Search Results for: Environment

Your Paper Footprint – Environmental Murder?

WASTE – Trees and killing the Environment

A barrow-full of waste paper

Recently, I had to clean out the attic to make room to store some more stuff I no longer require – just in case I need it in the future. Confused? Read on …

One of the things I came across (which I added to my “rubbish to throw out” pile) was my old accounting documentation. I had a wheelbarrow full of papers, dating back more than 10 years to when I started my business. They were all neatly bundled, categorised and labeled, and, of course, buried under a ton of dust.

Apart from the schlepp to now move and get rid of all this paper, there is the BIG issue of WASTE. Why, I asked myself, had I produced and kept this paper trail for years?

The answer lies in some relic of an accounting/legal requirement that we have to make hard copies of all our transactions and keep them for 5 years, in case there is an audit by SARS. It’s not only bookkeepers, but also sales, logistics and a number of other disciplines that are stuck in this paradigm of “one original with triplicate copies” – white, pink, green and yellow – to give this waste some colour.

Please understand that I have nothing against paper (SAPPI is one of my World Class clients), bookkeepers, copier and printer companies or sales and delivery people per se. I do, in fact, understand and subscribe to efficient systems and controls to keep track of and account for money and assets. Furthermore, the world cannot function without paper for packaging, printing and books. Paper is still the #1 means for knowledge transfer and will continue to be for ages to come.

What I do have a problem with is the WASTE of resources like Time, Money, Energy, Space and also Human Resources. There is waste in producing paper we don’t need in the first place, handling it, filing it, storing it, disposing of it and, ultimately, filling up our waste dumps or having to collect and recycle it. The irony is that, in most cases, the information on the paper is transferred by data capture clerks into one or other computer system! Why not enter it directly into the system, without any paper? The legal/auditing reason I mentioned earlier is a poor excuse. Nowadays, even money-sensitive operations like SARS and banks are going more and more PAPERLESS. With the growth in EFTs, the cheque book will soon become a true museum piece. Yet, I am frequently asked to provide a “cancelled cheque” to verify my account details when completing a vendor application!

ACTION

Forget the carbon footprint for a moment and look at your PAPER FOOTPRINT. In areas under your control, like your safety systems, how much WASTE are you creating through your paper systems? All in the name of being able to have a “paper trail” which you can audit? There are tons of smarter ways to do this using technology.

Start at home, in your safety area of responsibility. As long as you have files & folders, filing cabinets and archives, monthly reports, board papers and the glossy annual reports, you leave a huge paper footprint. You are killing the environment. Incidentally, printers and copiers are paper eaters of note. If you place these devices and filing cabinets in offices, people will feel obliged to use them. Period!

You need to break the habit of “let’s make / keep a copy” by firstly changing your systems and attitude towards data capture and storage. Issue all employees with a memory stick to “take a copy” if they have to. Better still, keep documentation in a controlled network location, where access to it can be logged electronically (security feature) whilst still being accessible to those who need the information. Then, once you have proven it can be done, go to the EXCO and make a case for using this concept to drive home the issue of WASTE and actively contribute to taking care of the ENVIRONMENT.

WARNING

Watch it! If you are fuming by now, you might set all the paper around you alight. 😀 😀 😀

RELATED READING

Safety Data – a blessing or a curse?

Be safe – the SIMPLY SMART way,

Jürgen

Be the first to like.

SCnSP – Rework Your Safety Approach

♦♦  CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Feb 2018
     

Re‘-Work Your Safety Approach

Including your H&S Rep Training

Empowered Safety Rep

     

Let’s re-examine the real reason why safety is important.

We want our employees to return home to reunite with their families, every day. We want our assets and plants to remain in a safe and productive state. We want to re-use our resources and be relentless in reducing waste and effluent. Our operations need to be refined to reach the goal of reliably producing environment-friendly products.

Often, one of the causes of problems with safety is that we repeat old mistakes, over and over and over again. We need to recollect and learn from the past. One of the ways to do this is by conducting managerial reviews as part of our management system and standards.

The ‘RE‘ words

These are really important for safety because they’re action words and safety is not a once-off exercise.

RETURN  to the basics of safety.
REDISCOVER  the power of people – driven by a safety vision.
REQUEST  involvement and participation by all in safety.
REVIEW  your safety approach – reactive or proactive?
RECONSIDER  your safety recipe – approach.
RENEW  your safety systems and approach.
REFRESH  your approach – no papers, posters and pamphlets.
REINVENT  how you engage your people in safety.
REFLECT  on your attitude towards safety.
RECOGNISE  safe  behaviour and results.
REINFORCE  safe behaviour.
REWARD  Disruptive Safety[1] – better, faster, cheaper, safer.
RECHARGE  your safety efforts – our safety batteries are limited.
RETHINK  the repercussions of taking chances.
RECALL  incidents and remind employees of the consequences.
REVISE and REWRITE  your procedures to include safety.
RE-EXAMINE  what is preventing safety success.
REMOVE  causes of / reasons for unsafe behaviour.
RECTIFY  unsafe conditions promptly.
REPAIR  broken or damaged equipment or assets.
RESTORE  safety equipment and devices.
REPRIMAND  reckless behaviour.

Note

The word REACT is not in the above list because that is the most important behaviour / action to avoid in safety. A reactive approach focuses on compliance and corrective action only, rather than on prevention and doing the right things.
Also note that the words REVIEW, RECONSIDER, RENEW and REFRESH are all key to Disruptive Safety™ and that is why we have created The Safety Rep’s Survival Guide and are running in-house workshops.

Picture: Disruptive safety call to action icon

Ask yourself and your team:

Are you giving your internal customers (company employees) what they need or ordered, or are you merely flogging them stuff you think they should have or do, i.e. things they didn’t ask for, don’t understand or accept, can’t use and don’t value?

Don’t brush this off. This is a critical question if you want to get buy-in from the people you serve. It’s easy to assume that co-workers / employees don’t know what’s required in order to keep them safe. How do you know what it is that they do or don’t know if you haven’t asked them?

Listen and respect the input from those who ‘push the buttons and use the tools’. Accept their recommendations and legalise their actions = make them safe. This is where your H&S Reps play a critical role, provided they have been properly educated and empowered.

[1]   Disruptive Safety™ promotes a futuristic approach to safety which shifts the safety paradigm from ‘Preventing wrong’ to ‘Ensuring right’. Read more

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Nigel Risner, my international professional speaking colleague, who granted me permission to adapt the ‘RE’ concept for purposes of this safety tip.
[www.nigelrisner.com]

ESSENTIAL LINKS

Icon: Jurgen-Antzi with a mike

Let me help your staff reflect upon, recommit to and be responsible for championing your safety culture.

Search the S.H.E. ATM  –  for safety and wellness answers, tools and methods

Contact Jürgen

Copyright: Jürgen Tietz
Terms of Use

«  prev

next  »

 

SM – Site Colonoscopy

♦♦♦    SAFETY MATTERS    ♦♦♦
     

Site Colonoscopy

When last did you conduct one?

     

Without exception, all companies have the capital E for environment in their SHE abbreviation for their safety efforts, but are they serious about the E? The E sounds good in the safety policy and looks smart on the wall, but when last did you conduct a plant colonoscopy? How frequently do you go to the backend of your process, there where the waste and effluent spew out? Normally only the janitors, cleaners and contract waste removal companies see that part of your operation. We are good at shifting the burden of looking after the environment onto someone else – let them deal with our ‘nasties’ and we merely pay the price.

Conducting a plant colonoscopy means starting at the back and looking at what and how much waste and effluent, including gaseous effluent, we generate and, particularly, at how safe and clean these handling facilities are. Often they are a real mess, because these facilities are seen as a necessary evil that we do not want to waste our money on. A colonoscopy also means flushing out the whole system by taking a good look at drains, bunds, drip trays, drain valves and pumps, filters, bins and silos. Are these fit for purpose in effectively catching or separating the waste and effluent? Look for spillages and leakages and track where these are routed to.

Do you accept waste and effluent as part of the process? How much effort is put into reducing off-cuts, run-offs and spillages, or at least collecting and reusing them in the process? We allow people to use the hose pipe to wash stuff down the drains. Do you recycle materials outside your own process? Collecting and recycling paper, plastics, glass, metal and oil is a simple matter of attitude and some bins and containers, often provided by the recycling companies.

We are all responsible for protecting the environment, not only at work, but at home as well. If you mess, you clean up. We should all re-duce, re-use, re-cycle and prevent waste and effluent in the first place.

ESSENTIAL LINKS

Icon: Jurgen-Antzi with a mike

The Safety Rep’s Survival Guide  –  what it is and why you need it

Let me help your staff reflect upon, recommit to and be responsible for championing your safety culture.

Search the S.H.E. ATM  –  for safety and wellness answers, tools and methods

Contact Jürgen

Copyright: Jürgen Tietz
Terms of Use

«  prev

next  »

 

SM – Mother’s Rules

♦♦♦    SAFETY MATTERS    ♦♦♦
Aug 2009
     

Mother’s Rules

     

The term health, safety and environment (HS&E) is used widely. We appoint HS&E, SHE, or H&S Representatives, but the quality of the ‘H’ component of our management systems is often very low.

At some of the companies that I have visited, heath and hygiene does not really feature in the agenda or the actions of management, representatives or workers, except in the HS&E policy pasted on the walls.

Would you like to be operated on in a hospital where the ‘H’ does not feature? I often see personal protective equipment (PPE) that could not protect the wearer and has even become a health risk in itself!

This self-imposed risk is especially true for the way that some workers treat their disposable PPE, like disposable ear plugs, disposable dust masks and gloves. Imagine your surgeon using soiled rubber gloves and contaminated face masks. Or imagine re-using condoms. No surgeon and no informed worker would do such things, yet some workers used soiled respirators and breathe contaminated air into their lungs!

disposable dust mask being reused

Workers should take good care of all their PPE. Disposable PPE should not be stored once it becomes dirty. Workers, supervisors, managers and HS&E specialists should discuss the long-term health risks of exposure to hazards like dust, bright light, low light, noise and hazardous chemicals. Where they do not have enough reliable information, they should call on specialists to provide information. Suppliers, hygienists and occupational health staff would be glad to assist.

Where workers, supervisors, managers and specialists find that they do not all agree on the nature or level of the risk, or on the best course for preventing loss, they should likewise call on specialists and investigate the occupational health issues until they reach agreement at all levels of the organisation.

Ten House Rules

To help raise awareness about health and hygiene, ‘H’, I use a cake of soap with Mother’s Rules printed on the wrapping:

Mother's Rules

These are basic ‘house rules’ about health that everyone should have learnt at home. Everyone, except mothers, tends to forget the rules from time to time. Perhaps mothers like repeating these rules because only fools would argue with them! Workers are legally obliged to follow health and hygiene rules.

Employers, like mothers, have many obligations too. Employers have to assess health risks and supply the soap and other appropriate cleaning material. They have to ensure a work environment free from health risks.

Health and hygiene management may be a matter of minor or mildly serious infections at home, but at work it could be a matter of serious infection, fatal exposure, or long-term exposure resulting in chronic disease.

Mothers use common sense to train young people how to avoid hazards at home. At work, the hazards are larger, more complex and there are more of them. Workers should not make the mistake of believing that common sense alone will save them from harm.

Employers have to make a special and continuous effort to find hazards, assess the risk to workers and visitors, make workers aware of the pathways of exposure, teach them how to avoid harm and provide the right PPE at the places and times where some exposure cannot be avoided.

Workers have the legal obligation to learn and follow these occupational health procedures. Where workers ‘forget’ or ignore the ‘house rules’, employers are dutybound to use discipline – in the spirit of love – just like mothers do!

Full PPE (1)Full PPE (2)

Operators wearing full PPE

ESSENTIAL LINKS

Icon: Jurgen-Antzi with a mike

The Safety Rep’s Survival Guide  –  what it is and why you need it

Let me help your staff reflect upon, recommit to and be responsible for championing your safety culture.

Search the S.H.E. ATM  –  for safety and wellness answers, tools and methods

Contact Jürgen

Copyright: Jürgen Tietz
Terms of Use

«  prev

next  »

 

GM – Water and Women in Rail n Safety Conference

\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\      CURRENT AFFAIRS      ///////////////
Sep 2016

Today, I have 2 matters which I wish to speak about, so I will keep each one short, but that is by no means an indication of the importance that I attach to both.

     

1.  Running Water

Picture: water

     

Recently, we spent a week at a private game lodge, in the tented camp, right in the middle of the bushveld. It was a most enriching experience for us to be able to get back to nature. The peace and quiet of the bush really makes one appreciate the environment. At this time of the year, especially during current times of drought, the veld is dry and the ground hungry for water, but the rains are still far away.

We had access to water in a can and hand basin, as well as a shower, although it provided only a low-pressure trickle of water. We were pleasantly surprised at how much less water one uses under these circumstances. This experience gave me a new appreciation for how precious water really is in this country. Many of us who have running water take it for granted and forget how easy it is to abuse water usage as a result!

ACTION

Look at where you are using running water.
Apart from doing the basics required by law, what can you do NOW to save water?  These are things we should be doing all the time for the future sustainability of our planet, not only when there is a drought or low-rain situation.

If you’re stuck for ideas, check out this list of more than 100 ways to save water.  There are bound to be at least a few suggestions there that you haven’t thought of / implemented yet!

     

2.  Conference: Women in Rail and Safety

     

I highly recommend this ‘golden’ (or should I say ‘purple’?) opportunity for all women who receive my safety tips, as well as all of you who employ women in a safety role!

The speaker lineup and content has me thinking about sneaking into the venue and taking up a low profile, back row seat.

Picture: Women in Rail and Safety Conference 2016: covering workplace human factors of (1) shift work and its effects on women, (2) obesity, (3) lifestyle diseases, (4) functional capacity, (5) overall health and wellness, (6) cracked glass ceiling, (7) professionalism and ethics, (8) surviving in a male-dominated environment, (9) dealing with workplace harassment as a safety issue, (10) health and safety in the workplace.

For details and registration, you can look at the article on SHEQAfrica. Contact names and details are provided there.

FEEDBACK

Your comments and feedback are always welcome!

Contact Jürgen

LOOKING FOR SOMETHING?

Try searching for it or use the search topics feature

Search the S.H.E. ATM
Copyright: Jürgen Tietz
Terms of Use

«  prev

next  »

 

GM – World Safety and Health Day at Work 2016

++  WORLD HEALTH  &  SAFETY AT WORK DAY  +  28 April 2016  ++
Mar 2016

What is your total cost of absenteeism? I know one of your dashboard figures is most probably injuries and damages, but subtract that from the total cost of absenteeism, and you’ll find that the remainder is the cost of wellness. Now you might say: “That’s not my problem, that’s HR’s problem”, but you’d be wrong. There’s a direct link between safety and wellness: employee health -> productivity -> injuries -> absenteeism  [1].

     

WORKPLACE STRESS:

A Collective Challenge

graphic depicting workplace stress

     

Some stats:

  • Absenteeism costs the SA economy around R12-16 billion per year.
  • On average 15-30% of staff could be absent on any given day. Take your annual salary bill and do the sums!
  • One day’s absence can cost a company 3 days’ worth of salary  [2].
  • 2 out of 3 employees who fail to show up for work aren’t physically ill. There are a whole host of reasons  [2], with stress and sleep disorders being the “top cause of lost work time”.

The theme for the upcoming World Safety and Health Day, on 28 April 2016, is:

graphic showing World Day for Safety and Health at Work - 28 April 2016

The abstract below, from the ILO site  [3], details the issue of stress very nicely. Your HR / Wellness people should be able to relate to this:

Today, many workers are facing greater pressure to meet the demands of modern working life. Psychosocial risks such as increased competition, higher expectations on performance and longer working hours are contributing to the workplace becoming an ever more stressful environment. With the pace of work dictated by instant communications and high levels of global competition, the lines separating work from life are becoming more and more difficult to identify. In addition, due to the significant changes labour relations and the current economic recession, workers are experiencing organizational changes and restructuring, reduced work opportunities, increasing precarious work , the fear of losing their jobs, massive layoffs and unemployment and decreased financial stability, with serious consequences to their mental health and well-being.

And it’s not only in the office but also in the plants, as highlighted in David’s story in the DHHS publication, “Stress at Work”  [4]:

The nature of work is changing at whirlwind speed. Perhaps now more than ever before, job stress poses a threat to the health of workers and, in turn, to the health organizations. For weeks David had been plagued by aching muscles, loss of appetite, restless sleep, migraine headaches and a complete sense of exhaustion. At first he tried to ignore these problems, but eventually he became so short-tempered and irritable that his wife insisted he get a check-up. He told the doctor: ‘Since the reorganization, nobody feels safe. It used to be that as long as you did your work, you had a job. That’s not for sure anymore. They expect the same production rates even though two guys are now doing the work of three. We’re so backed up I’m working twelve-hour shifts six days a week. I swear I hear those machines humming in my sleep. Guys are calling in sick just to get a break. Morale is so bad they’re talking about bringing in some consultants to figure out a better way to get the job done.’

ACTION

Here is your chance to do something about safety and health in your workplace.

I’m not putting any pressure on you (just giving you a gentle push) … 28 April is around the corner.  It’s an ideal opportunity for you to call me in to do my presentation addressing Safety and Workplace Stress. I’m your guy!  [5]

[1]   “Absenteeism Management“, OCSA

[2]   “Causes and Costs of Absenteeism in the Workplace“, Forbes

[3]   ILO: World Day for Safety & Health at Work

[4]   “Stress at Work“, CDC, DHHS (NIOSH) Publication Number 99-101

[5]   Re-energise & sustain your safety, health & wellness efforts

FEEDBACK

Your comments and feedback are always welcome!

Contact Jürgen

LOOKING FOR SOMETHING?

Try searching for it or use the search topics feature

Search the S.H.E. ATM
Copyright: Jürgen Tietz
Terms of Use

«  prev

next  »

 

GM – VW Deception

♦♦♦   CURRENT AFFAIRS   ♦♦♦
Oct 2015

VW Deception

(Lessons About Measurement)

The VW deception[1]  is unforgivable. Yes, we should denounce this kind of behaviour and yes, heads should roll.  It leaves one discomforted, distrustful, wondering if it is happening, as yet undiscovered, in pharmaceuticals, medical care or health & hygiene, especially in food processing. (Mind you, a while back it did, with the horse meat scandal[2].)

I see this behaviour as a direct consequence of a culture where measurement becomes the end in itself and not the means to an end. It’s what happens when we ‘cook the books’ to reflect the result we are looking for, instead of assessing the results so as to ensure quality, safety, health, risk control or environmental protection. True measurement goes way beyond compliance to a minimum standard. Proper measurement is a tool for continuous improvement.

What VW did is similar to what is being done by many companies. Whenever a company ‘sets up’ or ‘spring cleans’ or ‘prepares’ just before an audit or alters statistics in order to meet audit criteria to keep the record intact … it is committing fraud by deception. It is defrauding its personnel, or the public or both.

We tend to feel quite justified in making our own amendments to figures. So did the guys directly involved at VW. But now VW is in trouble, because the company was caught out and it has customers who can vote with their wallet. As a top brand there is only one way – down.

Misrepresenting or selectively using data is a world-wide occurrence. Why did we find it necessary to put so much time and effort into the King Commission on corporate governance[3]?  Surely not because there is no problem in our backyards?

ACTION

This is between you and your conscience. Look into the mirror and ask yourself how often and by how much you adjust the figures on emissions, effluents, performance, waste, recycling, accidents, observations, near miss reporting, performance, costs … ? If you are in a leadership position, you might not be directly involved, but you are accountable for the culture which breeds this kind of behaviour in your organisation!

[1]   “Volkswagen: The scandal explained“, by Russell Hotten, BBC News, 7 October 2015

[2]   “2013 meat adulteration scandal“, from Wikipedia

[3]   “King Report on Corporate Governance“, from Wikipedia

FEEDBACK

Your comments and feedback are always welcome!

Contact Jürgen

LOOKING FOR SOMETHING?

Try searching for it or use the search topics feature

Search the S.H.E. ATM
Copyright: Jürgen Tietz
Terms of Use

«  prev

next  »

 

GM – World Day for Safety and Health at Work 2012

WORLD  DAY  for  SAFETY  and  HEALTH  at  WORK
28 April 2012
Mar 2012

 

Theme:

 Green Jobs:
Promoting Safety and Health
in a Green Economy

 The ILO celebrates its annual ‘World Day for Safety and Health at Work’ on 28 April to promote the prevention of occupational accidents and diseases globally. It is an awareness-raising campaign intended to focus international attention on emerging trends in the field of occupational safety and health and on the magnitude of work-related injuries, diseases and fatalities worldwide.

It is also the day in which the world’s trade union movement holds its International Commemoration Day for Dead and Injured Workers to honour the memory of victims of occupational accidents and diseases …

… In many parts of the world, national authorities, trade unions, employers’ organizations and safety and health practitioners organize activities to celebrate this date. We [the ILO] invite you to join us in celebrating this significant day and share with us the activities you organize. 

  This year’s theme

 … There is a shift in the world to a greener and more sustainable economy. However, even if certain jobs are considered to be “green”, the technologies used may protect the environment but not be safe at all.

… A true green job must integrate safety and health into design, procurement, operations, maintenance, sourcing and recycling policies, certification systems and OSH quality standards. This is especially relevant for sectors such as construction, waste recycling, solar energy production and biomass processing. 

Content courtesy of ILO.
More information is available on their website.

ON OFFER

If you’re planning to commemorate this day, why not download a free copy of my guide: 10 Most Common Mistakes Made When Organising an Event.

FEEDBACK

Your comments and feedback are always welcome!

Contact Jürgen

LOOKING FOR SOMETHING?

Try searching for it or use the search topics feature

Search the S.H.E. ATM
Copyright: Jürgen Tietz
Terms of Use

next  »

 

GM – Out of the Blue

♦♦♦   ROAD SAFETY   ♦♦♦

Out of the Blue

accidents are caused

I have been preaching: “Accidents don’t just happen – they are caused by someone choosing to do the wrong thing or choosing not to do the right thing“. This could be via design, maintenance, use, disposal, or an outright, deliberate choice to break the rules or to take a short cut.

But, what if you are the victim of such action, an innocent passer-by, in the wrong place at the wrong time? Here is a story of a young couple on holiday in the USA:

“Tonight we had a really, really close shave. I was driving and we’d just pulled up to a petrol station, when, I kid you not, literally a few seconds later, an out of control car came hurtling out of nowhere from the intersection, smashing us into the petrol station pump. The driver, it later turns out, was very high, drunk and out of his mind. Some very nice gentlemen from the Louisiana State Troopers got hold of and arrested him a bit later.

We got out of the car ok. Jess, being on the passenger side, is a lot more bruised than I am, but luckily no battery sparks or the like and luckily the pump’s fail-safe kicked in and the flow of petrol, except that from our car’s tank, was automatically cut off immediately.

It was very close though … the terror of having yourself and your wife slammed into a petrol pump by an oncoming car. Also, I can now fairly confidently say, never rent the cheapest cars that are short a safety feature, airbag or reinforced side door here or there; and please award a Nobel Prize for the person who invented side airbags.”

Photo showing the vehicle smashed into the fuel pump at the gas station

Accidents happen every day. The reason this particular accident touched me deeply is because the young people involved are my son and his wife.

As with so many road accidents, natural disasters / events or crime incidents, they can (and do) happen anytime, anywhere, to anyone, for no reason at all. There is little that the ‘victim’ can do about it. Well, let me rephrase that: there is little the ‘victim’ can do about preventing the random event.

You can, however, take pro-active measures to minimise the impact of an incident and the ‘luck factor’ [1]. Unfortunately, unless you’re with the Navy Seals or have access to sophisticated behaviour modification training, there is little effective training to deal with being a victim of such an event. Thinking and being aware are your best defences. Of course, there is no fail proof solution, but here are a few things we all, as individuals, can do:

ACTION

  • Think about ‘What If’ scenarios, the consequences and what you can do to minimise the risk should any of those scenarios materialise.
  • Look at your ‘Near Hits’. Ask what happened, why it happened (dig down by repeating this question a number of times) and, most importantly, what you can do to prevent it from happening again – or at least to reduce the damage or injuries.
  • Be alert to your surroundings and actions. Use the traffic light rules:
    • Be aware of your green = safe situations, like being at home and relaxing in a safe environment.
    • When leaving home and getting onto the roads your awareness level should change to amber = pay attention, slow down and look for possible danger.
    • When drawing money at an ATM or approaching a hijacking hot-spot or in a crowded area, you should be at a red level of awareness = eyes in the back of your head.
  • Don’t be merely a ‘passenger’ – speak up when you see someone taking a chance or breaking the rules, like going down the killer road of F-S-D = FATIGUE-SPEED-DEVIATION (including drink / drugs).  
    “The mirror we hold up to the person next to us is one of the most important pictures he / she will ever see.”
    — Seth Godin
  • When buying or renting or merely borrowing someone else’s stuff, consider the safety features of that piece of equipment – guarding, trips and fuses, alarms, isolation features, air bags, etc.

In a future safety tip, I will deal with due diligence, HIRA and the topic of building safety into the design of plant and equipment.

 

[1]  Luck and safety don’t belong in the same equation. You cannot drive your safety efforts by relying on luck.

RELATED MATERIAL

Taking your eye off the ball / road / task

It’s My Mistake

Road Safety – Take Safety Home

Walking the Circle of Safety

FEEDBACK

Comments & feedback are always welcome!

Contact Jürgen

LOOKING FOR SOMETHING?

Search for it / use Search Topics feature

Search the S.H.E. ATM
Copyright: Jürgen Tietz
Terms of Use

«  prev

next  »

 

GM – Bird Feeder and Squatters (WED 2015)

WORLD  ENVIRONMENT  DAY
5 June 2015
Jun 2015

BIRD FEEDER and SQUATTERS

Bird feeder in the garden in 2001 with loeries

I have been feeding wild birds for 40+ years, because I like to attract a variety of birds to my home. Unfortunately, their natural habitat is being destroyed by urban expansion. Some of the new developments plant trees, but this can never make up for all that is lost to tar and concrete.

Over the years, I have watched the number of birds decline. I used to see 5 to 10 grey Loerie birds, at one time, at the feeding station. Nowadays, I hardly ever see even one. I am now plagued by “flying rats” (feral pigeons) who squat at the feeder.

UNEP World Environment Day 2015 logo and slogan

What can you do at your company?

Planting of trees is always a good thing, but we need to reach more people, especially the next generation. We have to influence the younger ones and how they feel about the environment. One way to do this is to sponsor a competition for the kids at the schools in your area and / or the kids of your employees. Ask them to write a slogan or short paragraph of WHY and HOW we can “Save the World”.  UNEP has a list of ideas, from A to Z.

Although individual decisions may seem small in the face of global threats and trends, when billions of people join forces in common purpose, we can make a tremendous difference.
— UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon

So, even if you haven’t organized an activity for today, then Just Do Something later.   You can use my  “Do One Safety Thing Every Month”  concept:  pick out suitable ideas from the UNEP list  and set up a  “Do One Environmental Thing Every Month”  program.

FEEDBACK

Your comments and feedback are always welcome!

Contact Jürgen

LOOKING FOR SOMETHING?

Try searching for it or use the search topics feature

Search the S.H.E. ATM
Copyright: Jürgen Tietz
Terms of Use

«  prev

next  »

 

Jurgen Tietz brings you Safety: by the people, for the people
Need a keyword?

H&S Rep Workshop

H&S Rep Training
The
Not Just Any
H&S Rep Workshop
that’s for everyone.

Read about it here

Share this page

Find me on

Connect with Jurgen Tietz via FacebookConnect with Jurgen Tietz via LinkedIn

Join the revolution

Disruptive Safety
The Safety Reps Survival Guide handbook