Search Results for: Home Safety

GM – Road Safety – A Year-End “Take Safety Home” Message 2 – Let’s Save Lives

♦♦♦    Road Safety    ♦♦♦

Year-End Take Safety Home Message #2

The problem of texting whilst driving is of such concern to me that I simply must send a plea for driver mindfulness, not only for year-end, but for every day!

Let’s Save Lives

It’s a toss-up, nowadays, as to which is the more important message: “Don’t Drink & Drive” or “Don’t Text & Drive” or should we now say “Don’t Drink & Text & Drive” ?

But, since the former is virtually a cliché these days, my plea revolves around cell phone usage whilst driving (which even sober drivers are inclined to do).

graphic of vidclip snapshot with link to vidclip You may have already heard of or watched this documentary, “From One Second To The Next” by Werner Herzog. It’s about texting and driving. But if you haven’t seen it, it’s worth checking out. The documentary is well done and drives home in a personal way the pain and anguish texting and driving can cause.
graphic of vidclip snapshot with link to vidclip Mobile (cell phone) use is now the leading cause of death behind the wheel.

ACTION

Organise safety sessions to be held just before the majority of personnel take to the roads for their year-end break. Show them the video clips and hand out Road Safety Cookies to bring the message home.

RELATED MATERIAL

Road Safety – Year-End “Take Safety Home” Message
Manslaughter or murder?

ON OFFER

Road Safety Cookies

graphic of Road Safety Cookie with stop road sign

Unusual (and tasty) handouts to bring the Road Safety message home to your personnel and their families. They are branded with road safety signs and the cookie inserts contain road safety messages. They can be customised to suit your needs. One idea is to make up a small parcel of Road Safety cookies for each employee to “Take Safety Home” for the holidays.Road Safety Cookies™ have been specifically branded with road safety signs and the cookie inserts are road safety messages.
There are many ways to use this COOL TOOL™.

FEEDBACK

As always, I welcome your comments and feedback!

Copyright: Jürgen Tietz
Terms of Use

«  prev

next  »

 

GM – Road Safety – Year-End “Take Safety Home” Message

♦♦♦    Road Safety    ♦♦♦

Year-End Take Safety Home Message

Those of you who have been following me for some time know how passionate I am about this topic. We kill nearly ten times more people on our roads each year than ALL industrial fatalities combined in all workplaces. Chances are that if you are going to lose someone over the holiday season, it will be on the roads. This is not only via vehicle accidents – pedestrian fatalities account for approximately 40% of road-related deaths.

graphic of ambulance with money

We are able to release last year’s crime statistics in the greatest of detail so the SAPS can plan and focus on the right hot spots. But, in spite of substantial funding, the Department of Transports Road Traffic Management Corporation is unable to provide road accident statistics, because they are “reengineering the Road Traffic information collection process”. In terms of road safety, we are effectively flying blind. I cannot give you the exact figure, but I can tell you that the cost of road accidents runs into billions – we could easily build and maintain our road infrastructure if we could halve our accidents.

We all know that we cannot improve something which we are not measuring and the latest road traffic data is from 2011! We can be as concerned as we like about the current situation, but we can only influence what is within our control. Therefore, let us influence our employees to become ACTIVE SAFE road users.

There are three things which kill people on the roads ( F S D )

The first is FATIGUE. If people are tired and take their eyes off the road, the likelihood of accidents shoots up dramatically. Thus encourage the habit of taking a break and getting enough sleep before a road trip.

SPEED is the second killer. Speed reduces the opportunity to react to any unforeseen event and stay in control!

DRINKING (Drugs) is the third killer. Alcohol has a disastrous effect on your reaction time as well as staying awake and alert.

ACTION

1. Draw up your plan for the year-end now! Involve your SHE Reps in that planning – empower them to play an ACTIVE role in implementing some of the ideas below, as well as coming up with their own suggestions.
2. Road Safety Cookie
  graphic of ambulance with money This is a small hand-out to engage ALL your employees in road safety and to remind them to take a safety attitude with them when going home for the holidays.
These Road Safety Cookies™ have been specifically branded with road safety signs and the cookie inserts are road safety messages.
There are many ways to use this COOL TOOL™.
  One idea is to put the name(s) of employees killed during the year in road accidents on the back of the cookie inserts eg. + IN MEMORY OF +
I will assist you with customisation to meet your specific needs.
More ideas
on how to use the Safety Cookies here.
3. Road Safety Toolbox Talks. I am offering this series of 6 CD’s at a special discount of R2,750. These CD’s are part of my COOL TOOL™ Toolbox Talks and cover the Road Safety Topics of Seat Belts, Attitude, Road Signs, Pedestrians and vehicles – download the overview.
3. Advanced Driving Safety Rules. Get your SHE Reps to hand out a leaflet, with advanced driving tips, to everyone leaving your premises when taking their year-end break.
If you need ideas for this, send me an email.
4. Look at activities you can sponsor at schools in your neighbourhood, for example driving lessons or driving simulators for schools.

RELATED MATERIAL

A Hong Kong movie theatre asks its patrons to leave their cell phones ON when they enter the movie house. Using that, Volkswagen made an eye opening advertisement.

Have you been tagged?
Caught at a road block
Taking your eye off the ball / road / task
Walking the circle of safety
Safety misconceptions – what we can learn from them
Manslaughter or murder?

REFERENCE MATERIAL

  • RTMC latest annual report is 2012- 2013. (If you look at Section 8, in particular the part which reviews the achievement of their strategic objective “improve collection of data” on page 56, you will find that they did not achieve KPI 32 = State of Road Safety Report. The financials are in Section 9 on page 71.)
  • Arrive Alive has no up to date info either – last report is 2011.

FEEDBACK

Your feedback and comments are always welcome! Drop me a line!

Copyright: Jürgen Tietz
Terms of Use

«  prev

next  »

 

GM Are you serious about safety at home?

♦♦♦     HOME SAFETY     ♦♦♦

ARE YOU SERIOUS ABOUT SAFETY AT HOME?

THE ISSUE

95% of employees do not take safety home and / or take safety at home seriously. This includes road safety.

PROBABLE CAUSES

  • Employees’ attitude towards safety is a “consequence” attitude, i.e.
    I  ‘GOTO’  instead of  I  ‘WANTO’  do safety – because I believe it is the right thing to do.
  • Employees see safety as an issue that concerns them only when at work. Once they leave the factory / mine gate, different safety standards kick in.
  • Companies spend virtually no money and effort on home safety, i.e. % of safety budget spent directly on improving safety outside the gate = ZERO.
  • We – the employer and employees – don’t have time and / or money, and / or …    the list goes on and on.

What I want to know is: What are your thoughts on this subject?

QUESTIONS

  1. How important is home safety / take home safety in your company’s overall safety strategy? (Rate as Critical / Very Important / Important / Unimportant / Irrelevant)
  2. What percentage of your company’s safety budget is spent directly on home safety / taking safety home, which includes road safety in general (but not inside company premises)?
  3. What products or hand-outs is / has your company been giving all its employees in order to improve their home safety / take home safety?
  4. What ideas / suggestions / best practices do you have for improving home safety / take home safety?

Submit your answers here.

«  prev

next  »

 

SCnSP – Rework Your Safety Approach

♦♦  CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Feb 2018
     

Re‘-Work Your Safety Approach

Including your H&S Rep Training

Empowered Safety Rep

     

Let’s re-examine the real reason why safety is important.

We want our employees to return home to reunite with their families, every day. We want our assets and plants to remain in a safe and productive state. We want to re-use our resources and be relentless in reducing waste and effluent. Our operations need to be refined to reach the goal of reliably producing environment-friendly products.

Often, one of the causes of problems with safety is that we repeat old mistakes, over and over and over again. We need to recollect and learn from the past. One of the ways to do this is by conducting managerial reviews as part of our management system and standards.

The ‘RE‘ words

These are really important for safety because they’re action words and safety is not a once-off exercise.

RETURN  to the basics of safety.
REDISCOVER  the power of people – driven by a safety vision.
REQUEST  involvement and participation by all in safety.
REVIEW  your safety approach – reactive or proactive?
RECONSIDER  your safety recipe – approach.
RENEW  your safety systems and approach.
REFRESH  your approach – no papers, posters and pamphlets.
REINVENT  how you engage your people in safety.
REFLECT  on your attitude towards safety.
RECOGNISE  safe  behaviour and results.
REINFORCE  safe behaviour.
REWARD  Disruptive Safety[1] – better, faster, cheaper, safer.
RECHARGE  your safety efforts – our safety batteries are limited.
RETHINK  the repercussions of taking chances.
RECALL  incidents and remind employees of the consequences.
REVISE and REWRITE  your procedures to include safety.
RE-EXAMINE  what is preventing safety success.
REMOVE  causes of / reasons for unsafe behaviour.
RECTIFY  unsafe conditions promptly.
REPAIR  broken or damaged equipment or assets.
RESTORE  safety equipment and devices.
REPRIMAND  reckless behaviour.

Note

The word REACT is not in the above list because that is the most important behaviour / action to avoid in safety. A reactive approach focuses on compliance and corrective action only, rather than on prevention and doing the right things.
Also note that the words REVIEW, RECONSIDER, RENEW and REFRESH are all key to Disruptive Safety™ and that is why we have created The Safety Rep’s Survival Guide and are running in-house workshops.

Picture: Disruptive safety call to action icon

Ask yourself and your team:

Are you giving your internal customers (company employees) what they need or ordered, or are you merely flogging them stuff you think they should have or do, i.e. things they didn’t ask for, don’t understand or accept, can’t use and don’t value?

Don’t brush this off. This is a critical question if you want to get buy-in from the people you serve. It’s easy to assume that co-workers / employees don’t know what’s required in order to keep them safe. How do you know what it is that they do or don’t know if you haven’t asked them?

Listen and respect the input from those who ‘push the buttons and use the tools’. Accept their recommendations and legalise their actions = make them safe. This is where your H&S Reps play a critical role, provided they have been properly educated and empowered.

[1]   Disruptive Safety™ promotes a futuristic approach to safety which shifts the safety paradigm from ‘Preventing wrong’ to ‘Ensuring right’. Read more

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Nigel Risner, my international professional speaking colleague, who granted me permission to adapt the ‘RE’ concept for purposes of this safety tip.
[www.nigelrisner.com]

ESSENTIAL LINKS

Icon: Jurgen-Antzi with a mike

Let me help your staff reflect upon, recommit to and be responsible for championing your safety culture.

Search the S.H.E. ATM  –  for safety and wellness answers, tools and methods

Contact Jürgen

Copyright: Jürgen Tietz
Terms of Use

«  prev

next  »

 

SCnSP – Obsolete Safety – Part 2

♦♦  CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Nov 2017
     

Obsolete Safety (2)

the right people
+
the right questions
=
useful answers

communication

     

Ask better questions.
Ask the right people.
Don’t make assumptions.

These are some of the points I made in Obsolete Safety (part 1).
So here are some questions for you and your leaders.

QUESTIONS re SAFETY (the overall culture):

  • Who owns safety?
  • Who drew up the safety strategy / policy / budget and lifesaving rules ? Now: Ask the first question again.
  • What happens when your employees walk through the gate (both when coming to work and going home)?
  • How are you measuring safety, via the rear view mirror (looking at the past) or the windscreen (looking to the future)?
  • What keeps you awake at night, in terms of safety?

QUESTIONS re H&S REP’S specifically:

  • How happy are you with the contribution / engagement of your H&S Reps?
  • How proactive are your H&S Reps?
  • How happy are you with the people volunteering as H&S Reps?
  • Can your H&S Reps solve basic safety problems at the coalface?
  • How happy are you with the two-way communication in safety?

Picture: Disruptive safety call to action icon

It’s easy to dismiss this with a “Been there, done that.”
However, I urge you to do it again and this time, ask the right people.

Run a few fully facilitated focus groups. Mixed groups consisting of EXCO members, managers, supervisors and H&S Reps work best, but your existing culture will determine whether or not you can do that. Take care to not fall into the trap of ‘analysis paralysis’, though. Talking to even a small number of people will quickly give you the answers.

Give serious consideration to the Disruptive Safety approach [1] to transform your workplace safety.

[1]   Disruptive Safety™ promotes a futuristic approach to safety which shifts the safety paradigm from ‘Preventing wrong’ to ‘Ensuring right’.

ESSENTIAL LINKS

Icon: Jurgen-Antzi with a mike

Disruptive Safety™ and The Safety Rep’s Survival Guide  –  what it is and why you need it

Let me help your staff reflect upon, recommit to and be responsible for championing your safety culture.

Search the S.H.E. ATM  –  for safety and wellness answers, tools and methods

Contact Jürgen

Copyright: Jürgen Tietz
Terms of Use

«  prev

next  »

 

GM – Walking the Circle of Safety

♦♦♦  VEHICLE & CHILD SAFETY  ♦♦♦
May 2012
     

Walking the Circle of Safety

Picture depicting walking vehicular circle of safety

     

What is the Vehicular Circle of Safety?

Pretty much what it sounds like … circling your vehicle as a safety check before you drive off.

The ‘Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety’ website has a comprehensive checklist and a diagram of what to check for. Although it is directed at company vehicles, the Circle of Safety is definitely not limited to that – we all learnt about the circle check when we prepared for our driver licence tests. Ergo, this is something we should all be doing with our personal vehicles too!

Why do it?

Well, apart from the obvious, i.e. is the vehicle in a fit state to be on the road, doing this has the effect of increasing driver safety awareness. Some companies insist on the positioning of traffic cones around their vehicles so that drivers are ‘forced’ to ‘walk the circle’ as they remove the cones.

The example below is a VERY good reason for at least checking that there are no children or animals anywhere near your vehicle.

Source unknown, but thanks to Morkel for bringing it to my attention!

If you’re not already walking the Circle of Safety, why not start today? It’s the SMART thing to do.

RELATED READING

Childsafewebsite for the campaign of the Child Accident Prevention Foundation of Southern Africa (CAPFSA) and Safe Kids Worldwide

Driveway Run-over Injury Prevention Videosmade available by the New Zealand chapter of Safekids

Prediction on child road fatalities in Africa by 2015

ESSENTIAL LINKS

The Safety Guru  –  delivering your safety message powerfully, purposefully and permanently for real safety, health and wellness results

The S.H.E. ATM – search the ATM for information

Contact Jürgen – because I like to hear from you

Copyright: Jürgen Tietz
Terms of Use

«  prev

next  »

 

SCnSP – Safety Through Improvement

♦♦  CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Oct 2016
     

Safety Through Improvement

Lessons from flat tyres

Picture: 1950's on-the-road breakdown repairs

     

I have 2 vehicle-related anecdotes from which lessons can be learnt. The first is from my youth and the second a much more recent one.

I still remember vividly the long trips we used to take by car when I was a young boy, growing up in Namibia in the 1950’s.

In those days, there were no tarmac roads and motor vehicles weren’t very reliable. It was quite normal on such trips for the car to break down a few times. Two or three punctures and maybe even having to replace a tyre were quite common too. This meant that, before every trip, we had to prepare a set of spares, including spark plugs, fan belts and, of course, tyres, tubes and patches. We also packed a toolbox, tyre pump, wheel spanner, jack and a can of water (to fill up the radiator) into the car. Invariably, dealing with breakdowns meant cuts, bruises and other injuries, so the First Aid kit we carried in the car was also restocked on a regular basis.

The lesson to be learnt from this story is that plant and process reliability improve safety. Every time we have to carry out maintenance work or an operational intervention, especially modifications, changes and non-routine work, the risk of injury and damage increases because we have to fit and fiddle to make things work. It is for that reason that we have to change things for the better through continuous improvement [1]. One way to do that is to look at how advances in technology can help us to design in safety.

Recently, as I was driving home, I noticed a slight vibration on the steering and that the car was pulling to the left. I didn’t worry about it too much and drove on. When I got home, I saw that one of the front tyres was almost flat. On closer inspection, I noticed that a nail had pierced the sidewall of the tyre, causing a slow puncture.

A tyre going flat from a nail puncture doesn’t happen overnight. In a slow puncture, the tyre loses pressure slowly over a number of days, which brings me to the lesson in this anecdote. Despite the best advances in technology and design, we still have to play our part in safety. I didn’t carry out the Circle of Safety [2], i.e. I didn’t walk around my car before starting the engine and driving off. If I had, I would definitely have noticed that the tyre was going flat and have avoided a potentially serious incident. Just imagine what could have happened if I had been taking a longer trip, at full speed, on the highway!

Picture: Disruptive safety call to action icon

  1. Get together with your maintenance and operations teams to examine maintenance and non-routine operations tasks that involve a high degree of risk, e.g. potentially fatal situations like working at heights, lifting loads, working in confined spaces, lockouts, etc. This is like a HIRA (Hazard Identification Risk Assessment), except that it has a specific focus on design and plant and process reliability.
  2. It is best to man these teams with the people who “push the buttons and use the tools”. I’m not suggesting that you exclude the engineers, just that you apply a hands-on approach, rather than sticking to the boardroom / paper exercise.
  3. Keep it simple to start with and don’t fall into the trap of analysis paralysis by trying to redesign the entire process or machine. Look for opportunities for projects which involve minimal resources and can be done fairly quickly, yet still result in an immediate and visible improvement in safety [3].

[1]    “Prevention rather than cure

[2]    “Walking the Circle of Safety

[3]    “Just Do Something Safe

        “Ukuhlanya: Safety Paradox & Disruptive Safety

FEEDBACK

Your comments and feedback are always welcome!

Contact Jürgen

LOOKING FOR SOMETHING?

Try searching for it or use the search topics feature

Search the S.H.E. ATM
Copyright: Jürgen Tietz
Terms of Use

«  prev

next  »

 

SCnSP – Have You Been Tagged – State of Pedestrian Safety

♦♦♦    SAFETY CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE    ♦♦♦

In this series, I share with you my thoughts on Why Safety Is An Issue For Most Companies. One of the Things We Must Address If We Want To Improve Our Safety Performance is to review the state of pedestrian safety inside our company premises as well as surrounding communities and take action to reduce pedestrian fatalities.

picture of the Decade of Action for Road Safety tag

Have
You
Been
Tagged?

 

State of Pedestrian Safety

picture of the Decade of Action for Road Safety tag

NEWS FLASH    NEWS FLASH    NEWS FLASH    NEWS FLASH

24 June 2014
“A cyclist is fighting for his life after he was hit by a car on the R102 …”

22 June 2014
“A pedestrian is in a critical condition after he was knocked down on Hendrik Potgieter Rd …”

21 June 2014
“Man in a critical condition after he was knocked over by a construction vehicle.”

Enough? No?

31 May 2014
“A man was critically injured after he was hit by a car along Ballito Drive.”

27 May 2014
“54-year-old woman tragically lost her life after she was knocked over by a motor vehicle.”

26 Apr 2014
“A 29-year-old male pedestrian was killed at the M1 and M2 interchange in Booysens …”

Still not enough? Well, it is for me!

So, are you willing to be tagged?

The real tag I’m referring to will cost you effort, time and possibly even money … but it will be worth it, if you believe that life is priceless.

Watch this video, then read on.

snapshot of the video entitled The Long Short Walk

We’re almost halfway through the UN Decade of Action for Road Safety, which was officially launched 11 May 2011 via a resolution supported by 100 countries. This resolution was subsequently adopted by the UN General Assembly on 10 April this year.

The official aim of the Decade of Action is to stabilise and then reduce global road traffic fatalities by 2020. Making it real, the aim is to save 5 million lives.

Globally, road traffic incidents rank 8th as a cause of death.

But, they are the leading cause of death for people between the ages of 15 and 29.

Horrific stats.  That’s our younger generation.

Delving deeper, globally, pedestrian deaths amount to 22% of all road deaths every year – that’s over 270,000 people. Pedestrian fatalities in the African Region are sitting at 38%.

In South Africa, between 35-37% of all road fatalities are pedestrian fatalities.

If no effective action has been taken since 2011, then the forecast figures indicate that this year the figure of 270,000 will have increased to 330,000 by now.

South Africa launched the Arrive Alive Road Safety Campaign in 1997.
The RTMC is running a 365 Days Road Safety Campaign and published their revised Strategic Plan for the next 5 years in March.

Are these initiatives working?

At the 82nd UN Assembly (2013), Jeremiah Mamabolo said that the Arrive Alive Road Safety Campaign “had resulted in a drastic reduction in the number of deaths from accidents and sharpened the response of law enforcement agencies and health services.”

You can read all about the RTMC’s progress related to the “5 Pillars for the Decade of Action for Road Safety” in their latest annual report, and decide for yourself.

Like it or not, the fact remains that it is up to each and every individual to take responsibility for road safety.
Why not start with pedestrian safety?

♦ As individuals, we can ensure that we have not “gardened” up the paving areas outside our homes to the point where pedestrians are forced to walk in the street.

♦ As responsible citizens, we can ensure our communal areas and company premises are safe for pedestrians.

ACTION

  • Do a survey of pedestrian safety inside your company premises, including inside buildings. Are there enough walkways, clearly demarcated / barricaded off, for people to walk safely?
  • Look for places where people are NOT using the walk ways and establish why short cuts are being taken. Ask people, don’t make assumptions. Is it a matter of education / policing / discipline?
  • Go to your surrounding communities and look for opportunities to help with pedestrian safety, especially around schools. Can your company sponsor Zebra crossings, side walks, or anything else which can show your community that you do care.
  • Draw up a home safety flyer / cartoon brochure for your employees to take home and to distribute at schools to highlight the risks and safe behaviour. Or get posters that Arrive Alive and the RTMC have designed.
  • Share “The Long Short Walk” video with others and “tag” your people.

REFERENCE MATERIAL

Global Plan for Decade of Action for Road Safety & its 5 Pillars:
   Road Safety Fund material
   WHO material

Decade of Action for Road Safety tags

Pedestrian Safety WHO Manual (publ 2013)

National plan of action for South Africa:
   2011 strategy document
   2014 revised strategy plan

Global Status Report on Road Safety 2013

Reports for South Africa:
   Stats for South Africa that were used for Global Status Report
   Stats from Arrive Alive South Africa
   RTMC Annual Report 2012-2013

News excerpts

Graphics courtesy of  Decade for Action tags  &  Make Roads Safe

KEY DATES TO DIARISE

16 November 2014 (annually, 3rd Sunday of November):  World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims

4-10 May 2015:  Third UN Global Road Safety Week

2015 (details TBA):  Second Global Ministerial Conference on Road Safety (to be held in Brazil)

ADDITIONAL LINKS

Campaign brochure:  Safe Roads for All

Pedestrian Safety Advice:  from Arrive Alive South Africa online

Zenani Mandela Campaign

FEEDBACK

Your feedback and comments are always welcome! Drop me a line!

Copyright: Jürgen Tietz
Terms of Use

«  prev

next  »

 

D1STEM – Your Safety Monument

♦ SERIES ♦    DO ONE SAFETY THING EACH MONTH    ♦ SERIES ♦

If you do just one thing a month to change the safety mind-set, in one year you will have done 12 things to raise safety awareness. Every month you will receive one such SAFETY TIP.

THIS MONTH:    YOUR SAFETY MONUMENT

Safety is an ongoing journey, along stepping stones, towards your goal. A safety monument is a practical and visual way to get the message across that every person’s involvement is important and required in order to achieve that goal.

It can be a wall, or a path, as long as the stones remain visible.

Stepping stones to safety

I favour a “pathway of stepping stones”, taking you towards your goal. And whether a path or a wall or some other monument is used, what is KEY is the concept of involving all employees by getting them to bring one stone from home to add their bit to SAFETY at their place of work. They can even write their names on their stone.

To make it a living monument, this could become part of the new employee safety induction, where each new employee brings a stone to add to the path or wall.

This could be taken even further by involving the Safety Reps in shaping and owning this process and keeping it alive – give them Einspruchsrecht[1].

[1]   Einspruchsrecht = inspraaksreg = the right to partake in a decision.

GREEN CARD

Isibopho whistle and green card - safety - recognition

… goes out to Francois Du Toit of Sasol Polymers for the idea of building a safety monument out of stones.
… and also to Trevor Naicker and Gert Kriel who built on the idea and came up with the concept of making it a wall or a pathway, so that the stones remain visible and a person can point to “his” / “her” stone.

ON OFFER

Get loads more SAFETY TIPS when you buy my KNOCK-OUT SAFETY TIPS! CD from my DIY SAFETY COOL TOOL™ range of products. More info available here.

Ask me about the ISIBOPHO Whistle and Red-Green Cards.

FEEDBACK

As always, I welcome your comments and feedback!

Copyright: Jürgen Tietz
Terms of Use

«  prev

next  »

 

VUKA! VUSA!™ Safety Boot Camp

 

Jurgen Tietz: Anda Manufacturing CC TA eKhuluma logoimpleX Legal Compliance Solutions logo

VUKA! VUSA! Wake Up! Rise up! Boot Camp by eKhuluma and impleX

The SHE Rep plays a pivotal role in any OHS Management System:

  • On the one hand, the SHE Rep represents the employee – for the employees, by the employees.
  • On the other hand, the SHE Rep is a member of the committee tasked with making representations to the Employer on OHS issues.
Approach, Objectives and Outcomes

By involving the SHE Reps in the management of incidents (prevention, preparation, response and recovery), the employer will reap double the benefits. Not only will the SHE Reps be familiar with and understand the preventative measures relating to hazards and risks in the workplace (incidentally a legal requirement), but they will also be able to understand corrective action measures, and thus be able to explain these to the employees.

By equipping SHE Reps with the knowledge and understanding of the legislative requirements for reporting of incidents, accidents and other health threatening occurrences and near misses, you can ensure compliance with the legislative requirements, which is in the best interest of employees, whilst ensuring a workplace that is safe and without risk to health.

Course Outline

To ensure that we capture the SHE Rep audience and hold their attention, this unique BOOT CAMP comprises of

  • 1-2 hours discussion on the legislative requirements, in easy and understandable terms, using information provided by a legal expert from impleX.
  • Each delegate then receives a COOL TOOL™ pack.
  • 2-3 hours of application of the legislative measures to everyday objects through fun activities and association.

The double impact will ensure that the SHE Reps leave the boot camp understanding and, more importantly, remembering the requirements. They will be eager to relate this knowledge, on a sustainable basis, to their areas of responsibility.

PART 1: DISCUSSION – LEGISLATIVE REQUIREMENTS

  • An introduction to the applicable Health and Safety legislation
  • How to interpret the law – for non-lawyers
  • Duties of the employer
  • Duties of the employee
  • Duties of the Health and Safety representative – in terms of the law
  • Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment – Assessing and responding to risk
  • Training, Information, Instruction and Supervision
  • Investigation and reporting of accidents, incidents and diseases
  • Your company-specific procedure for incident management
  • The cost of non-compliance – liability, penalties and action by the inspectorate

PART 2: APPLICATION ACTIVITIES – LEGISLATIVE MEASURES

Jurgen Tietz - Vuka Vusa toolbox - closed view

The novel, unique and flexible COOL TOOL™ TOOLBOX items are specifically aimed at raising the awareness and need for action in OHS related matters. Using a hands-on approach gets the people at the rock face / shop floor to “eKhuluma” (talk) about and take action on safety related matters.

This approach makes the OHS messages ‘stick’. The power of the COOL TOOL™ items lies in their simplicity and in associating everyday items with OHS. With minimal guidance and training, your H&S Reps will be able to engage people across cultures and levels to “walk their talk”.

Jurgen Tietz - Vuka Vusa boot camp toolbox showing contents
Number of Attendees & Sessions

Minimum 30 attendees per session, but up to 60 can be accommodated.

Duration & Timing

Up to 5 hours training, excluding lunch and tea breaks.

The quote is based on training sessions done Monday to Friday, during day-shift hours.

If training sessions are required over the weekend or after hours, a 50% surcharge per delegate will be imposed.

Venue & Preparation

The Client is responsible for arranging a suitable venue that meets our requirements for workshop facilitation and interaction with the delegates.

The Client will deal with the logistics and provision of refreshments.

The contact details of the delegates need to be provided by the Client before each session, so that we can send the delegates the pre-work required in preparation for the workshop, as well as invite them to share with us any questions and/or issues they may have.

Equipment / Presentation Aids Requirements

Please confirm that you have a screen projector and flip chart / white board available in the training facility.

Certificates & Feedback

An Attendance Certificate will be given to each workshop attendee and a summary of the feedback and evaluation comments will be given to the client.

Customization for In-House Boot Camps: MIRROR TECHNIQUE

This critical technique involves taking photos of your specific site and giving feedback to the audience about the GOOD, the bad and the ugly. I focus on personal workspaces, where you sit, eat, work and keep your tools, as I believe that safety starts ‘at home’. In the feedback I use the Safety Game analogy, with the ‘players’ and ‘coach’, as well as the “ISIBOPHO” whistle and red / green card. The delegates have to ‘look to see’ and accept responsibility for the need to change. This technique involves photos of your operation, which the delegates can recognize and identify with. Below are a few examples of photos which I share with the people ‘who push the buttons and use the tools’.

Mirror Technique photo exampleMirror Technique photo example

Mirror Technique photo exampleMirror Technique photo example

Mirror Technique photo exampleMirror Technique photo example

The customisation is included in the Boot Camp fee. We estimate that it will take half a day to walk about, take suitable photographs and prepare the mirror sessions for the delegates. The client has to provide a safety person to act as a guide for these walkabouts.

A brochure containing this information can be downloaded here.

Jurgen Tietz brings you Safety: by the people, for the people
Need a keyword?

H&S Rep Workshop

H&S Rep Training
The
Not Just Any
H&S Rep Workshop
that’s for everyone.

Read about it here

Share this page

Find me on

Connect with Jurgen Tietz via FacebookConnect with Jurgen Tietz via LinkedIn

Join the revolution

Disruptive Safety
The Safety Reps Survival Guide handbook