Search Results for: Discipline

SCnSP – Discipline

♦♦  CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Oct 2012

In this series, I share with you my thoughts on Why Safety Is An Issue For Most Companies.
One of the Things We Must Address If We Want To Improve Our Safety Performance is DISCIPLINE.
A safe operation requires employees who are SELF-disciplined. What drives it? How can you get it?

     

Discipline and Passion

key ingredients in the foundation mix of safety

Picture: collage depicting that passion in anything leads to self-discipline

     

DISCIPLINE is a key ingredient in the foundation mix of safety. NO discipline means NO sustainable safety.

The crown of discipline is SELF-DISCIPLINE – everybody taking safety seriously, all the time, without policing, at work and at home . . . . the habit of doing the safe thing and working to a code of conduct.

A close cousin to self-discipline is PASSION. Commitment – Dedication – Focus – Consistent – Concentration – Perseverance. These all are features of passion.

The best way to explain the strong link between passion and self-discipline is the sports analogy. World class sportsmen and women have an immense passion for their sport. As a result of passion, they develop the self-discipline to get up at the crack of dawn and into the water or onto the track to practice, practice, and practice, every day to improve their skill and performance. They play to the rules of the game and are fanatical about reaching their goals to become (world) champions in their field. These champs have bridged the gap between reason and desire.

The Road to Safety Discipline is a tough one, spanning a four-pillared bridge of self-discipline – cleanliness, orderliness, punctuality and compliance.

What is called for are independent safety thinkers and consequently active safety employees. We have to grow Safety BEE’s – Behaviour (safety) Empowered Employees. We have to get people beyond understanding and even accepting the reason for safety to having a deep felt desire to practice safety.

How to grow employees to be passionate about safety and thus safety self-discipline?

This is the most demanding challenge you will face in terms of behavioural safety. I use the player / coach analogy. The player has to show up and practice, which includes doing things that are not fun like fitness training, or in a safety sense, good housekeeping. The coach must be, consistently, a safety VIP – Visible, Involved, Pro-active. This LEADERSHIP ROLE is critical.

The full article on this subject, “The Power of Discipline”, is available as a download.

Download

SEND YOUR FEEDBACK

Contact Jürgen

LOOKING FOR SOMETHING?

Search the S.H.E. ATM
Copyright: Jürgen Tietz
Terms of Use

«  prev

next  »

 

SCnSP – When is the safety battle won?

♦♦  CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Jul 2017
     

When Is The Safety Battle Won?

Engaging hearts and minds

Heart = OwnershipMind = Commitment

     

Many centuries ago, a Roman general was leading his legions towards the enemy in a swampy country. He knew that the next day’s battle would be fought on a certain plain because it was the only dry, flat place for miles. He pushed his army all night, marching them through a frightening and formidable swamp, so that they reached the battle site before the enemy and could claim the high ground.

In the aftermath of victory, the general called his troops together and asked them, “Brothers, when did we win the battle?”
One captain replied, “Sir, when the infantry attacked.”
Another said, “Sir, we won when the cavalry broke through.”
“No,” said the general. “We won the battle the night before – when our men marched through that swamp and took the high ground.” [1]

So, when is the SAFETY battle won?

Not when the rubber hits the road, or the airplane is at cruising height, or the construction is in progress, or the plant is operating on full steam. Not by analysing the statistics, reporting ‘near misses’ and investigating incidents. Not by paperwork and audits. Not by being reactive.

No … because by then it’s too late. All you can do then is police for compliance. I mean, can you imagine if the general in the above story had used that approach – having to check (audit) that his troops are actually fighting and using the correct combat tactics, rather than leading them in battle?

No. The safety battle is won long before any of the items mentioned above. It is won when we manage to get safety into the hearts and minds of all our people. It is won when we have succeeded in getting people to make safety a habit, in everything they do. Before they tackle each task, while they’re carrying out the task and after they’ve completed the task. It is won when the safety ABC is in place – individual safety Attitude, Behaviour, Choice. It is won when our people are no longer complying out of fear of being caught and disciplined or because the boss is watching. The safety battle is won when our people are thinking ‘Safety Assurance’ as part of the preparation for everything they do. It is won when individual perceptions of risk include thinking about consequences.

Finally, the safety battle is won when we all are looking at continuous improvement and best practices and sharing how to work smarter and safer. It is won when our people are not afraid of failing and treat every ‘near hit’ as an opportunity to improve productivity and safety.

Picture: Disruptive safety call to action icon

As safety professionals, we should strive to support the business by improving productivity safely!
We should be the first port of call when people are thinking of taking a shortcut or reporting a ‘near hit’ or ‘failure’. And it should be because they know and trust that we will help them do it safely, instead of blaming, and crucifying them for pushing the boundaries.
Safety Always.

[1]   Pressfield, Steven. The Warrior Ethos. Black Irish Entertainment LLC (2011). 978-1936891009.

ESSENTIAL LINKS

Icon: Jurgen-Antzi with a mike

The Safety Rep’s Survival Guide  –  what it is and why you need it

Let me help your staff reflect upon, recommit to and be responsible for championing your safety culture.

Search the S.H.E. ATM  –  for safety and wellness answers, tools and methods

Contact Jürgen

Copyright: Jürgen Tietz
Terms of Use

«  prev

next  »

 

SM – Mother’s Rules

♦♦♦    SAFETY MATTERS    ♦♦♦
Aug 2009
     

Mother’s Rules

     

The term health, safety and environment (HS&E) is used widely. We appoint HS&E, SHE, or H&S Representatives, but the quality of the ‘H’ component of our management systems is often very low.

At some of the companies that I have visited, heath and hygiene does not really feature in the agenda or the actions of management, representatives or workers, except in the HS&E policy pasted on the walls.

Would you like to be operated on in a hospital where the ‘H’ does not feature? I often see personal protective equipment (PPE) that could not protect the wearer and has even become a health risk in itself!

This self-imposed risk is especially true for the way that some workers treat their disposable PPE, like disposable ear plugs, disposable dust masks and gloves. Imagine your surgeon using soiled rubber gloves and contaminated face masks. Or imagine re-using condoms. No surgeon and no informed worker would do such things, yet some workers used soiled respirators and breathe contaminated air into their lungs!

disposable dust mask being reused

Workers should take good care of all their PPE. Disposable PPE should not be stored once it becomes dirty. Workers, supervisors, managers and HS&E specialists should discuss the long-term health risks of exposure to hazards like dust, bright light, low light, noise and hazardous chemicals. Where they do not have enough reliable information, they should call on specialists to provide information. Suppliers, hygienists and occupational health staff would be glad to assist.

Where workers, supervisors, managers and specialists find that they do not all agree on the nature or level of the risk, or on the best course for preventing loss, they should likewise call on specialists and investigate the occupational health issues until they reach agreement at all levels of the organisation.

Ten House Rules

To help raise awareness about health and hygiene, ‘H’, I use a cake of soap with Mother’s Rules printed on the wrapping:

Mother's Rules

These are basic ‘house rules’ about health that everyone should have learnt at home. Everyone, except mothers, tends to forget the rules from time to time. Perhaps mothers like repeating these rules because only fools would argue with them! Workers are legally obliged to follow health and hygiene rules.

Employers, like mothers, have many obligations too. Employers have to assess health risks and supply the soap and other appropriate cleaning material. They have to ensure a work environment free from health risks.

Health and hygiene management may be a matter of minor or mildly serious infections at home, but at work it could be a matter of serious infection, fatal exposure, or long-term exposure resulting in chronic disease.

Mothers use common sense to train young people how to avoid hazards at home. At work, the hazards are larger, more complex and there are more of them. Workers should not make the mistake of believing that common sense alone will save them from harm.

Employers have to make a special and continuous effort to find hazards, assess the risk to workers and visitors, make workers aware of the pathways of exposure, teach them how to avoid harm and provide the right PPE at the places and times where some exposure cannot be avoided.

Workers have the legal obligation to learn and follow these occupational health procedures. Where workers ‘forget’ or ignore the ‘house rules’, employers are dutybound to use discipline – in the spirit of love – just like mothers do!

Full PPE (1)Full PPE (2)

Operators wearing full PPE

ESSENTIAL LINKS

Icon: Jurgen-Antzi with a mike

The Safety Rep’s Survival Guide  –  what it is and why you need it

Let me help your staff reflect upon, recommit to and be responsible for championing your safety culture.

Search the S.H.E. ATM  –  for safety and wellness answers, tools and methods

Contact Jürgen

Copyright: Jürgen Tietz
Terms of Use

«  prev

next  »

 

SCnSP – Running Like Hell and Panting Like Crazy

♦♦  CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Nov 2016
     

Running like hell, panting like crazy

What it takes to be a “top dog” …
… doing instead of talking

Picture: panting like crazy

     

Do you feel like you’re running like hell and panting like crazy … and getting nowhere? Then this one is for you, whether you are a CEO or a frontline manager. At each level, you are a leader in your own right. In fact, at home, in your family and in your community you are a leader, without appointment or position – merely by your actions.

There are thousands of books, written on leadership.
My take on leadership is simple and practical.

Leadership is what you believe, what you see, what you hear, what you read and learn, but, most of all, what you do:

  • the movement you create by the action you take (because words rarely change things);
  • the trust you create – envision, change, simplify, know and innovate;
  • the integrity you show – listen, respect, recognise, care and relate;
  • the way you deal with accountability – fix, coach, build, help, empower and expect results.

Leaders don’t wait for instructions – they provide direction.

If you are spending your time in meetings, instructing, prescribing, following up, chasing, checking, reviewing, supervising and, in general, trying to control what other people are or should be doing, then you are not leading, but managing [1]. You are most probably running like hell and panting like crazy.

Picture: Disruptive safety call to action icon

Do work that matters.
Care about how what you do impacts on others.
Protect and grow your people, balance priorities with resources, empower your people, make them think and then get out of their way.

Stand back, take a helicopter view, educate and empower and move your people from dependence to interdependence.
Why? There’ll be less running and panting and definitely more positive results.

[1]    You manage/handle horses, not people! Manage comes from manege ‹ Italian maneggiare to handle, train (horses), derivative of mano ‹ Latin manus hand. Present use, to be in charge of, run, be head of, head, direct, control, preside over, lead, govern, rule, command, superintend, supervise, oversee, administer, organise, conduct, handle, take forward, guide, be at the helm of.

RELATED LINKS

Purpose” from the series “Safety on a Shoestring Budget

Safety as a Value – Leaders’ Roles and Responsibilities

Safety, for Safety’s Sake

Gupta Lessons

Action Speaks Louder Than Words

The Politics of Safety

Discipline and Passion

SEND YOUR FEEDBACK

Contact Jürgen

LOOKING FOR SOMETHING?

Search the S.H.E. ATM
Copyright: Jürgen Tietz
Terms of Use

«  prev

next  »

 

SCnSP – It’s just a project

♦♦  SAFETY CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Jun 2016

This is a really simple tip. Get this right, and you could turn your job on its head!

     

It’s Just A Project

Picture of a vegetable patch

     

Did you know you’re a project manager?

Seriously. You are. Every time you shop, decide what to wear, put air in your bicycle or car tyres, or catch a train or bus, you’re completing a task in what could be the project plan for your Lunch Project, or Date Project, or Career Project.

You’re the Project Manager of your life. The project may be as simple as hanging a picture on a wall, or a little more involved, like creating a vegetable garden or painting your home. It could be a project that only takes an hour to complete, or years and years. It might be a project to make sure things keep running properly (maintenance project), or a project for something new or better (development project).

So you can see that “project” is just the name given to the process of getting something done.
A project has a purpose: something that must be achieved, created, completed.
Whether or not you’re aware of it, a project also has a plan: by when you want or need it done (deadline), the steps that must be taken (tasks to be completed), what the right order is for those steps, how much time you think will be needed for each step, what you will need (people, tools, materials, money), how much of each you will need and by when, and, of course, it must have a start time and/or date.

If your project has a non-negotiable completion time or date, or if you have a limited budget, you may need to rearrange some of the steps, or get someone to help you with some of the tasks, or find a smarter way to do something so that you can finish it on time and within the budget you have available. Depending on the project, you may want to work out in advance what you will do if things don’t go according to plan. Sometimes, you might find you need to change your plan when you’ve already started on the project because one or more of the steps (tasks) has taken longer than it should have and you need to find a way to get some of the other steps done more quickly, or because a resource you need is not available at the time you need it, or something is costing you more than you expected it to. That, in essence, is project management.

Without even thinking about it, you already run at least some aspects of your personal life as projects. Maybe, without realising it, you do the same with your job.

Your “life” projects may be exciting (getting that new car) or necessary (eating a meal) or both. Whether or not they achieve their purpose (objectives) depends on the importance you attach to them (priority) and your self-discipline. The same goes for your job.

ACTION

See your job / role / function in your place of work as a series of pro-active projects which you choose (important). Such projects are exciting, about making change happen, about making improvements and exploring new options. They are about ‘now’ so give them deadlines. Make sure that the routine aspects of your job (emails, phone calls, meeting, reports, etc.) don’t suck up all your time so that you are too busy to complete the pro-active projects!

FEEDBACK

Your comments and feedback are always welcome!

Contact Jürgen

LOOKING FOR SOMETHING?

Try searching for it or use the search topics feature

Search the S.H.E. ATM
Copyright: Jürgen Tietz
Terms of Use

«  prev

next  »

 

SCnSP – Power of the List

♦♦  SAFETY CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦

In this series, I share with you my thoughts on Why Safety Is An Issue For Most Companies and the Things We Must Address If We Want To Improve Our Safety Performance. Today I remind you of a habit you shouldn’t allow to die.

Power of the List

(Urgent vs Important – The Story of Priorities)

graphic detailing points of wisdom regarding habits

“  The next thing you do today will be the most important thing on your agenda, because, after all, you’re doing it next. Well, perhaps it will be the most urgent thing. Or the easiest. In fact, the most important thing probably isn’t even on your agenda.  ”  —  Seth Godin, The Most Important Thing

I fully agree with this statement.

We have stopped using lists, in particular To Do lists. Nowadays, with computers and smart phones, what we should do often gets lost due to information overload / noise. Despite the conveniences and wonderful tools and apps these machines provide, information is getting ‘lost’ and no longer visible. We allow their power to disable us – we rely on machines which are not able to think (at least not yet!).

The power of lists lies in the “3 F‘s”:

Writing out a list forces us to Focus on what is important and has to be done next.
A list, used effectively, compels us to Finish what we start.
We get Fulfilment from ‘crossing out’ completed items.

All of these are highly visible, making keeping lists a most worthwhile habit to cultivate.
Using lists requires the habits of discipline and diligence. What is important is to keep the To Do list short, simple, relevant and realistic. Focus on the most important things you shouldn’t forget to do today. (Urgent matters will appear on your doorstep all on their own – you don’t have to keep a list for those!)

The same principles apply to checklists.

Would you want to fly in an aircraft where the team in the cockpit is not using pre-flight checklists that are simple, relevant and focused on the important things for take-off and a safe flight?

ACTION

  • Look at your personal habits of getting important things done and reconsider using the good old, tested and trusted To Do list.
  • Examine your “pre-flight” / start-up checklists. Do they focus on the critical items or are they complicated and cluttered with unnecessary information?

RELATED MATERIAL

Circle of safety

Who Am I? (Make it a habit)

Pen to Paper (Safety on a shoe string)

“Waiting at the Doctor’s – Time & Priorities” – from the book Life EduAction by Jürgen Tietz

FEEDBACK

Your comments and feedback are always welcome!

Contact Jürgen

LOOKING FOR SOMETHING?

Try searching for it or use the search topics feature

Search the S.H.E. ATM
Copyright: Jürgen Tietz
Terms of Use

«  prev

next  »

 

SCnSP – Have You Been Tagged – State of Pedestrian Safety

♦♦♦    SAFETY CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE    ♦♦♦

In this series, I share with you my thoughts on Why Safety Is An Issue For Most Companies. One of the Things We Must Address If We Want To Improve Our Safety Performance is to review the state of pedestrian safety inside our company premises as well as surrounding communities and take action to reduce pedestrian fatalities.

picture of the Decade of Action for Road Safety tag

Have
You
Been
Tagged?

 

State of Pedestrian Safety

picture of the Decade of Action for Road Safety tag

NEWS FLASH    NEWS FLASH    NEWS FLASH    NEWS FLASH

24 June 2014
“A cyclist is fighting for his life after he was hit by a car on the R102 …”

22 June 2014
“A pedestrian is in a critical condition after he was knocked down on Hendrik Potgieter Rd …”

21 June 2014
“Man in a critical condition after he was knocked over by a construction vehicle.”

Enough? No?

31 May 2014
“A man was critically injured after he was hit by a car along Ballito Drive.”

27 May 2014
“54-year-old woman tragically lost her life after she was knocked over by a motor vehicle.”

26 Apr 2014
“A 29-year-old male pedestrian was killed at the M1 and M2 interchange in Booysens …”

Still not enough? Well, it is for me!

So, are you willing to be tagged?

The real tag I’m referring to will cost you effort, time and possibly even money … but it will be worth it, if you believe that life is priceless.

Watch this video, then read on.

snapshot of the video entitled The Long Short Walk

We’re almost halfway through the UN Decade of Action for Road Safety, which was officially launched 11 May 2011 via a resolution supported by 100 countries. This resolution was subsequently adopted by the UN General Assembly on 10 April this year.

The official aim of the Decade of Action is to stabilise and then reduce global road traffic fatalities by 2020. Making it real, the aim is to save 5 million lives.

Globally, road traffic incidents rank 8th as a cause of death.

But, they are the leading cause of death for people between the ages of 15 and 29.

Horrific stats.  That’s our younger generation.

Delving deeper, globally, pedestrian deaths amount to 22% of all road deaths every year – that’s over 270,000 people. Pedestrian fatalities in the African Region are sitting at 38%.

In South Africa, between 35-37% of all road fatalities are pedestrian fatalities.

If no effective action has been taken since 2011, then the forecast figures indicate that this year the figure of 270,000 will have increased to 330,000 by now.

South Africa launched the Arrive Alive Road Safety Campaign in 1997.
The RTMC is running a 365 Days Road Safety Campaign and published their revised Strategic Plan for the next 5 years in March.

Are these initiatives working?

At the 82nd UN Assembly (2013), Jeremiah Mamabolo said that the Arrive Alive Road Safety Campaign “had resulted in a drastic reduction in the number of deaths from accidents and sharpened the response of law enforcement agencies and health services.”

You can read all about the RTMC’s progress related to the “5 Pillars for the Decade of Action for Road Safety” in their latest annual report, and decide for yourself.

Like it or not, the fact remains that it is up to each and every individual to take responsibility for road safety.
Why not start with pedestrian safety?

♦ As individuals, we can ensure that we have not “gardened” up the paving areas outside our homes to the point where pedestrians are forced to walk in the street.

♦ As responsible citizens, we can ensure our communal areas and company premises are safe for pedestrians.

ACTION

  • Do a survey of pedestrian safety inside your company premises, including inside buildings. Are there enough walkways, clearly demarcated / barricaded off, for people to walk safely?
  • Look for places where people are NOT using the walk ways and establish why short cuts are being taken. Ask people, don’t make assumptions. Is it a matter of education / policing / discipline?
  • Go to your surrounding communities and look for opportunities to help with pedestrian safety, especially around schools. Can your company sponsor Zebra crossings, side walks, or anything else which can show your community that you do care.
  • Draw up a home safety flyer / cartoon brochure for your employees to take home and to distribute at schools to highlight the risks and safe behaviour. Or get posters that Arrive Alive and the RTMC have designed.
  • Share “The Long Short Walk” video with others and “tag” your people.

REFERENCE MATERIAL

Global Plan for Decade of Action for Road Safety & its 5 Pillars:
   Road Safety Fund material
   WHO material

Decade of Action for Road Safety tags

Pedestrian Safety WHO Manual (publ 2013)

National plan of action for South Africa:
   2011 strategy document
   2014 revised strategy plan

Global Status Report on Road Safety 2013

Reports for South Africa:
   Stats for South Africa that were used for Global Status Report
   Stats from Arrive Alive South Africa
   RTMC Annual Report 2012-2013

News excerpts

Graphics courtesy of  Decade for Action tags  &  Make Roads Safe

KEY DATES TO DIARISE

16 November 2014 (annually, 3rd Sunday of November):  World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims

4-10 May 2015:  Third UN Global Road Safety Week

2015 (details TBA):  Second Global Ministerial Conference on Road Safety (to be held in Brazil)

ADDITIONAL LINKS

Campaign brochure:  Safe Roads for All

Pedestrian Safety Advice:  from Arrive Alive South Africa online

Zenani Mandela Campaign

FEEDBACK

Your feedback and comments are always welcome! Drop me a line!

Copyright: Jürgen Tietz
Terms of Use

«  prev

next  »

 

Your Paper Footprint – Environmental Murder?

WASTE – Trees and killing the Environment

A barrow-full of waste paper

Recently, I had to clean out the attic to make room to store some more stuff I no longer require – just in case I need it in the future. Confused? Read on …

One of the things I came across (which I added to my “rubbish to throw out” pile) was my old accounting documentation. I had a wheelbarrow full of papers, dating back more than 10 years to when I started my business. They were all neatly bundled, categorised and labeled, and, of course, buried under a ton of dust.

Apart from the schlepp to now move and get rid of all this paper, there is the BIG issue of WASTE. Why, I asked myself, had I produced and kept this paper trail for years?

The answer lies in some relic of an accounting/legal requirement that we have to make hard copies of all our transactions and keep them for 5 years, in case there is an audit by SARS. It’s not only bookkeepers, but also sales, logistics and a number of other disciplines that are stuck in this paradigm of “one original with triplicate copies” – white, pink, green and yellow – to give this waste some colour.

Please understand that I have nothing against paper (SAPPI is one of my World Class clients), bookkeepers, copier and printer companies or sales and delivery people per se. I do, in fact, understand and subscribe to efficient systems and controls to keep track of and account for money and assets. Furthermore, the world cannot function without paper for packaging, printing and books. Paper is still the #1 means for knowledge transfer and will continue to be for ages to come.

What I do have a problem with is the WASTE of resources like Time, Money, Energy, Space and also Human Resources. There is waste in producing paper we don’t need in the first place, handling it, filing it, storing it, disposing of it and, ultimately, filling up our waste dumps or having to collect and recycle it. The irony is that, in most cases, the information on the paper is transferred by data capture clerks into one or other computer system! Why not enter it directly into the system, without any paper? The legal/auditing reason I mentioned earlier is a poor excuse. Nowadays, even money-sensitive operations like SARS and banks are going more and more PAPERLESS. With the growth in EFTs, the cheque book will soon become a true museum piece. Yet, I am frequently asked to provide a “cancelled cheque” to verify my account details when completing a vendor application!

ACTION

Forget the carbon footprint for a moment and look at your PAPER FOOTPRINT. In areas under your control, like your safety systems, how much WASTE are you creating through your paper systems? All in the name of being able to have a “paper trail” which you can audit? There are tons of smarter ways to do this using technology.

Start at home, in your safety area of responsibility. As long as you have files & folders, filing cabinets and archives, monthly reports, board papers and the glossy annual reports, you leave a huge paper footprint. You are killing the environment. Incidentally, printers and copiers are paper eaters of note. If you place these devices and filing cabinets in offices, people will feel obliged to use them. Period!

You need to break the habit of “let’s make / keep a copy” by firstly changing your systems and attitude towards data capture and storage. Issue all employees with a memory stick to “take a copy” if they have to. Better still, keep documentation in a controlled network location, where access to it can be logged electronically (security feature) whilst still being accessible to those who need the information. Then, once you have proven it can be done, go to the EXCO and make a case for using this concept to drive home the issue of WASTE and actively contribute to taking care of the ENVIRONMENT.

WARNING

Watch it! If you are fuming by now, you might set all the paper around you alight. 😀 😀 😀

RELATED READING

Safety Data – a blessing or a curse?

Be safe – the SIMPLY SMART way,

Jürgen

Be the first to like.

GM – Under the Knife

♦♦  CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Feb 2013
     

Under the Knife

World Class Safety: Health & Hygiene

Picture: operating theatre staff

     

I have “signed my life away” and I feel like doing a full audit of all the tools, equipment, labelling, but . . . . it’s too late. I am flat on my back on the hard, cold and narrow operating table at Linksfield Hospital.

There is something frightening, yet reassuring about these masked faces.

Frightening, because the doctors have literally got my life in their hands. Thoughts of: “What if . . . .” flash through my brain.

Reassuring, because I know that I can ‘rest assured’ that I am in the best hands, the hands of genuine professionals.

I try to stay alert as nurse Rebecca gives me some oxygen, “just to be safe . . . .” and hooks me up to the monitoring instruments. I see Dr van der Spuy inserting the ‘plastic’ needle of the drip. The last words I hear are “You will feel . . . .” I am asleep in an instant.

Back in the ward, after recovery, I feel so good that I have to pat for the plaster or bandage. Perfect pain control! I have time to think about my hospital stay.

I am sharing this story of my operation with you because a hospital is a prime example of World Class S.H.E. – SAFETY, HEALTH and ENVIRONMENT. I am not talking about a third world bush clinic here, but of a facility and standards we all should strive for in our own operations, be it a factory, plant, mine or office complex.

  • Highly skilled doctors and nursing staff, serious about their work and following strict procedures, without taking short cuts.
  • Non-negotiable rules, such as those regarding hygiene. No one would even contemplate entering the operating theater without a sterile gown, slippers, gloves and mouth guard. Protection (PPE) for both the patient and the medical staff!
  • Working together as a team. No fooling around or taking chances. Clear cut roles and responsibilities – surgeon, anaesthetist, theater nurse, ward sister, cleaner, with no room for error and a spotless environment.
  • Identification and labeling is taken dead seriously, down to a milligram for medication. Identitags and bar coding for the patient with full particulars like ward, bed, responsible doctor, planned procedure, and double checking everything with sign-off (my brother’s keeper), to avoid any misunderstanding.
  • Pre-admission (pre-start) check lists. The anaesthetist would not dream of putting a patient to sleep without a face-to-face examination.
  • Monitoring and record keeping of blood pressure, pulse, temperature, medication, without fail. This is all part of discipline and genuine patient care, including hand-over to the next shift and the following of “doctor’s orders”.
  • Continuous improvement (‘plastic’ needle), especially in procedures and equipment, is part of making it safer for the patient and thus improving SHE all round.

ACTION

My challenge to you:

Use this write up for your next couple of toolbox talks. Furthermore, use it as a model to audit your operation. Forget your existing safety checklists and standards for a moment. Think out of the box and utilize this write up as a wake-up call. Get your senior leadership to ask: “If our operation were a hospital in which we carried out procedures and people’s lives were at stake, what would we do differently, right NOW? How SERIOUS would we be about adhering to our own policies and procedures?”.

SEND YOUR FEEDBACK

Contact Jürgen

LOOKING FOR SOMETHING?

Search the S.H.E. ATM
Copyright: Jürgen Tietz
Terms of Use

«  prev

next  »

 

SCnSP: The Hidden Power of Good Housekeeping

♦♦  CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Sep 2012

In this series, I share with you my thoughts on Why Safety is an Issue for Most Companies, or, putting it differently, Things we Must Address if we Want to Improve our Safety Performance. Read on to discover the hidden benefits of good housekeeping.

     

The Hidden Power of Good Housekeeping

Picture: Neat and clean personal workspace

     

Housekeeping is a dirty word for many due to a fundamental attitude issue.

Many employees see it as something over and above their job functions, whereas they really should adopt it as an integral function of their job. The result is that bad habits develop – employees do their work, clean up a little at the end of the shift and then … L … spring clean – just in time for the upcoming audit.

Some employers consider it to be not only something which does not make money, but also as a waste of money – something they have to do for cosmetic reasons or merely to please inspectors. Some even go as far as doing the bare minimum only – a good slap of paint to cover up the real problems. LL

We need to make everybody realise that poor housekeeping is a sign of a lack of order and structure, discipline and compliance. It has a direct impact on quality, productivity and safety (S.H.E.). There are few who are able to function in a mess. It is the old story of ‘a dirty place leads to a dirty mind’, i.e. muddled up thinking and confusion. People get hurt – slip, trip and fall (4 letter words) – when there is poor storage and if things are not kept neat, clean, secure and labelled. The 5S system, developed by Toyota originally, talks about Sort, Shine, Set in order, Simplify and Sustain. In S.H.E., these things do help to prevent injury and loss.

Good housekeeping has 3 hidden benefits:

  1. It makes safety highly visible and therefore problem areas surface quickly.
  2. It has a carryover in attitude towards safety rules, procedures, standards, systems and equipment.
  3. It’s a player issue. We all know what to do and don’t need a coach to hold our hand. Nothing is stopping us from working neatly, cleanly, securely and with everything labelled. It also doesn’t cost much money to have a place for everything and to put everything in its place.

Good housekeeping starts in personal work spaces – your desk, office, workbench, car, cabinet, drawer, store, toolbox, etc. It starts at home. I have looked at hundreds of personal workspaces and I can see the difference in safety attitude with ‘one eye closed’.

Do not underestimate the power of the above-mentioned three benefits of good housekeeping. If you can get good housekeeping into people’s hearts as a value, the rest of safety is much more straightforward. Make it a habit, as the leader, to become a true safety VIP for good housekeeping. Be Visible, Involved and Pro-active.

SEND YOUR FEEDBACK

Contact Jürgen

LOOKING FOR SOMETHING?

Search the S.H.E. ATM
Copyright: Jürgen Tietz
Terms of Use

«  prev

next  »

 

Jurgen Tietz brings you Safety: by the people, for the people
Need a keyword?

H&S Rep Workshop

H&S Rep Training
The
Not Just Any
H&S Rep Workshop
that’s for everyone.

Read about it here

Share this page

Find me on

Connect with Jurgen Tietz via FacebookConnect with Jurgen Tietz via LinkedIn

Join the revolution

Disruptive Safety
The Safety Reps Survival Guide handbook