Search Results for: Progress

SoSSB 10P 08 Progress

♦ SERIES ♦♦   SAFETY ON A SHOESTRING BUDGET   ♦♦ SERIES ♦

PROGRESS

Safety Tip #8 in the series

  ◊  PREVENTION   ◊  PURPOSE
  ◊  PREPARATION   ◊  PEOPLE
  ◊  PROBLEMS   ◊  PAT-ON-BACK
  ◊  PLAN   ♦  PROGRESS
  ◊  PEN-TO-PAPER   ◊  PRO-ACTIVE

The purpose of this series is to give struggling-but-eager SHE professionals and practitioners, who are working for financially-constrained companies, pointers on how to get the safety awareness message across to both management and workers, on a shoestring budget.

Because of the reality of CHANGE, we are faced with the necessity for ACTION  –  
action that requires PROGRESS to be made.

CHANGE
is certain

We have come a long way since the 1930’s, when the Empire State building was constructed and over 150 people were killed in the process.

Everything that is being done now, is going to be done differently in the future.

And that’s PROGRESS.

ACTION
is what counts

Most improvements are re-active:

There is an accident, especially one involving people and serious injury, or someone is killed.

NOW we install the guard, barrier, interlock, stop sign.

IT’S TOO LATE!
Corrective action is too late – definitely for the injured person.

We must be pro-active and identify the hazards and take action to prevent it happening in the first place!

PROGRESS
A PLAN without making any progress, is a waste of paper and time,
practically as bad as no PLAN at all!
Ask the people at the site for their Safety Improvements Plan and look for PROGRESS, i.e. items that have been completed and pro-active items.
look for progress
Doing a HIRA (Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment) is one way of identifying areas for improvement, and, when done on a regular basis, a good tool for measuring progress.
If you would like a copy of the story “CHANGE JUST IN TIME”,
you can request it here.
Want to comment on this SAFETY TIPS or share your insights with me?
You are more than welcome to do so here.
© Copyright: Jurgen Tietz

Change -> Action -> Progress

 

Because of the reality of CHANGE,

we are faced with the necessity for ACTION

action that requires PROGRESS to be made.

That’s the subject of my latest Safety Tips for “Safety on a Shoestring Budget” (posted here).

Jürgen

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SCnSP – When is the safety battle won?

♦♦  CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Jul 2017
     

When Is The Safety Battle Won?

Engaging hearts and minds

Heart = OwnershipMind = Commitment

     

Many centuries ago, a Roman general was leading his legions towards the enemy in a swampy country. He knew that the next day’s battle would be fought on a certain plain because it was the only dry, flat place for miles. He pushed his army all night, marching them through a frightening and formidable swamp, so that they reached the battle site before the enemy and could claim the high ground.

In the aftermath of victory, the general called his troops together and asked them, “Brothers, when did we win the battle?”
One captain replied, “Sir, when the infantry attacked.”
Another said, “Sir, we won when the cavalry broke through.”
“No,” said the general. “We won the battle the night before – when our men marched through that swamp and took the high ground.” [1]

So, when is the SAFETY battle won?

Not when the rubber hits the road, or the airplane is at cruising height, or the construction is in progress, or the plant is operating on full steam. Not by analysing the statistics, reporting ‘near misses’ and investigating incidents. Not by paperwork and audits. Not by being reactive.

No … because by then it’s too late. All you can do then is police for compliance. I mean, can you imagine if the general in the above story had used that approach – having to check (audit) that his troops are actually fighting and using the correct combat tactics, rather than leading them in battle?

No. The safety battle is won long before any of the items mentioned above. It is won when we manage to get safety into the hearts and minds of all our people. It is won when we have succeeded in getting people to make safety a habit, in everything they do. Before they tackle each task, while they’re carrying out the task and after they’ve completed the task. It is won when the safety ABC is in place – individual safety Attitude, Behaviour, Choice. It is won when our people are no longer complying out of fear of being caught and disciplined or because the boss is watching. The safety battle is won when our people are thinking ‘Safety Assurance’ as part of the preparation for everything they do. It is won when individual perceptions of risk include thinking about consequences.

Finally, the safety battle is won when we all are looking at continuous improvement and best practices and sharing how to work smarter and safer. It is won when our people are not afraid of failing and treat every ‘near hit’ as an opportunity to improve productivity and safety.

Picture: Disruptive safety call to action icon

As safety professionals, we should strive to support the business by improving productivity safely!
We should be the first port of call when people are thinking of taking a shortcut or reporting a ‘near hit’ or ‘failure’. And it should be because they know and trust that we will help them do it safely, instead of blaming, and crucifying them for pushing the boundaries.
Safety Always.

[1]   Pressfield, Steven. The Warrior Ethos. Black Irish Entertainment LLC (2011). 978-1936891009.

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SCnSP – Have You Been Tagged – State of Pedestrian Safety

♦♦♦    SAFETY CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE    ♦♦♦

In this series, I share with you my thoughts on Why Safety Is An Issue For Most Companies. One of the Things We Must Address If We Want To Improve Our Safety Performance is to review the state of pedestrian safety inside our company premises as well as surrounding communities and take action to reduce pedestrian fatalities.

picture of the Decade of Action for Road Safety tag

Have
You
Been
Tagged?

 

State of Pedestrian Safety

picture of the Decade of Action for Road Safety tag

NEWS FLASH    NEWS FLASH    NEWS FLASH    NEWS FLASH

24 June 2014
“A cyclist is fighting for his life after he was hit by a car on the R102 …”

22 June 2014
“A pedestrian is in a critical condition after he was knocked down on Hendrik Potgieter Rd …”

21 June 2014
“Man in a critical condition after he was knocked over by a construction vehicle.”

Enough? No?

31 May 2014
“A man was critically injured after he was hit by a car along Ballito Drive.”

27 May 2014
“54-year-old woman tragically lost her life after she was knocked over by a motor vehicle.”

26 Apr 2014
“A 29-year-old male pedestrian was killed at the M1 and M2 interchange in Booysens …”

Still not enough? Well, it is for me!

So, are you willing to be tagged?

The real tag I’m referring to will cost you effort, time and possibly even money … but it will be worth it, if you believe that life is priceless.

Watch this video, then read on.

snapshot of the video entitled The Long Short Walk

We’re almost halfway through the UN Decade of Action for Road Safety, which was officially launched 11 May 2011 via a resolution supported by 100 countries. This resolution was subsequently adopted by the UN General Assembly on 10 April this year.

The official aim of the Decade of Action is to stabilise and then reduce global road traffic fatalities by 2020. Making it real, the aim is to save 5 million lives.

Globally, road traffic incidents rank 8th as a cause of death.

But, they are the leading cause of death for people between the ages of 15 and 29.

Horrific stats.  That’s our younger generation.

Delving deeper, globally, pedestrian deaths amount to 22% of all road deaths every year – that’s over 270,000 people. Pedestrian fatalities in the African Region are sitting at 38%.

In South Africa, between 35-37% of all road fatalities are pedestrian fatalities.

If no effective action has been taken since 2011, then the forecast figures indicate that this year the figure of 270,000 will have increased to 330,000 by now.

South Africa launched the Arrive Alive Road Safety Campaign in 1997.
The RTMC is running a 365 Days Road Safety Campaign and published their revised Strategic Plan for the next 5 years in March.

Are these initiatives working?

At the 82nd UN Assembly (2013), Jeremiah Mamabolo said that the Arrive Alive Road Safety Campaign “had resulted in a drastic reduction in the number of deaths from accidents and sharpened the response of law enforcement agencies and health services.”

You can read all about the RTMC’s progress related to the “5 Pillars for the Decade of Action for Road Safety” in their latest annual report, and decide for yourself.

Like it or not, the fact remains that it is up to each and every individual to take responsibility for road safety.
Why not start with pedestrian safety?

♦ As individuals, we can ensure that we have not “gardened” up the paving areas outside our homes to the point where pedestrians are forced to walk in the street.

♦ As responsible citizens, we can ensure our communal areas and company premises are safe for pedestrians.

ACTION

  • Do a survey of pedestrian safety inside your company premises, including inside buildings. Are there enough walkways, clearly demarcated / barricaded off, for people to walk safely?
  • Look for places where people are NOT using the walk ways and establish why short cuts are being taken. Ask people, don’t make assumptions. Is it a matter of education / policing / discipline?
  • Go to your surrounding communities and look for opportunities to help with pedestrian safety, especially around schools. Can your company sponsor Zebra crossings, side walks, or anything else which can show your community that you do care.
  • Draw up a home safety flyer / cartoon brochure for your employees to take home and to distribute at schools to highlight the risks and safe behaviour. Or get posters that Arrive Alive and the RTMC have designed.
  • Share “The Long Short Walk” video with others and “tag” your people.

REFERENCE MATERIAL

Global Plan for Decade of Action for Road Safety & its 5 Pillars:
   Road Safety Fund material
   WHO material

Decade of Action for Road Safety tags

Pedestrian Safety WHO Manual (publ 2013)

National plan of action for South Africa:
   2011 strategy document
   2014 revised strategy plan

Global Status Report on Road Safety 2013

Reports for South Africa:
   Stats for South Africa that were used for Global Status Report
   Stats from Arrive Alive South Africa
   RTMC Annual Report 2012-2013

News excerpts

Graphics courtesy of  Decade for Action tags  &  Make Roads Safe

KEY DATES TO DIARISE

16 November 2014 (annually, 3rd Sunday of November):  World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims

4-10 May 2015:  Third UN Global Road Safety Week

2015 (details TBA):  Second Global Ministerial Conference on Road Safety (to be held in Brazil)

ADDITIONAL LINKS

Campaign brochure:  Safe Roads for All

Pedestrian Safety Advice:  from Arrive Alive South Africa online

Zenani Mandela Campaign

FEEDBACK

Your feedback and comments are always welcome! Drop me a line!

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GM – Your Safety Nkandla

♦♦♦    Your Safety Nkandla    ♦♦♦

ANC (Always Neat Cover-up) LESSONS

 

I don’t want to go into the politics of Nkandla, as there are already so many (in)competent politicians and sideline spectators commenting on this fiasco. Thuli has done the detailed investigation and has put the cat amongst the pigeons.

There are, however, some basic lessons to be learned from the Nkandla debacle with respect to Safety Improvement Plans. What Nkandla is highlighting for us is the lack of 101 in Project Planning, or to put it differently, how not to run and manage your safety improvement efforts.

a view of Nkandla

A useful checklist to ensure you don’t end up with your own Nkandlagate:

  • Do you have a detailed Safety Improvement Plan in place and are you, in fact, using it?
  • Are the overall objectives of your plan crystal clear and have they been translated into requirements, together with constraints, dimensions and limitations? Do you really need a chicken run, cattle kraal or swimming pool to improve (your) safety?
  • Have you done the 4R‘s test of goal setting?
              ResearchedRealisticRelevantReassessed
  • Is the plan broken down in clear and detailed steps / milestones and sub-projects?
  • Have you done a  R-A-C-I  for your plan?
    • Are the Responsibilities clearly defined and accepted for each of these sub-projects?
    • Who ultimately owns / is Accountable and given full Einspruchsrecht**, especially those who have a vested interest in the outcome?
    • Have all the stake holders of the plan been Consulted for the plan – where does the buck stop?
    • Have all those who are affected by or involved in the implementation of the plan been Informed about the W-W-W-W-W-H**?
  • Is there ongoing review of progress against milestones, including cost reviews, so that timely action can be taken to rectify deviations from the plan?

** Einspruchsrecht  =  The right to partake in decisions which affect you.
** W-W-W-W-W-H  =  What, Why, When, Where, Who, How

ACTION

Review your Safety Improvement Plan (and other plans too) against the above six steps to avoid an Nkandlagate in your safety department.

FEEDBACK

Your feedback and comments are always welcome! Drop me a line!

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SCnSP – What’s Your Worth (MyBragBook.com)

♦♦  CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Jun 2013

In this series, I share with you my thoughts on Why Safety Is An Issue For Most Companies. One of the Things We Must Address If We Want To Improve Our Safety Performance is the importance of recognition, constructive criticism, tracking progress and acting on feedback.

     

What’s Your Worth?

My Brag Book

Picture: Testimonials and Client Feedback

     

As a safety professional or department, you are providing a service to all the employees of your company. It is a challenge to judge how you are doing as a service provider. What is the perceived value you bring to the business? You should see yourself as an independent consultant. What would the people you serve do if they had a choice to use whomever they prefer as a safety provider? Would they rather hire someone else?

The best way to get feedback is to simply ASK for it. ASK the people you serve and do not assume. ASK: “What value did my talk, service, input, advice, etc. add for you?” I have yet to find someone who refused to oblige, when asked.

Here are a few tips on how to ASK:

  • Keep it simple. One question and not a list of 10.
  • If the reply is negative, then use the feedback as a foundation for ‘unpacking’ – What? Why? and How?
  • Record it as a short interview on video or audio, or request an email.
  • Feedback or survey forms are a waste of time, most of the time. They are prone to the ‘Tick-Tick’ syndrome. Often just one negative comment sticks in your mind and gives you the feeling of ‘failure’.
  • Do not take it personally if the feedback / criticism is negative.
  • Always thank the people giving you the feedback for having made the time and effort to point out alternative options.
  • Ask for feedback right after the event / intervention / service / project.

One of the core motivators for most people is RECOGNITION. Keep a BragBook or file of your achievements. Self-appraisal helps you and your team to re-energise and stay on track. As a keynote speaker at safety events, I get my feedback from:

  • The audience reaction during my talk.
  • People who speak to me after the event and people quoting phrases I used in my talk – like ‘YEBO BABA!‘.
  • People buying my book, because they want a ‘piece of me’ to take home / to sustain the message I gave them.

In addition, I ASK for written feedback or get a video recording of feedback from the event organiser or MC, which gives me a good measure of how well I met their expectations.

See my online BragBook for some of my highly-valued client feedback.

ACTION

Keep a BragBook or Feedback File. Keep it up to date. Review it every so often – it’s a great way for you and your team to feel good and stay motivated. It has the added benefit of helping you to get perspective on your achievements and the progress you are making.

It is too easy in our ‘crazy busy’ life to feel lost and demotivated. List those things which you and your team have completed and which make you proud. Collect photos, videos and written testimonials as well as scanned images of documents.

In my personal BragBook, apart from photos and videos, I have a copy of my property’s title deed, cuttings from newsletter or newspaper articles, certificates of achievement, performance graphs, posters & logos, letters of appointment, articles I have written and testimonials from people I have coached, or who have read my book.

SEND YOUR FEEDBACK

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SCnSP – Action Speaks Louder Than Words

♦♦  CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Apr 2013

In this series, I share with you my thoughts on Why Safety Is An Issue For Most Companies. One of the Things We Must Address If We Want To Improve Our Safety Performance is the role of leadership.

     

Action Speaks Louder Than Words

Picture: Toolbox

     

I always say to people:

There is nothing which moves people more than ACTION
and nothing which is more powerful
than prompt, pro-active ACTION.

I then follow this up with:

Talking about the smart tools you have in your toolbox
is not the same as getting the job done.

We are masters at being re-active, especially when we have problems or if the old system / plan is not delivering results. We are good at:

  • Setting up too many initiatives and thrusts and over complicating things.
  • Talking and making new plans or setting up new systems.
  • Writing new policies and procedures.
  • Putting things on papers or posters (just a piece of paper).

Many years back, I had a mentor Jan Lys, who was a real “Staatmaker” (a person you can depend on). He taught me the following piece of wisdom:

Be the master of your deeds,
not the slave of your words.

Many of us are poor at:

  • Taking ACTION, pro-active ACTION – doing and implementing and measuring progress / results.
  • Breaking plans down into small doable stepping stones with milestones.
  • Communicating and engaging people and giving feedback.
  • Completing / finishing – “It’s done when you’re finished; it’s complete when it doesn’t come back to bite you for 5 years” Thomas Leonard
  • Perseverance, sticking to the basics and improving on the results.
  • Making our change efforts lead to real, sustainable transformation.

ACTION

In line with what I am preaching, here is something for you to do, but only if you are serious about taking ACTION.

Design a survey, best in the form of a ballot paper, to ask all your people what they think about the ACTION you are taking in safety.

It is most important that you ask those people who ‘push the buttons and use the tools’, as they see the ACTION taken where it counts, namely where the rubber hits the road. Ask them to be brutally honest with you. Keep it simple and only identify whether the feedback is from a ‘player’ or a ‘coach’ and from which area or function.

When you are done, follow the 3 F approach – Feedback, Fast, and Fair. Tell your people what the results of the ballot are and, most importantly, what you are going to do about it = ACTION you are going to take!

SEND YOUR FEEDBACK

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SoSSB 10P 10 Pro-active Action

♦ SERIES ♦♦   SAFETY ON A SHOESTRING BUDGET   ♦♦ SERIES ♦

PRO-ACTIVE  ACTION

Safety Tip #10 in the series

  ◊  PREVENTION   ◊  PURPOSE
  ◊  PREPARATION   ◊  PEOPLE
  ◊  PROBLEMS   ◊  PAT-ON-BACK
  ◊  PLAN  ◊  PROGRESS
 ◊  PEN-TO-PAPER  ♦  PRO-ACTIVE

The purpose of this series is to give struggling-but-eager SHE professionals and practitioners, who are working for financially-constrained companies, pointers on how to get the safety awareness message across to both management and workers, on a shoestring budget.

“There is nothing which moves people more than ACTION,
and nothing which is more powerful than prompt, PRO-ACTIVE ACTION.”
Jurgen Tietz
Bias towards ACTION is what counts …
Bias for Action by Jurgen Tietz Safety Speaker
RE-ACTIVE vs PRO-ACTIVE

PRO-ACTIVE:
  “Acting in anticipation of future problems, needs, or changes.”
   Synonyms: farseeing, forward-looking
   Antonyms: half-baked, shortsighted
   (Merriam-Webster Student Dictionary)

RE-ACTIVE:
  Corrective action is taken following incidents and investigations.
  Often  wait-&-see-&-hope-for-the-best  instead of  take-charge-&-own-SAFETY.

One of the problems is that safety professionals are swamped with admin and paper work. Reports, statistics, emails and then, of course, one of the number one time wasters: meetings.

ACTION:

Analyse your activities.
  How many fall into the re-active category?
  Most people do 95% plus in response to things, audit findings, requests, etc.

Analyse the decisions taken in your safety meetings.
  Which are re-active vs. pro-active?
  How many of those are actually closed out and completed?

Remember:
  Near Miss = Near Hit

“Even if you are on the right track, you’ll get run over if you just sit there.”
Will Rogers
This wiki has more on the basics of “Being Pro-Active”: http://www.wikihow.com/Be-Proactive.
If you would like more detail on “Using Leading Performance Indicators”,
or would like a copy of my story on Being A Mainstay, request it here.
Want to comment on this SIMPLY SMART SAFETY™ Tip or share your insights with me?
You are more than welcome to do so here.
© Copyright:Jürgen Tietz

SoSSB 10P 09 Pen-To-Paper

♦ SERIES ♦♦   SAFETY ON A SHOESTRING BUDGET   ♦♦ SERIES ♦

PEN-TO-PAPER

Safety Tip #9 in the series

  ◊  PREVENTION   ◊  PURPOSE
  ◊  PREPARATION   ◊  PEOPLE
  ◊  PROBLEMS   ◊  PAT-ON-BACK
  ◊  PLAN  ◊  PROGRESS
  ♦  PEN-TO-PAPER   ◊  PRO-ACTIVE

The purpose of this series is to give struggling-but-eager SHE professionals and practitioners, who are working for financially-constrained companies, pointers on how to get the safety awareness message across to both management and workers, on a shoestring budget.

PEN-TO-PAPER, OWNERSHIP and ACTION go hand-in-hand when it comes to implementing change and improving safety.

Changing well-entrenched habits and routines is a tricky business, requiring perseverance to push through the discomfort and resistance and inevitable desire to revert to the status quo. But the process of change can be oiled by sending, and making sure people get, the right message right.

To many people, walkabouts by management are seen like a royal state visit. The king & queen walking at the front and everyone else following behind, looking at what the king is looking at or finding wrong. Funny picture? For sure! So what needs to change?

The plant / office / site owners should be leading the walk about, because they know their area. They know where the good, bad and ugly things are which the team should be looking at to improve and reinforce safety.

PEN-TO-PAPER Everyone walking about must make it a HABIT to take their OWN NOTES and take OWNERSHIP and ACTION for fixing or improving things. That is 100 times better than waiting for a report from head office in 4 weeks’ time! Often that is anyway too late – safety ACTION needs to be taken promptly, pro-actively, NOW.

One most powerful reason for putting PEN-TO-PAPER is what it signals to the people on the plant / site / office. They see and take note of who is writing, because that sends a message that this must be important because the ‘boss’ is making a note. However, BEWARE, because this also creates an expectation – that something will be done.

Bottom line: do not only WRITE, but ACT upon what you have noted, and, most importantly, make your intentions to act known to those who are seeing you write.
If you would like a copy of my ‘experiments’ with change, you can request it here.
Want to comment on this SIMPLY SMART SAFETY™ Tip or share your insights with me?
You are more than welcome to do so here.
© Copyright:Jürgen Tietz

SoSSB 10P 07 Plan

♦ SERIES ♦♦   SAFETY ON A SHOESTRING BUDGET   ♦♦ SERIES ♦

PLAN

Safety Tip #7 in the series

  ◊  PREVENTION   ◊  PURPOSE
  ◊  PREPARATION   ◊  PEOPLE
  ◊  PROBLEMS   ◊  PAT-ON-BACK
  ♦  PLAN   ◊  PROGRESS
  ◊  PEN-TO-PAPER   ◊  PRO-ACTIVE

The purpose of this series is to give struggling-but-eager SHE professionals and practitioners, who are working for financially-constrained companies, pointers on how to get the safety awareness message across to both management and workers, on a shoestring budget.

Today’s topic, PLAN, is a reminder that “FAILING TO PLAN = PLANNING TO FAIL” and that “THINK SAFETY” means keeping safety at the forefront of everyone’s mind.

Production people are thinking about producing / output.
Engineers are thinking about designing and fixing stuff.
Logistics people are thinking about delivering the right stuff on time.

That is their number 1 priority, and for them, Safety, Health & Environmental impact are at the bottom of their list.

SAFETY

SAFETY at forefront of mind

♦ it is not rocket science, but a MINDSET
   ♦ it is keeping safety TOP-OF-MIND in all we do or use, from design to operation
   ♦ it is THINKING about the consequences of our actions
♦ it is not driving safety in a re-active manner – reacting to accidents and incidents
   ♦ it is about PRO-ACTIVE PLANNING for ONGOING safety improvements
   ♦ it is about a Plan on how to do it SAFER, BETTER, CHEAPER
The best plans are those that are
drawn up and owned by the people who will implement the actions.
back of matchbox safety plan
Better to have a back-of-the-match-box or
written-on-a-serviette plan, which is
        ♦ alive and well
        ♦ being worked on and implemented
 
than to have the grand affair forced onto people from above
        ♦ ending up full of dust and out of date
        ♦ in the bottom drawer of a cabinet.
ACTION

           Always ask   ♦ Where is YOUR Safety Improvement Plan?
           Always ask   ♦ Who OWNS it?
           Always ask   ♦ Can I SEE it?
“Uithaal en Wys” is what counts, not a lot of “yada-yada”

If you want my doc on “HOW TO KEEP SAFETY TOP-OF-MIND”, you can request it here.
Want to comment on this SIMPLY SMART SAFETY™ Tip or share your insights with me?
You are more than welcome to do so here.
© Copyright:Jürgen Tietz
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