Search Results for: Habit

SM – Can behaviour and habits be unlearned?

♦♦♦    SAFETY MATTERS    ♦♦♦
Aug 2018
     

Behaviour and Habits

you can teach an old dog new tricks

     

There is a misconception in “safety” circles that poor or unsafe behaviour or habits can be “unlearned”. Untrue. The sad reality is that, once your brain has made the links and formed the pattern, i.e. you have mastered the skill or developed the habit, it’s there to stay.

Trying to wipe out a behaviour or habit is like trying to “unlearn” a language, talking, or walking. You can’t. What you can do is to learn a new skill / behaviour / habit and work on the triggers which will make it dominant, so that your brain automatically chooses that new skill / behaviour / habit. For a while, this will entail a conscious effort to suppress the old one. If you “get on the OLD bike”, the old skill / behaviour / habit will come back to you.

The saying: “You can’t teach an old dog new tricks” is not true, but it is much harder to “overwrite the old tricks”.

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SCnSP – Without A Safety Clue

♦♦  CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Mar 2018
     

Without a Safety Clue

(Urgent vs Important)

Habits and planning

     

A sailboat without a sail might float. For a long time, in fact.
But without a sail, it can’t go anywhere, can’t fulfill its function.
Floating is insufficient. [1]

This brilliant little statement clearly defines the difference between success and failure in any endeavour, but especially in SAFETY. Good safety is not merely compliance, which is the bare minimum (floating). Good safety requires making time for the IMPORTANT stuff (setting your sails), i.e. making time for ACTIONS which will make a difference, which will grow the team, which are PRO-ACTIVE. Successful teams have developed the HABIT of doing this really well. Efficient teams know how to deal with the urgent stuff, quickly and effectively, so as to make time for constantly moving safety to a new level – to a DISRUPTIVE SAFETY™ level. By the way, educating and empowering your H&S Reps is part of “setting the sails”.

Picture: Disruptive safety call to action icon

  • Ask a simple question: “Is this urgent or is it important?”
    Don’t fall into the trap of labelling everything as urgent and important!
  • The acid test is another simple question: “So what?” … So what if this doesn’t get done today, now, or not at all?
    If you don’t have a convincing answer to this question, it might be urgent, but definitely not important.
  • Finally, ask: “Is this a new problem or is it an old problem?”
    Old problems tend to appear to be urgent simply because they have never been dealt with in an easy way!
    Be ruthless with old problems – kill them once and for all.

Our handbook, The Safety Rep’s Survival Guide, deals with this important habit in a number of topics.

[1]   Godin, Seth. “Without a Sail”, May 2017. http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2017/05/without-a-sail.html

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SCnSP – The Snooze Button

♦♦  CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Jan 2018
     

The  Snoo-zzz-zzz-e  Button

Delaying action

clock ticking countdown tick-tock

     

Growing up in Namibia, I spent many of my holidays on my grandparents’ farm, which is in the arid areas of the country. There was no electricity and every drop of water had to be pumped from a borehole. This didn’t worry my grandfather in the least. Regardless of the season, he was up every morning before sunrise, when the old cuckoo clock struck four, and in the kitchen making coffee, before heading out to attend to the work of the day.

He didn’t press a snooze button. In fact, I doubt he ever set an alarm clock. His motto was: “Today, Not Tomorrow”. He knew that when it’s time to plough, that’s what you do, because the rains don’t have a snooze button. The same went for the cows. When they came into the kraal in the early morning, it was milking time. No hitting the snooze button.

The snooze button is an invention which encourages the poor habit of delaying unavoidable action. Pressing the snooze button buys one a few extra minutes’ sleep, but doesn’t make a difference in the long run. Instead of hitting the ground running, we fall prey to this folly of delayed action, which often results in things taking longer in the end. Every time we choose “I-can-do-that-later”, we waste time picking up the thread and re-focussing.

In safety, there are a number of things that, like the rain and milking cows, don’t have a snooze button. Opportunity and risk are two examples. Opportunity normally has a short timeframe and if you press snooze, in most cases, you will lose. The expression: “There will always be another opportunity” is loser’s language. The same goes for risk. Once you have identified it, you have to deal with it, because you can’t put a risky situation on hold. Actually, if you don’t take swift action you will likely create an even bigger risk by breeding complacency.

Picture: Disruptive safety call to action icon

Take time NOW to think about your personal snooze buttons.

Questions you can ask yourself:

  • What (and why) will you put off this year?
  • How often do you say to yourself: “I don’t have time now, I’ll do it later”?
  • How often do you allow your work to be disrupted?
  • How frequently do you allow yourself to be distracted from what you are busy with?
  • Have you ever taken note of how many times you use your Inbox, or phones, or meetings as snooze buttons, thereby delaying making decisions, taking charge, seizing an opportunity and choosing to take action?

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SCnSP – When is the safety battle won?

♦♦  CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Jul 2017
     

When Is The Safety Battle Won?

Engaging hearts and minds

Heart = OwnershipMind = Commitment

     

Many centuries ago, a Roman general was leading his legions towards the enemy in a swampy country. He knew that the next day’s battle would be fought on a certain plain because it was the only dry, flat place for miles. He pushed his army all night, marching them through a frightening and formidable swamp, so that they reached the battle site before the enemy and could claim the high ground.

In the aftermath of victory, the general called his troops together and asked them, “Brothers, when did we win the battle?”
One captain replied, “Sir, when the infantry attacked.”
Another said, “Sir, we won when the cavalry broke through.”
“No,” said the general. “We won the battle the night before – when our men marched through that swamp and took the high ground.” [1]

So, when is the SAFETY battle won?

Not when the rubber hits the road, or the airplane is at cruising height, or the construction is in progress, or the plant is operating on full steam. Not by analysing the statistics, reporting ‘near misses’ and investigating incidents. Not by paperwork and audits. Not by being reactive.

No … because by then it’s too late. All you can do then is police for compliance. I mean, can you imagine if the general in the above story had used that approach – having to check (audit) that his troops are actually fighting and using the correct combat tactics, rather than leading them in battle?

No. The safety battle is won long before any of the items mentioned above. It is won when we manage to get safety into the hearts and minds of all our people. It is won when we have succeeded in getting people to make safety a habit, in everything they do. Before they tackle each task, while they’re carrying out the task and after they’ve completed the task. It is won when the safety ABC is in place – individual safety Attitude, Behaviour, Choice. It is won when our people are no longer complying out of fear of being caught and disciplined or because the boss is watching. The safety battle is won when our people are thinking ‘Safety Assurance’ as part of the preparation for everything they do. It is won when individual perceptions of risk include thinking about consequences.

Finally, the safety battle is won when we all are looking at continuous improvement and best practices and sharing how to work smarter and safer. It is won when our people are not afraid of failing and treat every ‘near hit’ as an opportunity to improve productivity and safety.

Picture: Disruptive safety call to action icon

As safety professionals, we should strive to support the business by improving productivity safely!
We should be the first port of call when people are thinking of taking a shortcut or reporting a ‘near hit’ or ‘failure’. And it should be because they know and trust that we will help them do it safely, instead of blaming, and crucifying them for pushing the boundaries.
Safety Always.

[1]   Pressfield, Steven. The Warrior Ethos. Black Irish Entertainment LLC (2011). 978-1936891009.

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SM – Mother’s Rules

♦♦♦    SAFETY MATTERS    ♦♦♦
Aug 2009
     

Mother’s Rules

     

The term health, safety and environment (HS&E) is used widely. We appoint HS&E, SHE, or H&S Representatives, but the quality of the ‘H’ component of our management systems is often very low.

At some of the companies that I have visited, heath and hygiene does not really feature in the agenda or the actions of management, representatives or workers, except in the HS&E policy pasted on the walls.

Would you like to be operated on in a hospital where the ‘H’ does not feature? I often see personal protective equipment (PPE) that could not protect the wearer and has even become a health risk in itself!

This self-imposed risk is especially true for the way that some workers treat their disposable PPE, like disposable ear plugs, disposable dust masks and gloves. Imagine your surgeon using soiled rubber gloves and contaminated face masks. Or imagine re-using condoms. No surgeon and no informed worker would do such things, yet some workers used soiled respirators and breathe contaminated air into their lungs!

disposable dust mask being reused

Workers should take good care of all their PPE. Disposable PPE should not be stored once it becomes dirty. Workers, supervisors, managers and HS&E specialists should discuss the long-term health risks of exposure to hazards like dust, bright light, low light, noise and hazardous chemicals. Where they do not have enough reliable information, they should call on specialists to provide information. Suppliers, hygienists and occupational health staff would be glad to assist.

Where workers, supervisors, managers and specialists find that they do not all agree on the nature or level of the risk, or on the best course for preventing loss, they should likewise call on specialists and investigate the occupational health issues until they reach agreement at all levels of the organisation.

Ten House Rules

To help raise awareness about health and hygiene, ‘H’, I use a cake of soap with Mother’s Rules printed on the wrapping:

Mother's Rules

These are basic ‘house rules’ about health that everyone should have learnt at home. Everyone, except mothers, tends to forget the rules from time to time. Perhaps mothers like repeating these rules because only fools would argue with them! Workers are legally obliged to follow health and hygiene rules.

Employers, like mothers, have many obligations too. Employers have to assess health risks and supply the soap and other appropriate cleaning material. They have to ensure a work environment free from health risks.

Health and hygiene management may be a matter of minor or mildly serious infections at home, but at work it could be a matter of serious infection, fatal exposure, or long-term exposure resulting in chronic disease.

Mothers use common sense to train young people how to avoid hazards at home. At work, the hazards are larger, more complex and there are more of them. Workers should not make the mistake of believing that common sense alone will save them from harm.

Employers have to make a special and continuous effort to find hazards, assess the risk to workers and visitors, make workers aware of the pathways of exposure, teach them how to avoid harm and provide the right PPE at the places and times where some exposure cannot be avoided.

Workers have the legal obligation to learn and follow these occupational health procedures. Where workers ‘forget’ or ignore the ‘house rules’, employers are dutybound to use discipline – in the spirit of love – just like mothers do!

Full PPE (1)Full PPE (2)

Operators wearing full PPE

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SCnSP – Are you a safety professional?

♦♦  CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Jan 2017
     

Are you a Safety Professional?

Your bookshelf reveals all

Picture: The Safety Rep's Bookshelf

     

As a student, I was in residence with the De Vynck family. To this day, I still remember Dr. de Vynck’s study vividly. Two of the walls were covered with bookshelves from floor to ceiling and the shelves were filled with books. The study smelt like a library – it had the smell of knowledge and wisdom. But this was not just a pretty display of books. Dr. de Vynck had read them all. He could pull a book off the shelf, open it and quote a relevant section on the topic under discussion. He was a true professional.

What does your bookshelf look like?

Maybe I should first have asked if you have a bookshelf and, if yes, what does it say about you? Have you read the books, or are you merely practising ‘shelf-development’? When I meet people for the first time, I prefer to do it at their offices so that I can look at what is on the walls and what is on the bookshelves – to see who they are. This picture, to me, speaks volumes! By the way, I always start my inspections with the safety manager’s office!

What have you written?

I’m not talking about rules and procedures, standards and instructions, or emails. What I mean is: What insights and observations, in safety, have you made and shared with other people, on a regular basis? There is nothing that deepens your understanding of something more than when you share it in writing!

My third question

How would you feel if your doctor, lawyer, engineer or any other professional who provides you with a personal service, didn’t stay up to date with the latest developments in his field of expertise by, amongst other things, reading books (by ‘books’ I also mean articles, magazines and the like)?

If your answers are negative, then you need to ask yourself if you are truly a Safety Professional, especially if you work in a consultative role. Now I know we all have valid reasons as to why we can’t read or write ‘books’. Time is always at the top of the excuse list even though we always manage to make time for what is important to us. If self-development is important to you, you will make time to read and write.

On bookshelves

Instead of the traditional bookshelf, you could go for a digital bookshelf, i.e. have articles of interest, videos and images, especially photos, stored on your computer. These should be filed in such a way that any one of them can be easily found when you want to refer back to it. This is what I call good digital housekeeping, with ‘a place for everything and everything in its place’. I have over 14,000 photos, 42,000 files, all named and catalogued in some 2200 folders. I can find information at the click of a button, when using my search function. It goes without saying that, in order to build up an online library, you have to read and write online. There are many platforms to do this effectively and LinkedIn, Facebook and Google Alerts are just a few.

By the way … I practise what I preach. This article was inspired by one of Seth Godin’s posts [1].

Picture: Disruptive safety call to action icon

  • Take a look around your office now and make a call about your ‘bookshelf’.
  • Look at your online library. Is it a bin or is it a labelled filing cabinet?
  • Write or share something now, preferably adding your own, fresh insights. Make it a habit, not a flash in the pan.

[1]   Seth Godin, “Fully Baked”. 2016.

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The Safety Rep’s Survival Guide

 

Picture: The Safety Rep's Survival Guide

The Safety Rep’s Survival Guide is a unique tool
in the form of a handbook with supporting material
which transforms passive H&S Reps
into passionate and active H&S Reps
by means of education and empowerment.

In a world of disruptive change
we need Disruptive Safety™.

To reduce incidents and prevent injuries
we bring you the whY factor
to move the ELEPHANT
to get your people to own safety
by engaging in the Just Doing Something Safe™ daily habit.

This D.I.Y. handbook is the solution to the industry-wide problem of H&S Reps not playing a meaningful, proactive role in safety.

Picture: The Safety Rep's Survival GuidePicture: The Safety Rep's Survival Guide

  • 10 sections, covering 88 topics, including how to be an H&S Rep, the law in English, self-help, being proactive, behaviour, teamwork and problem-solving, in over 200 pages.
  • Fully illustrated with 80 full colour high-quality drawings, using ANTZI, the metaphor of the ant.
  • Fun, interesting, educational, empowering.
  • Written in easy to understand English, with an extensive glossary, FAQ, self-test questions and a facilitation guide.
  • Access to a web site with over 100 “How To” guidelines.

 

 

For more information or to order this indispensable handbook:

D1STEM – The New Normal

♦ SERIES ♦    DO ONE SAFETY THING EACH MONTH    ♦ SERIES ♦
Aug 2016

THE NEW NORMAL:

For worse … or for better?

Picture: Quote: Steven Covey: Leave the world a better place

The senseless killing we have seen over the last couple of years seems to be getting worse and worse. Now anyone (even teenagers) with one or other ideology or grievance and a gun, knife or explosives seems to think it’s okay to follow these “acts of terror” examples that are being set by groups and lone wolves. I can’t predict the future, but I fear it’s going to get much, much worse before we see an end to it. I don’t think there’s an instant solution. Even world leaders are at a loss as to what to do.

As unfortunate and worrying as this situation is, it needs to be put into perspective. The reality is that, in spite of the horror, these attacks remain isolated and involve the killing of a few people, not unlike lightning strikes. Without in any way downplaying or ignoring the pain suffered by the families and friends of those affected, I have to say that the way the media report on these events, you’d think we’re dealing with hurricane Katrina, which, by the way, caused hundreds of deaths and untold destruction. I’m not an advocate of SABC-like censorship, but some “breaking news” broadcasts tend to distort our perception of reality and significance. Another example in this category are air crashes. The number of deaths caused there pales into insignificance when compared to the approximately 3,500 people killed daily, worldwide, on our roads [1]. That reality isn’t making the headlines often enough, which says to me that we have just grown to accept that this is the way it has to be.

I don’t believe there are magical solutions to any of these problems. However, I am a strong believer in concentrating on your circle of influence, rather than your circle of concern [2]. So, my link to safety is this: Let’s not spend too much time pondering and discussing what we can’t change. Rather, let’s focus on the “everyday” mass killers – the road accidents and fatigue, HIV/AIDS, TB, diabetes, malaria, stress and depression (suicides), and the like. These are wellness issues where we can make a difference, right now. With the right life skills training at schools, I’m confident that we can re-establish a culture of tolerance amongst our children. Let this be our “new normal”.

ACTION

This month, look into how much effort, time and money you are directing towards wellness education at your company and in your community. A little can go a long way to making a real difference and showing that you care. It’s also well within your circle of influence and nothing is stopping you from spending a good portion of your budget on wellness [3].

[1]  “Number of road traffic deaths”, WHO 2013 GHO Data.
[2]  “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People”, Steven Covey.
[3]  Green Card (recognition) goes out to Assmang Khumani Mine (and Susan Fourie in particular), for doing just that with their Peer Educator’s TB play.
[Picture]  Source: wikicourses.wikispaces.com

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SCnSP – Your Call Is Important To Me

♦♦  SAFETY CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Mar 2016

Phone etiquette is key to customer relations and, with the proliferation of ACD & IVR switchboards and mobile phones, it has evolved.  Has your corporate culture kept pace?

     

YOUR CALL IS IMPORTANT TO ME

(Mobile) Connectivity

graphic depicting caller on the phone

     

The number you have called is not available. Please try again later.

I can’t take your call right now, I’m in a meeting.

I’m not available at the moment, but please leave your name and number, and I will call you back, as soon as possible!

My personal favourite: “Your call is important to us. Please hold for the next available consultant“, followed by Beethoven’s 9th Symphony alternating with advertising / information messages … over and over and over again.

And let’s not forget this important message: “For Quality and Training purposes your call may be recorded“. For heavens’ sake … If quality was important to them they would answer my darned call and not put me in a queue for ages! [1]

I’ve heard these and similar voice messages a hundred times, or more, and every time I asked myself: Really? Is the client really important to you? Are you really not available, or just in another meeting? Or is it just a question of you being unable to prioritise the urgent and important stuff?

Recently, for one of my projects, I tried to contact about 30 people. I say ‘tried’ because 80% of them couldn’t be reached on their mobile number and either don’t listen to their voicemail or don’t return calls. Why are we sitting with this endemic corporate sickness?

At one stage, I used to say to myself (as I’m sure many still do): “I am busy, if YOUR call is important to YOU, then you can call ME back!” That changed radically when I became self-employed. Every missed call is now, for me, a missed opportunity. Even when I am in a meeting, I will take a call from my wife, Heidi.

One of the reasons for carrying a mobile phone is instant connectivity. Even if circumstances dictate that you can’t immediately take a call (driving is a good example), you should still acknowledge the call by phoning the person back later.

ACTION

  1. Listen to your own message. What is it telling others about you, or your company? Turn the tables and try to see it from the caller’s perspective.
  2. Ask yourself: If I were self-employed, how would I deal with my phone calls? “Call back later” may be interpreted to mean that you are not interested, potentially losing you a business opportunity.
  3. Don’t use an auto responder unless you absolutely have to. Acknowledge the call. This doesn’t mean you have to take the call and enter into a long conversation. It means taking the initiative by offering to phone back or asking the caller to phone you at a certain time.
  4. Don’t use a term like ‘as soon as possible’. Make it a habit to follow up on missed calls and call-backs daily.
  5. Look at the 80/20 rule. 80% of people who call you on a regular basis probably need an urgent decision or want to share information with you. Ask yourself why? Has it got something to do with the way you manage and empower people? It’s your call!

[1]    Rod Jones, of Contact Centre Consulting CC

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SCnSP – Power of the List

♦♦  SAFETY CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦

In this series, I share with you my thoughts on Why Safety Is An Issue For Most Companies and the Things We Must Address If We Want To Improve Our Safety Performance. Today I remind you of a habit you shouldn’t allow to die.

Power of the List

(Urgent vs Important – The Story of Priorities)

graphic detailing points of wisdom regarding habits

“  The next thing you do today will be the most important thing on your agenda, because, after all, you’re doing it next. Well, perhaps it will be the most urgent thing. Or the easiest. In fact, the most important thing probably isn’t even on your agenda.  ”  —  Seth Godin, The Most Important Thing

I fully agree with this statement.

We have stopped using lists, in particular To Do lists. Nowadays, with computers and smart phones, what we should do often gets lost due to information overload / noise. Despite the conveniences and wonderful tools and apps these machines provide, information is getting ‘lost’ and no longer visible. We allow their power to disable us – we rely on machines which are not able to think (at least not yet!).

The power of lists lies in the “3 F‘s”:

Writing out a list forces us to Focus on what is important and has to be done next.
A list, used effectively, compels us to Finish what we start.
We get Fulfilment from ‘crossing out’ completed items.

All of these are highly visible, making keeping lists a most worthwhile habit to cultivate.
Using lists requires the habits of discipline and diligence. What is important is to keep the To Do list short, simple, relevant and realistic. Focus on the most important things you shouldn’t forget to do today. (Urgent matters will appear on your doorstep all on their own – you don’t have to keep a list for those!)

The same principles apply to checklists.

Would you want to fly in an aircraft where the team in the cockpit is not using pre-flight checklists that are simple, relevant and focused on the important things for take-off and a safe flight?

ACTION

  • Look at your personal habits of getting important things done and reconsider using the good old, tested and trusted To Do list.
  • Examine your “pre-flight” / start-up checklists. Do they focus on the critical items or are they complicated and cluttered with unnecessary information?

RELATED MATERIAL

Circle of safety

Who Am I? (Make it a habit)

Pen to Paper (Safety on a shoe string)

“Waiting at the Doctor’s – Time & Priorities” – from the book Life EduAction by Jürgen Tietz

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