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SCnSP – Bums on Seats

♦♦  CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Feb 2018
     

Bums on Seats

getting bums on seats at the right safety training does affect the bottom line positively

The Bottom Line

     

I’ve been thinking lately about the eternal question of the ROI (Return On Investment) for safety and safety projects in particular. My conclusion is that there is no direct ROI for safety. What one can expect is a reduction in incidents, resulting in a lowering of costs in terms of losses (medical and damages). Most industries and organisations use the rear-view-mirror approach to determine the ROI for safety projects using injuries, lives lost (fatalities) and, often, loss of reputation (safety record) as criteria.

However, the bottom line impact is not any of the above, but culture. Safety is part of the overall culture of an industry or organisation. Safety is not a stand-alone entity. Safety means doing things in a safe manner, doing it right, first time and every time, avoiding injury, loss and waste. Safety means engagement, it means ownership of the process, rules, operation and controls, amongst others. You cannot get safety right without rubbing off on other aspects of culture, like behaviours, teamwork, problem-solving, a bias towards action, productivity, quality and so on. That is why the real ROI for safety is its impact on the bottom line.

There are many ways in which the culture in an organisation is established. Leadership visibility, by living out the vision and values, especially in terms of safety, is one of the most important. Another one is education and training and, therefore, empowerment. It is imperative to get bums on seats, especially with safety training and, again, here leadership support is imperative.

At Disruptive Safety, we focus on the frontline to influence the culture, by educating and empowering H&S Reps in terms of safety.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Dr Cathy Key, for inspiring this safety tip by her use of the line “Getting Bums on Seats, the Bottom Line”.
[www.confmanager.com]

ESSENTIAL LINKS

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GM – Walking the Circle of Safety

♦♦♦  VEHICLE & CHILD SAFETY  ♦♦♦
May 2012
     

Walking the Circle of Safety

Picture depicting walking vehicular circle of safety

     

What is the Vehicular Circle of Safety?

Pretty much what it sounds like … circling your vehicle as a safety check before you drive off.

The ‘Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety’ website has a comprehensive checklist and a diagram of what to check for. Although it is directed at company vehicles, the Circle of Safety is definitely not limited to that – we all learnt about the circle check when we prepared for our driver licence tests. Ergo, this is something we should all be doing with our personal vehicles too!

Why do it?

Well, apart from the obvious, i.e. is the vehicle in a fit state to be on the road, doing this has the effect of increasing driver safety awareness. Some companies insist on the positioning of traffic cones around their vehicles so that drivers are ‘forced’ to ‘walk the circle’ as they remove the cones.

The example below is a VERY good reason for at least checking that there are no children or animals anywhere near your vehicle.

Source unknown, but thanks to Morkel for bringing it to my attention!

If you’re not already walking the Circle of Safety, why not start today? It’s the SMART thing to do.

RELATED READING

Childsafewebsite for the campaign of the Child Accident Prevention Foundation of Southern Africa (CAPFSA) and Safe Kids Worldwide

Driveway Run-over Injury Prevention Videosmade available by the New Zealand chapter of Safekids

Prediction on child road fatalities in Africa by 2015

ESSENTIAL LINKS

The Safety Guru  –  delivering your safety message powerfully, purposefully and permanently for real safety, health and wellness results

The S.H.E. ATM – search the ATM for information

Contact Jürgen – because I like to hear from you

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GM – World Day for Safety and Health at Work 2012

WORLD  DAY  for  SAFETY  and  HEALTH  at  WORK
28 April 2012
Mar 2012

 

Theme:

 Green Jobs:
Promoting Safety and Health
in a Green Economy

 The ILO celebrates its annual ‘World Day for Safety and Health at Work’ on 28 April to promote the prevention of occupational accidents and diseases globally. It is an awareness-raising campaign intended to focus international attention on emerging trends in the field of occupational safety and health and on the magnitude of work-related injuries, diseases and fatalities worldwide.

It is also the day in which the world’s trade union movement holds its International Commemoration Day for Dead and Injured Workers to honour the memory of victims of occupational accidents and diseases …

… In many parts of the world, national authorities, trade unions, employers’ organizations and safety and health practitioners organize activities to celebrate this date. We [the ILO] invite you to join us in celebrating this significant day and share with us the activities you organize. 

  This year’s theme

 … There is a shift in the world to a greener and more sustainable economy. However, even if certain jobs are considered to be “green”, the technologies used may protect the environment but not be safe at all.

… A true green job must integrate safety and health into design, procurement, operations, maintenance, sourcing and recycling policies, certification systems and OSH quality standards. This is especially relevant for sectors such as construction, waste recycling, solar energy production and biomass processing. 

Content courtesy of ILO.
More information is available on their website.

ON OFFER

If you’re planning to commemorate this day, why not download a free copy of my guide: 10 Most Common Mistakes Made When Organising an Event.

FEEDBACK

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GM – Road Safety – Year-End “Take Safety Home” Message

♦♦♦    Road Safety    ♦♦♦

Year-End Take Safety Home Message

Those of you who have been following me for some time know how passionate I am about this topic. We kill nearly ten times more people on our roads each year than ALL industrial fatalities combined in all workplaces. Chances are that if you are going to lose someone over the holiday season, it will be on the roads. This is not only via vehicle accidents – pedestrian fatalities account for approximately 40% of road-related deaths.

graphic of ambulance with money

We are able to release last year’s crime statistics in the greatest of detail so the SAPS can plan and focus on the right hot spots. But, in spite of substantial funding, the Department of Transports Road Traffic Management Corporation is unable to provide road accident statistics, because they are “reengineering the Road Traffic information collection process”. In terms of road safety, we are effectively flying blind. I cannot give you the exact figure, but I can tell you that the cost of road accidents runs into billions – we could easily build and maintain our road infrastructure if we could halve our accidents.

We all know that we cannot improve something which we are not measuring and the latest road traffic data is from 2011! We can be as concerned as we like about the current situation, but we can only influence what is within our control. Therefore, let us influence our employees to become ACTIVE SAFE road users.

There are three things which kill people on the roads ( F S D )

The first is FATIGUE. If people are tired and take their eyes off the road, the likelihood of accidents shoots up dramatically. Thus encourage the habit of taking a break and getting enough sleep before a road trip.

SPEED is the second killer. Speed reduces the opportunity to react to any unforeseen event and stay in control!

DRINKING (Drugs) is the third killer. Alcohol has a disastrous effect on your reaction time as well as staying awake and alert.

ACTION

1. Draw up your plan for the year-end now! Involve your SHE Reps in that planning – empower them to play an ACTIVE role in implementing some of the ideas below, as well as coming up with their own suggestions.
2. Road Safety Cookie
  graphic of ambulance with money This is a small hand-out to engage ALL your employees in road safety and to remind them to take a safety attitude with them when going home for the holidays.
These Road Safety Cookies™ have been specifically branded with road safety signs and the cookie inserts are road safety messages.
There are many ways to use this COOL TOOL™.
  One idea is to put the name(s) of employees killed during the year in road accidents on the back of the cookie inserts eg. + IN MEMORY OF +
I will assist you with customisation to meet your specific needs.
More ideas
on how to use the Safety Cookies here.
3. Road Safety Toolbox Talks. I am offering this series of 6 CD’s at a special discount of R2,750. These CD’s are part of my COOL TOOL™ Toolbox Talks and cover the Road Safety Topics of Seat Belts, Attitude, Road Signs, Pedestrians and vehicles – download the overview.
3. Advanced Driving Safety Rules. Get your SHE Reps to hand out a leaflet, with advanced driving tips, to everyone leaving your premises when taking their year-end break.
If you need ideas for this, send me an email.
4. Look at activities you can sponsor at schools in your neighbourhood, for example driving lessons or driving simulators for schools.

RELATED MATERIAL

A Hong Kong movie theatre asks its patrons to leave their cell phones ON when they enter the movie house. Using that, Volkswagen made an eye opening advertisement.

Have you been tagged?
Caught at a road block
Taking your eye off the ball / road / task
Walking the circle of safety
Safety misconceptions – what we can learn from them
Manslaughter or murder?

REFERENCE MATERIAL

  • RTMC latest annual report is 2012- 2013. (If you look at Section 8, in particular the part which reviews the achievement of their strategic objective “improve collection of data” on page 56, you will find that they did not achieve KPI 32 = State of Road Safety Report. The financials are in Section 9 on page 71.)
  • Arrive Alive has no up to date info either – last report is 2011.

FEEDBACK

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SCnSP – Have You Been Tagged – State of Pedestrian Safety

♦♦♦    SAFETY CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE    ♦♦♦

In this series, I share with you my thoughts on Why Safety Is An Issue For Most Companies. One of the Things We Must Address If We Want To Improve Our Safety Performance is to review the state of pedestrian safety inside our company premises as well as surrounding communities and take action to reduce pedestrian fatalities.

picture of the Decade of Action for Road Safety tag

Have
You
Been
Tagged?

 

State of Pedestrian Safety

picture of the Decade of Action for Road Safety tag

NEWS FLASH    NEWS FLASH    NEWS FLASH    NEWS FLASH

24 June 2014
“A cyclist is fighting for his life after he was hit by a car on the R102 …”

22 June 2014
“A pedestrian is in a critical condition after he was knocked down on Hendrik Potgieter Rd …”

21 June 2014
“Man in a critical condition after he was knocked over by a construction vehicle.”

Enough? No?

31 May 2014
“A man was critically injured after he was hit by a car along Ballito Drive.”

27 May 2014
“54-year-old woman tragically lost her life after she was knocked over by a motor vehicle.”

26 Apr 2014
“A 29-year-old male pedestrian was killed at the M1 and M2 interchange in Booysens …”

Still not enough? Well, it is for me!

So, are you willing to be tagged?

The real tag I’m referring to will cost you effort, time and possibly even money … but it will be worth it, if you believe that life is priceless.

Watch this video, then read on.

snapshot of the video entitled The Long Short Walk

We’re almost halfway through the UN Decade of Action for Road Safety, which was officially launched 11 May 2011 via a resolution supported by 100 countries. This resolution was subsequently adopted by the UN General Assembly on 10 April this year.

The official aim of the Decade of Action is to stabilise and then reduce global road traffic fatalities by 2020. Making it real, the aim is to save 5 million lives.

Globally, road traffic incidents rank 8th as a cause of death.

But, they are the leading cause of death for people between the ages of 15 and 29.

Horrific stats.  That’s our younger generation.

Delving deeper, globally, pedestrian deaths amount to 22% of all road deaths every year – that’s over 270,000 people. Pedestrian fatalities in the African Region are sitting at 38%.

In South Africa, between 35-37% of all road fatalities are pedestrian fatalities.

If no effective action has been taken since 2011, then the forecast figures indicate that this year the figure of 270,000 will have increased to 330,000 by now.

South Africa launched the Arrive Alive Road Safety Campaign in 1997.
The RTMC is running a 365 Days Road Safety Campaign and published their revised Strategic Plan for the next 5 years in March.

Are these initiatives working?

At the 82nd UN Assembly (2013), Jeremiah Mamabolo said that the Arrive Alive Road Safety Campaign “had resulted in a drastic reduction in the number of deaths from accidents and sharpened the response of law enforcement agencies and health services.”

You can read all about the RTMC’s progress related to the “5 Pillars for the Decade of Action for Road Safety” in their latest annual report, and decide for yourself.

Like it or not, the fact remains that it is up to each and every individual to take responsibility for road safety.
Why not start with pedestrian safety?

♦ As individuals, we can ensure that we have not “gardened” up the paving areas outside our homes to the point where pedestrians are forced to walk in the street.

♦ As responsible citizens, we can ensure our communal areas and company premises are safe for pedestrians.

ACTION

  • Do a survey of pedestrian safety inside your company premises, including inside buildings. Are there enough walkways, clearly demarcated / barricaded off, for people to walk safely?
  • Look for places where people are NOT using the walk ways and establish why short cuts are being taken. Ask people, don’t make assumptions. Is it a matter of education / policing / discipline?
  • Go to your surrounding communities and look for opportunities to help with pedestrian safety, especially around schools. Can your company sponsor Zebra crossings, side walks, or anything else which can show your community that you do care.
  • Draw up a home safety flyer / cartoon brochure for your employees to take home and to distribute at schools to highlight the risks and safe behaviour. Or get posters that Arrive Alive and the RTMC have designed.
  • Share “The Long Short Walk” video with others and “tag” your people.

REFERENCE MATERIAL

Global Plan for Decade of Action for Road Safety & its 5 Pillars:
   Road Safety Fund material
   WHO material

Decade of Action for Road Safety tags

Pedestrian Safety WHO Manual (publ 2013)

National plan of action for South Africa:
   2011 strategy document
   2014 revised strategy plan

Global Status Report on Road Safety 2013

Reports for South Africa:
   Stats for South Africa that were used for Global Status Report
   Stats from Arrive Alive South Africa
   RTMC Annual Report 2012-2013

News excerpts

Graphics courtesy of  Decade for Action tags  &  Make Roads Safe

KEY DATES TO DIARISE

16 November 2014 (annually, 3rd Sunday of November):  World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims

4-10 May 2015:  Third UN Global Road Safety Week

2015 (details TBA):  Second Global Ministerial Conference on Road Safety (to be held in Brazil)

ADDITIONAL LINKS

Campaign brochure:  Safe Roads for All

Pedestrian Safety Advice:  from Arrive Alive South Africa online

Zenani Mandela Campaign

FEEDBACK

Your feedback and comments are always welcome! Drop me a line!

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Walking the Circle of Safety

 

What is the Vehicular Circle of Safety?

Pretty much what it sounds like … circling your vehicle as a safety check before you drive it.

The ‘Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety’ website has a comprehensive checklist and a diagram of what to check for. Although it is directed at company vehicles, the Circle of Safety is definitely not limited to that – we all learnt about the circle check when we prepared for our driver licence tests. Ergo, this is something we should all be doing with our personal vehicles too!

Why do it?

Well, apart from the obvious, i.e. is the vehicle in a fit state to be on the road, doing this has the effect of increasing driver safety awareness. Some companies insist on the positioning of traffic cones around their vehicles so that drivers are ‘forced’ to ‘walk the circle’ as they remove the cones.

 

The example below is a VERY good reason for at least checking that there are no children or animals anywhere near your vehicle.

Source unknown, but thanks to Morkel for bringing it to my attention!

Some material worth looking at:

If you’re not already walking the Circle of Safety, why not start today? It’s the SMART thing to do.

 Be safe – the SIMPLY SMART way,

Jürgen

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Lala Kamnandi (Good Night)

We say “Lala Kamnandi” to each other.

Why do we have this habit in most cultures? It’s because sleep is important – to rejuvenate our spirits and recharge our batteries. Without proper sleep, we end up fatigued, frustrated and exhausted. 

This is a real risk in safety

When driving a vehicle or operating a critical machine, we have to be fully awake and alert all the time. Taking our eyes off the road (or ball) for even a few seconds can spell disaster. 

Apart from the safety issues, sleep also has a direct influence on our health. So often when people are asked “How are you?”, the reply is “Tired”, or they complain about back pain. 

Most of us spend 25%-35% of each day sleeping. So does it not stand to reason that we should take care of how and where we sleep? “How you make your bed, that’s how you will lie” is an old saying which holds very true. Just look at a dog settling down to sleep.     🙂

Many people will pay a fortune for their multi-media centers and lounge suites. … Hmmm. … Actually, for some, the investment in a TV couch makes good sense, since they spend many hours watching TV.     😉

Seriously though, we should rather spend more money on our beds and mattresses so that we can get a great night’s sleep, every night. 

One  area, where sleep deprivation and fatigue is a major cause of fatalities, is our roads. Many people get killed because of “losing control” = dozing off and closing their eyes for a few seconds. This was also mentioned by Minister Ndebele as one of the reasons why SA ranks third highest in road deaths globally. If you or your employees spend alot of time on the road, it might be worth investing in a fatigue warning system, like this nifty device – a Driver State Sensor (DSS) by BOOYCO

ACTION: Take a good look at your bed. If the mattress is older than 5 years, you should consider replacing it. The technology of beds and mattresses has evolved alot in the last few years, so make an investment in your sleep and health. Also make sure that you get enough rest each night, and “vuka vusa” (wake up, rise up) refreshed, every morning.

 Be safe – the SIMPLY SMART way,

Jürgen

ps. Ask me about my ROAD SAFETY COOL TOOL™ TOOLBOX TALKS – a 5 CD set. 

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