Search Results for: Audit

SCnSP – The Best Audits

♦♦  CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Oct 2013

In this series, I share with you my thoughts on Why Safety Is An Issue For Most Companies. One of the Things We Must Address If We Want To Improve Our Safety Performance is to examine the purpose for Safety Audits and how this necessary practice can be used as an improvement tool.

     

The Best Audits

     

If your company operates on the principle that safety audits are carried out by Safety Professionals for the purpose of policing non-compliance to “The Rules and Standards”, then read on.

The safety fraternity has adopted this practice from the accounting profession for good reason – inspecting, examining, checking and verifying of safety systems, procedures and equipment are all necessary. Sadly, the correction aspect is seldom seen as an improvement tool, and the safety audit, rather than being a means to an end, is merely the end itself.

So how do you facilitate a mindset shift from “This safety audit is a necessary evil of policing, inflicted by some external source (the Safety Professionals)” to “This safety audit is a powerful self-improvement tool ” ?

  1. Invest the time necessary to make sure everyone understands the fundamental purpose (in its entirety) for continuous safety audits, viz.

  2. Make safety auditing an on-going line responsibility (same as you do with output, costs, quality, etc.).
  3. The systems, rules and regulations, standards and procedures should not only be “in place” and working, but also be accepted and understood by all, so as to foster an ownership mentality.
  4. Auditing of plant and equipment, safety mechanisms, fire fighting, first aid, emergency equipment, interlocks, trips and alarms, instruments and other safety critical devices with a “look to see” mindset will highlight aspects that could be improved on.
  5. Make sure that the inspection, examination, verification and reporting aspect of a safety audit is not used as an excuse for “not having time” to workshop and implement improvements.

ACTION

'Stop unsafe practice' and 'Safety Champion Recognition' tool - isiZulu version

  • Issue each auditor with a set of 2 red and 4 green cards. Red to stop an unsafe practice / operation and green to recognise people who are doing the right or safe thing. This will force the auditors to look for the GOOD things and find safety champions to recognise.
  • Schedule time to coach line people to do self-audits. (This investment in time will save you plenty of time in the long run.) Then, at the annual Safety Day, recognise and reward those who self-audit well, instead of just those with the best metrics.
  • Auditor Hat - A practical application of the audit logos
    Audit Hat Logos e.g. PPE Examiner, Work Permit Specialist, Machinery Expert and more

  • Get the auditors to wear hats / badges, depicting the focus area which they will be looking at. This gives high visibility and at the same time ensures that each auditor is concentrating on one specific aspect of safety.
  • Although I am against paperwork, consider drawing up an audit preparation check list: What to do and have ready for an effective audit. Provide training for the ‘hosts’, as well as your team leaders and safety reps, on how to enable an audit.
  • Give feedback on the audit findings to the ‘players’ who “push the buttons and use the tools”, not only to the ‘coaches’ (managers). The players have just as much a role to play in the safety ‘game’!

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The Best Audits – Auditing vs Policing

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What’s in a Hat?

Back-end a Dead-end?

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SCnSP – When is the safety battle won?

♦♦  CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Jul 2017
     

When Is The Safety Battle Won?

Engaging hearts and minds

Heart = OwnershipMind = Commitment

     

Many centuries ago, a Roman general was leading his legions towards the enemy in a swampy country. He knew that the next day’s battle would be fought on a certain plain because it was the only dry, flat place for miles. He pushed his army all night, marching them through a frightening and formidable swamp, so that they reached the battle site before the enemy and could claim the high ground.

In the aftermath of victory, the general called his troops together and asked them, “Brothers, when did we win the battle?”
One captain replied, “Sir, when the infantry attacked.”
Another said, “Sir, we won when the cavalry broke through.”
“No,” said the general. “We won the battle the night before – when our men marched through that swamp and took the high ground.” [1]

So, when is the SAFETY battle won?

Not when the rubber hits the road, or the airplane is at cruising height, or the construction is in progress, or the plant is operating on full steam. Not by analysing the statistics, reporting ‘near misses’ and investigating incidents. Not by paperwork and audits. Not by being reactive.

No … because by then it’s too late. All you can do then is police for compliance. I mean, can you imagine if the general in the above story had used that approach – having to check (audit) that his troops are actually fighting and using the correct combat tactics, rather than leading them in battle?

No. The safety battle is won long before any of the items mentioned above. It is won when we manage to get safety into the hearts and minds of all our people. It is won when we have succeeded in getting people to make safety a habit, in everything they do. Before they tackle each task, while they’re carrying out the task and after they’ve completed the task. It is won when the safety ABC is in place – individual safety Attitude, Behaviour, Choice. It is won when our people are no longer complying out of fear of being caught and disciplined or because the boss is watching. The safety battle is won when our people are thinking ‘Safety Assurance’ as part of the preparation for everything they do. It is won when individual perceptions of risk include thinking about consequences.

Finally, the safety battle is won when we all are looking at continuous improvement and best practices and sharing how to work smarter and safer. It is won when our people are not afraid of failing and treat every ‘near hit’ as an opportunity to improve productivity and safety.

Picture: Disruptive safety call to action icon

As safety professionals, we should strive to support the business by improving productivity safely!
We should be the first port of call when people are thinking of taking a shortcut or reporting a ‘near hit’ or ‘failure’. And it should be because they know and trust that we will help them do it safely, instead of blaming, and crucifying them for pushing the boundaries.
Safety Always.

[1]   Pressfield, Steven. The Warrior Ethos. Black Irish Entertainment LLC (2011). 978-1936891009.

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GM – Election Lessons for Safety (2016)

\\\\\\  \\\\\\      CURRENT AFFAIRS      //////  //////
Aug 2016
     

Election Lessons for Safety

Picture: local elections logo

     

The dust hasn’t quite settled yet, but it is nevertheless a good time for me to put on my safety hat and, once again, share my views with you on the recent elections. There are some safety lessons we can learn.

The outcome was, to a certain extent, determined by the campaign strategy. The ANC campaigned to retain its position and not lose control rather than going out to win and strengthen its position. The DA campaigned for change, a good strategy when your current climate is one of high dissatisfaction with the status quo. The EFF campaigned for the poor and marginalised. Their ticket was one of hope for a better future for those who have nothing to lose.

So, here are the lessons:

  • If you run your safety campaigns with the aim of not doing worse than before, you are on the wrong track. Trying to beat the previous record is just more of the same. A campaign for change, improvement and hope is the one that will get you voters’ buy-in.
  • Beautiful election manifestos, full of undertakings and promises, are just that – beautiful pieces of paper. Like your safety policy, they are meaningless and likely to end up windswept or in the dustbin unless you step up to the challenge and put the words into action.

ACTION

  • Look at your safety campaigns. What is the message to your “voters”? Seriously, if your employees were to “vote for safety”, how well would you do?
  • Look at your safety policy. How well is it adhered to? Is it just looking pretty on the wall so that you can earn that tick at the next audit?

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SCnSP – What’s your real job?

♦♦  SAFETY CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
May 2016
     

What’s Your Real Job?

(as a Safety Professional)

graphic with text I'm just asking

     

Frequently, when I contact safety professionals, I am told: “We are busy with audits” or “I still have to do the monthly report” or “I am in a safety meeting” or “We are preparing for the EXCO”.
So, my challenge to you, as a safety professional, is:
Describe your real job in a paragraph or two, as if you were a safety consultant and had to sell your services to interested parties.
Now ask yourself: Would you pay a safety consultant for only doing audits, collecting figures, sitting in meetings, producing reports and being a safety accountant?

I know. You have to satisfy the needs of senior management, because they control the resources – pay your salary and approve your budget. Yes, there are legal stipulations which you have to comply with, in terms of reporting and ensuring the safety of employees. Yes, there’s work to be done to get and maintain your accreditation. And yes, you have a job description, with key performance areas in auditing and reporting.

Nonetheless, ask yourself: Who are your real clients? Does all the reporting, auditing and graphs you spend so much time on improve the safety culture? How much of what you do positively affects the employees – the people who ‘push the buttons and use the tools’ – directly? How much of what you do are ‘self-generated’ activities or distractions which you do because it seems the right thing to do?

Consider. If you are cook, what’s important is the meal you serve. If you are surgeon, what matters is your performance in the operating theatre. If you are speaker, your talk on the stage is what it’s all about.
Most professionals have to spend up to 90% of their time in preparing, ensuring quality, staying up-to-date and many other things. However, none of this matters if the meal is poor, the operation is botched up, or the talk makes no impact because we spent too much time on distractions, instead of the real purpose of our job.

Don’t allow yourself to get confused about which part of your job is really important, really worth your time, the actual point of the exercise, of providing safety support – the part which makes a real difference!

ACTION

Get clarity about what your real job is, then tackle it and deliver!

Look into the ‘integrity mirror’ and list your main tasks. Categorise them into Must Do (value-adding – someone is willing to pay for this), Nice To Have (not critical for safety) and Who Really Wants This (distraction / non-value adding).
If need be, go and rewrite your job description! You are the ‘safety cook’!

Ask the employees (not your managers):

  • How difficult are we making it for you to spend money on safety improvements?
  • How well are we listening, and reacting, to safety concerns or suggestions?
  • How easy is it for you to contact senior managers?
  • Do we give you permission to take action to make it safe?
  • How safety empowered are you and how do we know this?
  • What are we doing to improve and reinvent safety?
  • How good are our safety professionals?
  • What are we doing to support our SHE reps?
  • How much time are we spending on safety and how is that time spent?
  • How much of our safety efforts are re-active as opposed to pro-active?

RELATED READING

I’ve written about this issue a number of times, addressing it from different angles:

Mirror on the wall

Stretched thin

The illusion / paradox of control

I don’t have time

Safety first – really?

The best audits

What is your worth?

Under the knife

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SCnSP – See it, Believe it, Do it

♦♦  SAFETY CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Apr 2016
     

See It, Believe It, Do it

(Awareness, Trust, Action)

graphic depicting the steps to it

     

Getting results in safety is not about only one thing – it’s about three things:
People need to see safety and they need to believe in safety before they will do safety.
Actually, safety is about four things, because to believe someone, you have to trust that person.

To see is to create awareness. Usually this is done via awareness posters, toolbox talks, even walk-abouts or audits. But this doesn’t necessarily translate into action or a change in behaviour.

So, getting people to believe in safety is more complicated. It requires trust and respect. Trust comes from experience, from word of mouth, from promises fulfilled. Respect is given after actions are observed.

Trust is earned.
Respect is given.
Loyalty is demonstrated.

Betray any one of those and you lose all three.

Awareness and trust lead to action.

And action is what happens when someone actually goes and votes, or buys something, or shows up, or talks about it. And action is as complex as trust. Action requires overcoming the status quo, action means that someone has dealt with the many fears that come with change and felt that fear and still done something.” [1]

ACTION

Do you believe you can make a difference in safety?
Do you believe it is worth the effort?
What are you doing to earn the trust of your fellow workers and the respect of your leaders?
Are you taking action, or is the lure of “later” (procrastination) holding you back?

[1]    “Awareness, Trust and Action

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GM – S-T-R-E-T-C-H-E-D   THIN

♦♦  SAFETY CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Jan 2016
 

S-T-R-E-T-C-H-E-D  THIN

(not a recommended diet plan)

 

I feel thin, sort of stretched, like butter scraped over too much bread.
— Bilbo Baggins in “The Fellowship of the Ring” by J.R.R. Tolkien
graphic depicting butter being spread on slice of bread

Many people and companies are feeling s-t-r-e-t-c-h-e-d going into 2016. Many are aware that they have to revise what they do and how they do it. Perfect timing – it’s a new year!

A new year is a bit like a new day … it’s an opportunity to start fresh, to apply what has been learnt from experience, to correct mistakes, to be a better version of oneself, to do things in a better way.

The realisation or acknowledgement that one has the opportunity to “start anew” is energising. But it requires some thought. Does one need a “new start”? Why? What will one do differently? Is it better and will it give one the desired results? What steps must be taken?

As I’m sure you’ve noticed by now, I am often inspired by Seth Godin’s posts and how they frequently underline my thinking on safety. In his post entitled  Is it too little butter, or too much bread? [1],  Seth reflects on resources, or rather, a perceived shortage thereof.

“Insufficient resources to get a job done / completed” – it unfailingly features in the Top 10 Excuses List.  But it needn’t, if you’re smart about what you do with the “safety butter” you have.

As Seth says: “… doing a great job with what we’ve got is the single best way to get a chance to do an even better job with more, next time.” [1]

Having to make do with less engenders creativity.
But you don’t even have to get creative.
Just G-R-O-W your SHE Reps.

Instead of getting more safety professionals to do more audits, create more paperwork, write more reports and procedures … enable your existing people to become active Safety Representatives.

So, if you’re feeling s-t-r-e-t-c-h-e-d, make the most of what you have.
As a leader, make it your underlying goal for 2016 to equip your people to do the best job they can.
As a SHE Rep, make it your underlying goal for 2016 to equip yourself to do the best job you can.

I wish you a productive and successful 2016.
May you G-R-O-W into your dreams and goals.

[1]    “Is it too little butter, or too much bread?

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GM – VW Deception

♦♦♦   CURRENT AFFAIRS   ♦♦♦
Oct 2015

VW Deception

(Lessons About Measurement)

The VW deception[1]  is unforgivable. Yes, we should denounce this kind of behaviour and yes, heads should roll.  It leaves one discomforted, distrustful, wondering if it is happening, as yet undiscovered, in pharmaceuticals, medical care or health & hygiene, especially in food processing. (Mind you, a while back it did, with the horse meat scandal[2].)

I see this behaviour as a direct consequence of a culture where measurement becomes the end in itself and not the means to an end. It’s what happens when we ‘cook the books’ to reflect the result we are looking for, instead of assessing the results so as to ensure quality, safety, health, risk control or environmental protection. True measurement goes way beyond compliance to a minimum standard. Proper measurement is a tool for continuous improvement.

What VW did is similar to what is being done by many companies. Whenever a company ‘sets up’ or ‘spring cleans’ or ‘prepares’ just before an audit or alters statistics in order to meet audit criteria to keep the record intact … it is committing fraud by deception. It is defrauding its personnel, or the public or both.

We tend to feel quite justified in making our own amendments to figures. So did the guys directly involved at VW. But now VW is in trouble, because the company was caught out and it has customers who can vote with their wallet. As a top brand there is only one way – down.

Misrepresenting or selectively using data is a world-wide occurrence. Why did we find it necessary to put so much time and effort into the King Commission on corporate governance[3]?  Surely not because there is no problem in our backyards?

ACTION

This is between you and your conscience. Look into the mirror and ask yourself how often and by how much you adjust the figures on emissions, effluents, performance, waste, recycling, accidents, observations, near miss reporting, performance, costs … ? If you are in a leadership position, you might not be directly involved, but you are accountable for the culture which breeds this kind of behaviour in your organisation!

[1]   “Volkswagen: The scandal explained“, by Russell Hotten, BBC News, 7 October 2015

[2]   “2013 meat adulteration scandal“, from Wikipedia

[3]   “King Report on Corporate Governance“, from Wikipedia

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SCnSP – Moving the Elephant

♦♦  SAFETY CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦

In this series, I share with you my thoughts on Why Safety Is An Issue For Most Companies and the Things We Must Address If We Want To Improve Our Safety Performance.

Leveraging the whY factor to move the elephant.

Moving the Elephant

It’s all about the whY factor

sketch of an elephant and definition of purpose

Some of the most often asked questions I come across in safety are:

  • Why don’t people follow the rules?
  • Why don’t people engage with us?
  • Why don’t people use the system / PPE / safety equipment / … ?
  • Why don’t people use their common sense?

People know what to do. If they have been around for over six months, are competent and trained, they know what to do (this includes, when, where and who). They also know how to do it. The rules, procedures and standards exist.

The answer to the above questions lies in the whY factor. Once people understand and accept why something has to be done, the what and the how follow. The whY factor is what moves the elephant.

It’s not hard to do the right thing –
it’s hard to know what the right thing is.
Once you know, once you know what’s right –
it’s hard not to do it.[1]

Often, the O-generation does not understand the (wh)Y-generation = insisting on ‘knowing why’.[2]  But part of to know what the right thing is, is understanding why it’s the right thing. The whY factor is the emotional component of doing things. When one gives people einspruchsrecht, i.e. the right to partake in decisions which affect them, one inevitably provides the why.

We have to give people the purpose
in return for engagement and creativity,
even though we might argue that safety is common sense.

ACTION

If you’re asking “Why don’t people … ?”, then you have a whY factor problem. You should be rephrasing your safety question to “Do my people understand and accept the purpose, the why, we have to do the right things?” This is a much tougher question, because it creates a shift from blame to action.

[1]   From the movie “The Confession

[2]   “O” = older and “Y” = younger / millenials

RELATED READING

“Safety as a Value”

“The Best Audits”

“Safety Fever”

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SCnSP – Illusion/Paradox of Control

♦♦  SAFETY CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦

In this series, I share with you my thoughts on Why Safety Is An Issue For Most Companies and the Things We Must Address If We Want To Improve Our Safety Performance. It’s time we re-examine the “power to influence” (control) as opposed to the “capacity to have an effect on” (influence) with respect to Safety Behaviour.

The Illusion / Paradox of Control

(Are we in control of Safety Behaviour?)

Illusion and Paradox of Control text as a graphic

I have written about this before – the issue of control and influence. It is such an important aspect of our work in safety that, when I read Seth Godin’s post[1] on the subject, it stimulated me to put a safety spin on what he wrote.

We have this “idea that we are in control“, that through policies and procedures we can ensure zero harm. It drives our Safety Management efforts. It fuels our “compelling belief” that this year we will reach our safety targets. It opens the door to consultants who try to convince us that if we just use their system, we’ll get exactly the silver bullet we have been looking for.

It’s like we’re setting ourselves up for disappointment. I mean, the reality is that “we’re never in control, not of anything“. Instead, we should strive to view all our efforts as a means to try to influence safe behaviours. As in the “service business“, this is “a tough sell” for the safety professional.

Seth ends his post with these punchlines:

  • When the illusion of control collides with the reality of influence, it highlights the fable the entire illusion is based on.
  • and
  • You’re responsible for what you do, but you don’t have authority and control over the outcome. We can hide from that, or we can embrace it.

I would like to end my post with these thoughts:

  • Control contains a peculiar paradox. The more you impose control, the less control you have, because it removes accountability from someone who should own the responsibility in the first place. [2]
  • and
  • When you no longer push the buttons or use the tools, you should become a servant to those who do! [3]

ACTION

Think about what you do.

How much of what you and your team of safety professionals do is:

  • Tell, command, prescribe, lay down the rules / policy / procedures, set the standards, …
  • Audit / police against the above.
  • Collect, report on information to justify what already has happened.
  • Reactive to incidents, accidents, near hits (misses), short cuts, …
  • Sitting in your office behind a desk.

Or are you

  • Embracing the reality of influencing with trust and integrity.
  • Listening, supporting, helping, caring, recognising, respecting, empowering those you serve.
  • Encouraging them to take responsibility for their own safety at work and at home.

[1]  “The Illusion of Control“, by Seth Godin

[2]  from “Beyond Management“, by Etsko Schuitema

[3]  from “Life EduAction“, by Jürgen Tietz

RELATED READING

“Year-End Take Safety Home Message”

“Influence of Frontline Personnel”

“Your Safety Dream”

“People”

“Safety as a Value”

“Fire! Fire! Fire!”

“Ukuhlanya”

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SCnSP – SARS and SAFETY

♦♦  SAFETY CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦

In this series, I share with you my thoughts on Why Safety Is An Issue For Most Companies and the Things We Must Address If We Want To Improve Our Safety Performance.
    WARNING    Make sure you’re sitting down for this one.

SARS and SAFETY

(How easy are we making safety?)

building sign for Edenvale branch

I love SARS!   Actually, I love interacting with SARS by going to their offices in Edenvale or using their eFiling system. Yes I know, SARS means that I have to pay, but they make me feel like a valued customer they want to see back for ‘repeat’ business – quite unlike the experiences which I have in many of the mass retail outlets, where I am treated as if I am a nuisance, standing in a queue.

At SARS I get treated with respect and my issues are taken seriously, with a genuine effort to satisfy my needs. From Luthando at the reception, allocating my ticket for the audio visual queuing system, to Zandi the tax consultant, verifying my details and doing an online query. There is also a notice, offering assistance with filling in the tax forms for you. I get an email / SMS notification when there is a tax issue I need to deal with. It is truly an absolute pleasure dealing with the SARS staff.

How easy are you making safety for your people?

Do you see them as clients to whom you are providing a service?
Do you treat them as if they are customers who have a choice regarding where they can buy their safety services from?
Do you offer assistance with filling out safety incident reports?
Do you have a hassle free help line in their first language?
Do you talk and listen to the people?
How open is your door and does the mat at the feet say “Welcome” / “Vho tanganedzwa” / “Wamukelekile” / “Welkom” ?

Or … are you too busy with processes, procedures, policies, papers, posters, reports and compliance audits?

ACTION

  • I challenge you to take this question seriously by asking people, at all levels, including the ‘key customers’ (line managers), how they feel about the service you are providing to them.
  • Ask people, especially at the shop floor, what they understand about the different safety concepts, ratios and safety lingo.
  • Ask your ‘key customers’: “How can I HELP”?

Take a leaf out of SARS’ book.
Make taking safety seriously easy for your people.

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