Search Results for: Prevention

D1STEM – Prevention rather than cure

♦ SERIES ♦    DO ONE SAFETY THING EACH MONTH    ♦ SERIES ♦

I like to “Keep it simple” and this is often part of my advice. For this month’s activity, I strongly recommend you do keep it simple or else you may find yourself caught in analysis paralysis.

Prevention
Rather Than Cure

Think. Accidents are avoidable.

Analyse your safety efforts – how much of it is policing, rather than pro-active prevention and improvement?

A good safety approach constitutes a balance between systems and procedures, safety equipment and people’s actions and behaviour. Compliance and corrective action are less effective than prevention and pro-active action.

Improve the design and operation of safety efforts to reduce the remaining risk, before an incident forces you to do it.

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SoSSB 10P 01 Prevention

♦ SERIES ♦♦   SAFETY ON A SHOESTRING BUDGET   ♦♦ SERIES ♦

PREVENTION

Safety Tip #1 in the series

  ♦  PREVENTION   ◊  PURPOSE
  ◊  PREPARATION   ◊  PEOPLE
  ◊  PROBLEMS   ◊  PAT-ON-BACK
  ◊  PLAN   ◊  PROGRESS
  ◊  PEN-TO-PAPER   ◊  PRO-ACTIVE

The purpose of this series is to give struggling-but-eager SHE professionals and practitioners, who are working for financially-constrained companies, pointers on how to get the safety awareness message across to both management and workers, on a shoestring budget.

Today’s topic, PREVENTION, highlights the importance of cultivating the right ATTITUDE towards safety in order to change BEHAVIOUR.

PREVENTION IS BETTER THAN CURE
i.e. it’s easier (and cheaper) to prevent incidents than to fix the consequences

The MIRROR TECHNIQUE is a powerful tool for building this mindset in a non-intimidating way, when used in a manner that encourages openness and disclosure, rather than policing and punishment.

It is a technique that relies on POP – the Power of Photos!

Digital photography is an easy, instant and cheap way of making people SEE and take ACTION.

I use the mirror technique by taking photos:

  • of the GOOD, the bad and the ugly – a balanced mix;
  • starting with personal work spaces, like offices, workshops, cupboards, toolboxes, hand tools, canteens, chairs, bottles, etc;
  • of no-man’s-land, like stores, waste and effluent collection areas, etc.
Take photos of the good, the bad, the ugly

Using a camera is not new. The trick lies in how the photos are used. Merely posting them on a notice board or publishing them in a newsletter has little effect and is a waste of time. SOMEONE has to accept responsibility for the photo – i.e. take ownership for ensuring the required change / improvement is made.

This is best done in an open feedback session, but make sure it is balanced with the GOOD and that there is no SHAMING and BLAMING taking place.
This will move people into ACTION, like Theuns in the story of “Theuns' and Mandla's Contract”.

If you would like a (free) copy of the story “Theuns’ & Mandla’s Contract”,
you can request it here.
Want to comment on this SIMPLY SMART SAFETY™ Tip or share your insights with me?
You are more than welcome to do so here.
© Copyright:Jürgen Tietz

SpEd_CA H&S Rep Seminar – Apr 2018

♦♦  SAVE THE DATE!  ♦♦
17-18 April 2018

Save the date

The Disruptive Safety Antzi’s are at it again, bringing you the

Not Just Any H&S Rep Training

Who’s it for?

Everyone who wants to own their workplace safety.

What makes it different?

Exactly that. If you’ve had enough of relying only on legislation, rules, regulations and procedures, if you’re ready to step up to the plate and make your workplace safety an everyday reality, practical and effective – then we’re the ones to show you how to make it happen.

When?

17-18 April 2018

Where?

Birchwood Conference Venue and Hotel

Want to know more?

Visit our website

Ready to register?

Complete the registration form and send it to us.

Jürgen and Natalie

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Disruptive Safety™ and The Safety Rep’s Survival Guide  –  what it is and why you need it

Let me help your staff reflect upon, recommit to and be responsible for championing your safety culture.

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SCnSP – Rework Your Safety Approach

♦♦  CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Feb 2018
     

Re‘-Work Your Safety Approach

Including your H&S Rep Training

Empowered Safety Rep

     

Let’s re-examine the real reason why safety is important.

We want our employees to return home to reunite with their families, every day. We want our assets and plants to remain in a safe and productive state. We want to re-use our resources and be relentless in reducing waste and effluent. Our operations need to be refined to reach the goal of reliably producing environment-friendly products.

Often, one of the causes of problems with safety is that we repeat old mistakes, over and over and over again. We need to recollect and learn from the past. One of the ways to do this is by conducting managerial reviews as part of our management system and standards.

The ‘RE‘ words

These are really important for safety because they’re action words and safety is not a once-off exercise.

RETURN  to the basics of safety.
REDISCOVER  the power of people – driven by a safety vision.
REQUEST  involvement and participation by all in safety.
REVIEW  your safety approach – reactive or proactive?
RECONSIDER  your safety recipe – approach.
RENEW  your safety systems and approach.
REFRESH  your approach – no papers, posters and pamphlets.
REINVENT  how you engage your people in safety.
REFLECT  on your attitude towards safety.
RECOGNISE  safe  behaviour and results.
REINFORCE  safe behaviour.
REWARD  Disruptive Safety[1] – better, faster, cheaper, safer.
RECHARGE  your safety efforts – our safety batteries are limited.
RETHINK  the repercussions of taking chances.
RECALL  incidents and remind employees of the consequences.
REVISE and REWRITE  your procedures to include safety.
RE-EXAMINE  what is preventing safety success.
REMOVE  causes of / reasons for unsafe behaviour.
RECTIFY  unsafe conditions promptly.
REPAIR  broken or damaged equipment or assets.
RESTORE  safety equipment and devices.
REPRIMAND  reckless behaviour.

Note

The word REACT is not in the above list because that is the most important behaviour / action to avoid in safety. A reactive approach focuses on compliance and corrective action only, rather than on prevention and doing the right things.
Also note that the words REVIEW, RECONSIDER, RENEW and REFRESH are all key to Disruptive Safety™ and that is why we have created The Safety Rep’s Survival Guide and are running in-house workshops.

Picture: Disruptive safety call to action icon

Ask yourself and your team:

Are you giving your internal customers (company employees) what they need or ordered, or are you merely flogging them stuff you think they should have or do, i.e. things they didn’t ask for, don’t understand or accept, can’t use and don’t value?

Don’t brush this off. This is a critical question if you want to get buy-in from the people you serve. It’s easy to assume that co-workers / employees don’t know what’s required in order to keep them safe. How do you know what it is that they do or don’t know if you haven’t asked them?

Listen and respect the input from those who ‘push the buttons and use the tools’. Accept their recommendations and legalise their actions = make them safe. This is where your H&S Reps play a critical role, provided they have been properly educated and empowered.

[1]   Disruptive Safety™ promotes a futuristic approach to safety which shifts the safety paradigm from ‘Preventing wrong’ to ‘Ensuring right’. Read more

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Nigel Risner, my international professional speaking colleague, who granted me permission to adapt the ‘RE’ concept for purposes of this safety tip.
[www.nigelrisner.com]

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SpEd_CA – H&S Rep Workshop Mar 2018

♦♦  SAVE THE DATE!  ♦♦

Save the date

The Disruptive Safety Antzi’s are at it again and this time they’re bringing you the

Not Just Any H&S Rep Training

Who’s it for?

Everyone who wants to own their workplace safety.

What makes it different?

Exactly that. If you’ve had enough of relying only on legislation, rules, regulations and procedures, if you’re ready to step up to the plate and make your workplace safety an everyday reality, practical and effective – then we’re the ones to show you how to make it happen.

When?

6-7 March 2018

Where?

Birchwood Conference Venue and Hotel

Want to know more?

Get the information leaflet (which includes the registration form).

Ready to register?

Complete the registration form and send it to us.

ps. There’s an early bird discount, so don’t waste any time!

Jürgen and Natalie

ESSENTIAL LINKS

Icon: Jurgen-Antzi with a mike

Disruptive Safety™ and The Safety Rep’s Survival Guide  –  what it is and why you need it

Let me help your staff reflect upon, recommit to and be responsible for championing your safety culture.

Search the S.H.E. ATM  –  for safety and wellness answers, tools and methods

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SCnSP – Obsolete Safety – Part 1

♦♦  CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Mar 2017
     

Obsolete Safety

(Part 1)

obsolete printer

     

It was with great sadness that I had to pull the plug on my HP990 CXI. It was this printer that enabled me to self-publish over 550 copies of my first book (some 210 000 pages). Over its 17-year lifespan, it processed close to 2 tons of paper. I feel a real sense of loss, because, to use an old cliche, they just don’t make them like this anymore. On this trusty printer’s death certificate, the technician wrote: “Obsolete. No spare parts available anymore.”

Obsolete.

It’s one of those killer words. It originates from the Latin obsolescere meaning “to fall into disuse” – a very handy adjective for anything that is determined to no longer be of any use. It can be applied to words, factories, computer software, ways of thinking – anything that has, usually, been displaced by a newer, shinier innovation.

Let’s consider workplace safety, in the light of obsolescence.

As far as I’m concerned, if you’re still using Heinrich’s pyramid[1], or your safety systems are based on compliance, near misses, Zero Harm and Safety First, then your approach to safety in the workplace is obsolete. A harsh judgement? Perhaps, but it’s true. (Heinrich’s empirical findings date back to the 1930’s!)

So what’s the answer?

It’s not a new (computer) system, but rather, being willing to adopt a fresh approach, to look at things from a different angle / perspective. And not because it’s cool or the current trend, but because you recognise that what you have in place is obsolete.

Resistance to change

We like to stay in our comfort zone – the place where we know what to do and don’t have to work too hard to get it done. It’s tough to admit that what we’re doing might have been superseded by something better. My VW Beetle was a most wonderful vehicle. I hung onto it for years and years, even though it was outdated. Compared to today’s cars, it’s performance and reliability, fuel efficiency, emissions, driving comfort and safety were poor. Still, I loved the “Volksie” sound. It was hard to let it go.

Change is inevitable

One of the constants of our life, as we know it, is that everything that is being done today will be done better, faster, more cheaply and more safely, i.e. more efficiently, in the future. That’s because change is driven by a mindset of “we want it and we want it now”. This is true not only of photography, banking, transport, music, communication, food consumption, or any other field you care to think of. It’s true of Health and Safety too.

The way to go

Disruptive Safety™ is a solution-based model which totally transforms the way in which workplace safety is approached. It’s about moving The Elephant (safety culture) and getting everyone to really own safety. A key component of Disruptive Safety™ is the manner in which H&S Reps are engaged, viz. by shifting their attentions so that, instead of focusing only on prevention and compliance, they also apply a proactive approach of making sure things go right.

Picture: Disruptive safety call to action icon

Examine your safety approach.

Ask better questions. Ask the right people. Don’t make assumptions or be complacent. Are you doing the same things over and over but expecting better results?

Now answer the question: Is your safety approach obsolete?
If yes, then you’re ready for Disruptive Safety™. Contact us if you want to know more about it.

[1]   Herbert William Heinrich’s 300-29-1 ratio, also known as Heinrich’s triangle, pertaining to his premise re the foundation of a major injury.

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GM – Walking the Circle of Safety

♦♦♦  VEHICLE & CHILD SAFETY  ♦♦♦
May 2012
     

Walking the Circle of Safety

Picture depicting walking vehicular circle of safety

     

What is the Vehicular Circle of Safety?

Pretty much what it sounds like … circling your vehicle as a safety check before you drive off.

The ‘Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety’ website has a comprehensive checklist and a diagram of what to check for. Although it is directed at company vehicles, the Circle of Safety is definitely not limited to that – we all learnt about the circle check when we prepared for our driver licence tests. Ergo, this is something we should all be doing with our personal vehicles too!

Why do it?

Well, apart from the obvious, i.e. is the vehicle in a fit state to be on the road, doing this has the effect of increasing driver safety awareness. Some companies insist on the positioning of traffic cones around their vehicles so that drivers are ‘forced’ to ‘walk the circle’ as they remove the cones.

The example below is a VERY good reason for at least checking that there are no children or animals anywhere near your vehicle.

Source unknown, but thanks to Morkel for bringing it to my attention!

If you’re not already walking the Circle of Safety, why not start today? It’s the SMART thing to do.

RELATED READING

Childsafewebsite for the campaign of the Child Accident Prevention Foundation of Southern Africa (CAPFSA) and Safe Kids Worldwide

Driveway Run-over Injury Prevention Videosmade available by the New Zealand chapter of Safekids

Prediction on child road fatalities in Africa by 2015

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GM – World AIDS Day 2016

AIDS ribbon bullet pointAIDS ribbon bullet pointAIDS ribbon bullet point      WORLD AIDS DAY   AIDS ribbon bullet point   1 December 2016      AIDS ribbon bullet pointAIDS ribbon bullet pointAIDS ribbon bullet point
Oct 2016

Hands up for #HIVprevention

Picture: Hands up for #HIVprevention

It’s World AIDS Day in just over a month’s time. I think the UN’s hashtag for this year’s theme should’ve been #HIVPreventionEveryDay, but I am grateful that, at the least, we all have the opportunity to emphasise the need for #HIVprevention on this one particular day, every year.

Why?

According to the UN’s “AIDS By The Numbers” report for 2016, 1.1 million people worldwide died of AIDS-related illnesses in 2015. It was also estimated that, by the end of 2015, there would be 36.7 million people in the world living with HIV. [1]

The stats for South Africa are dismal. Year on year, since 2010, the number of people contracting HIV has been going UP, with an estimated 19.2% of the population being infected as at 2015. [2]

Most of you who read my safety tips regularly will know that I believe in tackling issues over which we have control. HIV/AIDS is one of those issues. We can all contribute to the UN members’ goals of ending AIDS by 2030.

Number 3 on the list of the UN’s “Fast Track Commitments to end AIDS by 2030” [3] is:

“Ensure access to combination prevention options, including pre-exposure prophylaxis, voluntary medical male circumcision, harm reduction and condoms, to at least 90% of people …”

Number 5 is:

“Ensure that 90% of young people have the skills, knowledge and capacity to protect themselves from HIV …”

UNAIDS, the UN agency responsible for the global HIV/AIDS response, has published their World AIDS Day campaign brochure for the 2016 theme: “Hands up for #HIVprevention“. It’s an exciting, interactive initiative and the brochure expands on what you can do to raise awareness using their “Hands Up” theme. [4]

I am raising my hand for PREVENTION and AWARENESS and you can too.

[1]    “AIDS By The Numbers” 2016, UN Epidemiology publication

[2]    From additional data made available at aidsinfo.unaids.org

[3]    “10 Fast Track Commitments to End AIDS by 2030“, UNAIDS publication

[4]    “UNAID’s World AIDS Day 2016 Campaign Brochure

ON OFFER

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Be a Smart Cookie.
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Get the No Condom No CookieGoodie Box for your employees.
Don’t stop there.
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picture of No Condom No Cookie AIDS Goodie Box contents

This Do-It-Yourself AIDS Education Kit contains AIDS Awareness cookies, posters, keyrings with condom compartments, info-lets and facilitation guide.
PLUS … there are various content options available and quantity discounts too!

  More info   In action   Feedback  

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SCnSP – Safety Through Improvement

♦♦  CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Oct 2016
     

Safety Through Improvement

Lessons from flat tyres

Picture: 1950's on-the-road breakdown repairs

     

I have 2 vehicle-related anecdotes from which lessons can be learnt. The first is from my youth and the second a much more recent one.

I still remember vividly the long trips we used to take by car when I was a young boy, growing up in Namibia in the 1950’s.

In those days, there were no tarmac roads and motor vehicles weren’t very reliable. It was quite normal on such trips for the car to break down a few times. Two or three punctures and maybe even having to replace a tyre were quite common too. This meant that, before every trip, we had to prepare a set of spares, including spark plugs, fan belts and, of course, tyres, tubes and patches. We also packed a toolbox, tyre pump, wheel spanner, jack and a can of water (to fill up the radiator) into the car. Invariably, dealing with breakdowns meant cuts, bruises and other injuries, so the First Aid kit we carried in the car was also restocked on a regular basis.

The lesson to be learnt from this story is that plant and process reliability improve safety. Every time we have to carry out maintenance work or an operational intervention, especially modifications, changes and non-routine work, the risk of injury and damage increases because we have to fit and fiddle to make things work. It is for that reason that we have to change things for the better through continuous improvement [1]. One way to do that is to look at how advances in technology can help us to design in safety.

Recently, as I was driving home, I noticed a slight vibration on the steering and that the car was pulling to the left. I didn’t worry about it too much and drove on. When I got home, I saw that one of the front tyres was almost flat. On closer inspection, I noticed that a nail had pierced the sidewall of the tyre, causing a slow puncture.

A tyre going flat from a nail puncture doesn’t happen overnight. In a slow puncture, the tyre loses pressure slowly over a number of days, which brings me to the lesson in this anecdote. Despite the best advances in technology and design, we still have to play our part in safety. I didn’t carry out the Circle of Safety [2], i.e. I didn’t walk around my car before starting the engine and driving off. If I had, I would definitely have noticed that the tyre was going flat and have avoided a potentially serious incident. Just imagine what could have happened if I had been taking a longer trip, at full speed, on the highway!

Picture: Disruptive safety call to action icon

  1. Get together with your maintenance and operations teams to examine maintenance and non-routine operations tasks that involve a high degree of risk, e.g. potentially fatal situations like working at heights, lifting loads, working in confined spaces, lockouts, etc. This is like a HIRA (Hazard Identification Risk Assessment), except that it has a specific focus on design and plant and process reliability.
  2. It is best to man these teams with the people who “push the buttons and use the tools”. I’m not suggesting that you exclude the engineers, just that you apply a hands-on approach, rather than sticking to the boardroom / paper exercise.
  3. Keep it simple to start with and don’t fall into the trap of analysis paralysis by trying to redesign the entire process or machine. Look for opportunities for projects which involve minimal resources and can be done fairly quickly, yet still result in an immediate and visible improvement in safety [3].

[1]    “Prevention rather than cure

[2]    “Walking the Circle of Safety

[3]    “Just Do Something Safe

        “Ukuhlanya: Safety Paradox & Disruptive Safety

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GM – Water and Women in Rail n Safety Conference

\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\      CURRENT AFFAIRS      ///////////////
Sep 2016

Today, I have 2 matters which I wish to speak about, so I will keep each one short, but that is by no means an indication of the importance that I attach to both.

     

1.  Running Water

Picture: water

     

Recently, we spent a week at a private game lodge, in the tented camp, right in the middle of the bushveld. It was a most enriching experience for us to be able to get back to nature. The peace and quiet of the bush really makes one appreciate the environment. At this time of the year, especially during current times of drought, the veld is dry and the ground hungry for water, but the rains are still far away.

We had access to water in a can and hand basin, as well as a shower, although it provided only a low-pressure trickle of water. We were pleasantly surprised at how much less water one uses under these circumstances. This experience gave me a new appreciation for how precious water really is in this country. Many of us who have running water take it for granted and forget how easy it is to abuse water usage as a result!

ACTION

Look at where you are using running water.
Apart from doing the basics required by law, what can you do NOW to save water?  These are things we should be doing all the time for the future sustainability of our planet, not only when there is a drought or low-rain situation.

If you’re stuck for ideas, check out this list of more than 100 ways to save water.  There are bound to be at least a few suggestions there that you haven’t thought of / implemented yet!

     

2.  Conference: Women in Rail and Safety

     

I highly recommend this ‘golden’ (or should I say ‘purple’?) opportunity for all women who receive my safety tips, as well as all of you who employ women in a safety role!

The speaker lineup and content has me thinking about sneaking into the venue and taking up a low profile, back row seat.

Picture: Women in Rail and Safety Conference 2016: covering workplace human factors of (1) shift work and its effects on women, (2) obesity, (3) lifestyle diseases, (4) functional capacity, (5) overall health and wellness, (6) cracked glass ceiling, (7) professionalism and ethics, (8) surviving in a male-dominated environment, (9) dealing with workplace harassment as a safety issue, (10) health and safety in the workplace.

For details and registration, you can look at the article on SHEQAfrica. Contact names and details are provided there.

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