I can let Fred and Leslee know / show them the good which is coming out of their tragedy.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Heartfelt thanks go out to Fred and Leslee for going public so others might learn from their experience, and to Jill Konrath for writing on this important subject of the dangers of texting while driving.

RELATED READING

[1]   Jill Konrath: “Avoid this Killer Strategy at All Costs”   Blog   Video

[2]   Jurgen Tietz: “Do Not Disturb

[3]   “Stop the Texts, Stop the Wrecks

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SCnSP – Do Not Disturb

♦♦♦     SAFETY CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE     ♦♦♦

In this series, I share with you my thoughts on Why Safety Is An Issue For Most Companies. One of the Things We Must Address If We Want To Improve Our Safety Performance is to ensure that our people understand the importance of FOCUS time and allow them to incorporate it into their daily work schedule.

Do Not Disturb - people at work

Have you ever tried putting up a “DO NOT DISTURB” sign at work? Or blocking out time in your electronic diary? What happened and should this practice be allowed?

Multi-tasking is often lauded and touted as a desirable, even necessary, trait for efficiency. However, it is a misunderstood concept and is, in fact, *not* an efficient way to get things done and can introduce unnecessary risks[2], eg. consider the risks of using a cell phone while driving, or a pilot being distracted whilst landing an aircraft.

Similarly, distractions and interruptions have a detrimental effect on the task at hand. Attention is diverted and thinking disrupted. The likelihood of a mistake being made once the person resumes the task increases three-fold[1], posing a very real safety hazard. Furthermore, the associated “resumption lag”[3] means it actually takes longer to complete the task, so productivity suffers.

Interruptions and distractions are a reality of our times. In an office environment, this can mean that work is taken home and hours spent “catching up”. (See “Kill the In Tray” [4]) In an environment or situation requiring a person to interact with equipment or machinery or controls, I’m sure you can see that the consequences can prove to be fatal.

We all have 24 hours each day, but successful people have a commitment to remain focused on the important stuff. They use their time efficiently and avoid interruption.

ACTION

  • Schedule just 30 minutes today, where you can appreciate uninterrupted time to focus on ONE important priority task and aim to finish that task. Close the door, put up a DO NOT DISTURB sign and take the phones off the hook. Beware of the email / busy trap, where you feel busy with lots of little urgent things, but you do not tackle the important stuff. (See “Waiting at the Doctors” [5]) At the end of the 30 minutes, check how much productive work you actually got done. During the following 30 minutes, operate normally and see how little you will get done, during the same time frame. Repeat this exercise a number of times, until you are convinced that productivity and success depend on focus, prioritisation and zero interruptions.
  • Now that you are convinced, it is time to create a schedule to get uninterrupted time in your day. Make it a fixed routine and ensure that people who take up your time are aware of your routine, including your boss. (See “Kill the In Tray” [4])
  • Take the above lesson and apply it to your safety critical tasks. Reduce the amount of interruptions and distractions and increase the focus on the task at hand to minimise the potential of mistakes – vessel entry, lifting, working at heights, shut-down -, start-up – and lock-out procedures, etc. including answering a cell phone.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

With grateful acknowledgement to Andrew Horton, whose post “Do Not Disturb”, inspired me to write this Safety Tip, with a focus on the safety risks.

REFERENCES

[1]   Andrew Horton “Do Not Disturb”

[2]   On the hidden perils of juggling too many jobs at once

[3]   Resumption Lag = “the time needed to ‘collect one’s thoughts’ and restart a task after an interruption is over.” [Erik M. Altmann, Task Interruption: Resumption Lag and the Role of Cues]

[4]   Jurgen Tietz “Taking Responsibility: Kill the In-Tray”   Click here to download.

[5]   Jurgen Tietz “Time and Priorities: Waiting at the Doctor”   Click here to download.

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SAPICS Conference Feedback

Keynote: Peopology – the Key to Sustainable Transformation
Feedback and Award

 

Dear Jurgen

I am delighted to advise you that you were awarded the SABMiller Kingfisher award at the SAPICS conference this week. This award is for the most innovative presentation and was voted for by the people who attended your presentation.

We are very grateful to you for your participation in the conference and the value you added to the delegates who attended your session. We shall certainly create the opportunity for a wider audience to attend your next presentation at our event!

We look forward to working with you again.

Jenny Froome, Manager, SAPICS

Jurgen Tietz' Most Innovative Presentation CertificateJurgen Tietz' Most Innovative Presentation Award

I couldn’t let this occasion pass without thanking all the people who have touched my life, who have given me the opportunity to share my thinking, who have enriched me and who have enabled me to grow during my career as a speaker.

When I was told that I had received this award, I felt both humbled and proud:

Humbled that it was the conference delegates that honoured me with their votes.

Proud that the committee allowed me to present my paper on one of my “pet” subjects and that the award is sponsored by SAB Miller, a company which has winning people and teams as part of their values = innovation.

In return, I can only promise to continue to strive to add value and help you meet your goals for a safe, healthy and environmentally-friendly workplace and life.

Jürgen Tietz

… found your presentation extremely motivating and relevant to most of the issues we are currently experiencing….not just at work but as a society.

Shane van Wyk, Business Solutions Specialist Bidvest Panalpina

I attended your presentation at SAPICS and applaud your innovation and award. … I look forward to attending future conferences where your wisdom is spread and people are inspired.

Fiona van der Linde, Manager GDSN, Traceability & Product Recall: GS1, Consumer Goods Council of South Africa

… Thoroughly enjoyed …

Ruth Edwards, Commercial Manager Specialist Inventory & Warehousing Commercial Services Procurement & Supply Chain, AngloGold Ashanti Limited, Continental Africa Region

… Great presentation …

Gert Kruger, HoD Supply Chain Omnia

Excellent presentation. Connect with the audience right from the start. Really felt inspired by him. AWESOME.

Great presentation!

Informative and practical in his presentation about leadership.

Awesome talk, really inspirational.

Motivating speaker.

Best speaker – Excellent topic and samples to proof his teachings.

He is straight to the point more on to people.

Super!

Well done, thanks!!!

Very good speaker – I like the way he incorporates diversity in his presentation.

Excellent tactics to get people involved, which in turn brings about change!

Very inspirational.

Deserves a bigger platform.

Yes! Want to see him again! most innovative, down to earth yet knowledgeable speaker. Awesome!!! Thank you!

Excellent!

Brilliant!

Best speaker

Well done. Must come back next year.

Excellent presentation.

He’s excellent. See him at future conferences YES YES YES, great presenter.

Brilliant speaker. Knows the topic.

Very good! Thank you.

The best so far!

Wow what a presenter. Very knowledgeable person.

Powerful workshop.

Excellent and engaging speaker.

Wow!!! Thanks a lot for your energetic presentation. all said was a true reflection of how our workplace is. Looking forward to seeing you next year.

Summary of feedback/comments from forms completed by delegates

Congratulations on winning the award for most innovative presentation!

It has been a pleasure meeting you and working with you in the run up to the conference. I look forward to working with you in the future.

Cindy-Lee Vosloo, Upavon Events Assistant

Jurgen gets to hold the valuable Kingfisher Trophy

Congratulations again on a well deserved award. Henrietta, in my team … raved about it.

David Crewe-Brown from SAB Miller accepts the award on Jurgen Tietz' behalf

Henrietta also advised that we invite you to SAB at some stage to inspire some of our SC people.

David Crewe-Brown,
Supply Chain Development Manager SAB Miller

Congratulations my old friend. I knew you could do it.

Mike Wilkie, Manager Mechanical Ngodwana Mill, Sappi Paper & Paper Packaging

Congratulations are in order, and well done to you for receiving this accolade. I also wish to express my thanks to you for all of your monthly newsletters and guidance. Still looking forward to meeting you sometime and in the meantime look after yourself, and keep those tips coming.

Darrel Baillie, SHE Facilitator Industrial Safety SAA Tech

Well done and congratulations. I am very glad that this recognition was given to you. If I read the citation I agree that you are the wothy recipient of this award.

Merten Jansen Van Rensburg, Regional Risk Services ManagerSappi

Well done, deservedly so.

Keep it up !

Henry Merrick, Group S&H Manager AEL Mining Services

Congratulations and well done!

Greg White, WCM & Energy Champion & Plant Manager, Saint-Gobain Gyproc

Close-up of the SAB Miller Kingfisher Award Trophy' behalf

Congratulations

Kaizer Khunwane, HSEC Manager Xstrata Coal, Phoenix Mine

Congratulations, that is awesome.

Roberta Prophet, Africa Cluster Safety Coordinator Unilever

Congratulations with the award. You thoroughly deserve it.

Well done.

Rudy J Raath, Mine Manager THG Richtersveld Operations

Well done Jurgen, keep the ball rolling.

Graham Burn, Group Process Operations SHEQ Manager (Pr Cert Engineer) Anglo Platinum Base Metals Refiners Waterval Farm

Congratulations Jurgen! Well deserved.

Justin Cohen, International Speaker & Author

Congratulations top speakers …

Tom Bonkenburg, Director European Operations, St Onge Company, Netherlands

Well done Jurgen … you definitely are one of the best I have seen!

Tibor Szana, Director: Construction; Major Hazard installations & Explosives
Department of Labour

Congratulations on your award. Due to your intervention, I am able to think out of the box, which enabled me to add value to our business of producing electricity.

Peter Granville May, Senior Advisor Fire Risk & Emergency Management Eskom Sustainability

My sincere congratulations on your achievement …

Mathews Amunghete, Chief Inspector of Mines – Mine Safety & Services Division, Directorate of Mines, Ministry of Mines & Energy Namibia

Congratulations on your award. Indeed it is well deserved. I have had my own experience of working with you and know this from first hand experience. Well done.

Tumi Tsehlo, Managing Director SA Mint Company

You deserve it.

Keith Stewart, MD Combustion & Gas Burner Services aka Gasburn

Well done on your Most Innovative Presentation award, excellent!

Gavin Halse, Director Product Strategy AdaptIT Durban

Jurgen!! CONGRATULATIONS!! Well done!

I honestly think it is more a matter of you touching other people’s lives than vice versa. Your sincerity and enthusiasm always motivates me.

I really enjoyed reading your paper. Thanks for sharing it with me.

Isa Fourie, Senior AdvisorEskom Kendal Power Station

Congratulations! Well done!

Annie Greeff, Consultant

Well done Jurgen – keep thinking and talking the important messages …

Gary Bowles, MD Sappi Chemical Cellulose Saiccor Mill

Well done Jürgen. You deserve it.

Edwin Matlapeng, Mine Safety Manager Goldfields South Deep Mine

Congratulations on an award you richly deserve. Bestowed upon you by your peers – it’s wonderful.

When I first met you at the speakers convention, it was then that I recognized your innovative presentation talents and went on to say to the chairman at the time ‘watch that quiet unassuming little man with the one eye – there goes one of the most underrated speakers – he will emerge!’

Your award bears testimony to what I predicted when I first met you. You are a giant – be proud!

Alain de Woolf, Entertainer

Well done you deserve the recognition.

Chris Silver, Business Unit Manager Exxaro Tshikondeni Mine

I also would like to acknowledge and appreciate all your efforts in keeping us abreast in current safety trends.

Kekeletso Selepe, Principal Technical Official Eskom

… It is an even greater pleasure to learn of your achievement. Well done to you and it is undoubtedly well deserved.

May you continue to grow from strength to strength.

Pauline Pirthi, Regional Business Planning & Strategy Manager Eskom

Well done on the achievement, Jurgen, you deserve it….because you are special.

Alex Stramrood, Corp OHS Manager (Op) Operational – Sustainability Div, Eskom

Thank you as well for each and every email received over the years …

Morkel van Wyk Goldfields

Congratulations on that milestone I think you have deserved that.

Anton Stevens, Project SHE Manager Bakubung Platinum Mine (Wesizwe), WorleyParsonsTWP

Congratulations on the award!

Cara Woollacott, Senior Practioner: SC Risk Coordinator Sasol Group Services

To a true Champion of his topics JURGEN TIETZ CONGRATULATIONS!!!!!!!!!!

Cecil Cordiglia, Safety Officer Transnet Rail – Rail Management Engineering

Congratulations Jurgen

Elain Chetty, SHE: IMS Practitioner Sasol oil Supply Chain         Landela Madubane, SHEQ Manager Transnet

Congratulations!

What a great achievement!

Allan Ingham-Brown, HR Manager Cargo Motors

This is indeed a fantastic award. It will definitely not be awarded to you if it was not well deserved. Keep up the good work and thank you for the wonderful contribution towards Safety. You are truly making a difference.

Johan van Wyk, Senior Specialist SCR – Emergency Response Sasol Group Services

Congratulations on your prize, it indeed befits what you are and what you stand for. Were I also in attendance, I couldn’t had any other chance but to vote you being the best.

Keep up the good work … Keep those beautiful messages coming.

Letlatsa Tseka, Safety Risk Management Business Integration & Performance Management, Eskom Transmission Division, Simmerpan, Germiston

WoW. Congratulations! That certainly is a great honour and recognition for you. However not un-deservedly so. You have touched the lives of so many people and their families (by giving powerful messages that have in many ways contributed to the improved safety and well-being of people) and also by the uplifting example of your life and your leadership philosophy.

You are for me a shining example of what one of the radio-stations are promoting – LEAD SA.

Willem Mare, HR Business Partner Mondelez aka Kraft

Well done.  The cream always rises to the top.

Stan Savitz, MD Joint Manager, Safety Through Empowerment of People

Your innovative approach and passion in whatever you do has finally been properly acknowledged – Congratulations!!!!!

Phuti Kgano, Consultant Behavioural Safety

Congratulations!

Pam Leppich, Safety Officer Consol Klip

Siyakubongela.

Hlangabeza Gumede, Principal Specialist Chamber of Mines

Congratulations to you. I am proud to say that you really deserved it. Your talks are really motivating and I always learn a lot from you.

Makwena Mashaba, Safety Officer Eskom Matimba Power Station, Risk & Assurance

Congratulations, Jurgen! Well done!

(Dr) Graham Edwards, CE AECI

Congratulations with the award received, it is great to be acknowledged when doing “good work” !

Fritz Konig, QAM AECI

Congratulations upon the achievement of the award … I’m grateful for your tips sent to me which I have been reading …

Robert Nuwagaba Kasese Cobalt Co Ltd Uganda

Congratulations on the award, you needed to be recognized for your passion on safety issues.

I am sure you have and continue to coach South Africans on how to handle Safety.

Nomasonto Monapathi Goldfields

Congratulations on the award, you needed to be recognized for your passion on safety issues.

I am sure you have and continue to coach South Africans on how to handle Safety.

Nomasonto Monapathi Goldfields

Congratulations! Mr Tietz, you really deserved this award. You are one in a million.

Annie Ntoampe Eskom

back to Top

Show me the good stuff

I use my mirror technique to customise my presentations for each client.
For this technique to work, I need photos of the GOOD, bad and ugly stuff.

Hunt down the GOOD stuff and find the safety champion and give him/her the recognition.

This enables me to ask the audience:

“What do YOU see?
What is wrong?
What is GOOD?
Who is responsible?
Is it the player or is it the coach?”

This is a most powerful technique to engage the audience and to get them to take ownership for what they see. Play the video on my S.H.E. ATM screen to see what I mean.

Sometimes, however, for security reasons, clients do not allow me to use my own camera. In these cases they offer to let me have their photos. I invariably find that all they can give me is photos of the bad and ugly things. Photos of poor housekeeping and maintenance, waste and spillage are typical examples, because those are the obvious ones. Also, the photos are normally taken of the plant, equipment, stores, workshops and similar areas. It is seldom that I am given photos of personal work spaces like office desks, cupboards, toolboxes, rest areas, chairs, etc. We somehow focus on the negative, on the breaking of the rules and poor behaviour. People find it tough to share with me photos of GOOD areas which are clean, neat and tidy and where the rules are being followed.

I also do not get photos of improvements, where a safety problem has been fixed. Taking before and after photos is something safety professionals do not do.

When I take my own photos, I hunt down the GOOD stuff and find the safety champion so I can include him / her in my photo. Recognising people in this way is a most powerful tool for motivation.

 Be safe – the SIMPLY SMART way,
Jürgen

1 person likes this post.

SCnSP So Many Meetings, So Little Time

♦♦  CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Aug 2012

In this series, I share with you my thoughts on Why Safety is an Issue for Most Companies, or, putting it differently, Things we Must Address if we Want to Improve our Safety Performance. Under the microscope today is our effective (or not!) use of time, in particular when it comes to meetings.

     

So Many Meetings, So Little Time

Picture: Panel of experts in a meeting

     

All of us have to deal with meetings in one form or another and, to a larger or lesser extent, for all of our lives. Especially in safety, meetings seem to be a primary mode of operation for many companies. If they have a safety issue / problem / incident, they organise a meeting.

Meetings can be a blessing or a curse. A blessing, if they are well run, productive and achieve the results we are looking for and cannot otherwise achieve. A curse if they are not necessary, turn out to be a waste of time, involve mostly hot air (talking), create confusion and do not lead to people taking responsibility, especially for ACTION.

Most people suffer from the meeting paradox: “We don’t have time to prepare for effective meetings, because we spend too much time in ineffective meetings.”

Time is the most precious resource we have and, the more senior your position, the more precious it becomes. We all have this finite resource of 24 hours, relentlessly ticking by. That is why it is such a tragedy that people waste it in unproductive meetings. If you do not believe me, have a look at this short video for some horrifying facts and figures around meetings.

I believe that every company would greatly benefit from employing a

meeting “PIMP” = “Performance Improvement and Measuring Professional”.

In terms of the law (OHAS ACT 85 OF 1993 S17 – S19 and MHAS ACT 29 OF 1996 S25 and S35) we have no option. We MUST have safety committees and therefore meet. However, how we do this and how well we use this time is up to us.

The biggest problem is that we do not prepare for these meetings and that the members of the safety committees (this applies equally well to other committees and meetings) do not play their proper role in these meetings.
As a general rule, 50% of the time should be spent preparing for the meeting (including thinking time), 20% attending and partaking in the meeting and the remaining 30% to take action and follow up on and close out agreed actions.
Furthermore, we do not make it crystal clear who owns the action, what the result should look like and by when the action should be completed. Often, it is not even clear who owns each item on the agenda.

ACTION

Resolve TODAY to take the necessary action to transform your meetings from a curse to a blessing.

My guidelines for effective meetings will assist you with this.

free
Download

Acknowledgements: Thanks to Graham Edwards for planting the seed and so inspiring me to write about time vs meetings in relation to safety.

ON OFFER

Picture: COOL TOOL Facilitation Playing Cards
COOL TOOL™ Facilitation Playing Cards

These playing cards encourage thinking and participation by all during meetings and when planning critical work. Cards are a fun medium with which everyone is familiar and do not require special skills, thus removing barriers to use. The 52 cards cover Communication and Understanding, Thinking and Shortcuts, Attitude and Recognition, Responsibility and Planning.

Enquire here

Why not let me be the “Meeting PIMP at your next safety committee meeting at the EXCO level.   To take advantage of this offer, answer my 10 Questions about your operation’s safety needs and send them to me.

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