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SpEd_CA H&S Rep Seminar – Apr 2018

♦♦  SAVE THE DATE!  ♦♦
17-18 April 2018

Save the date

The Disruptive Safety Antzi’s are at it again, bringing you the

Not Just Any H&S Rep Training

Who’s it for?

Everyone who wants to own their workplace safety.

What makes it different?

Exactly that. If you’ve had enough of relying only on legislation, rules, regulations and procedures, if you’re ready to step up to the plate and make your workplace safety an everyday reality, practical and effective – then we’re the ones to show you how to make it happen.

When?

17-18 April 2018

Where?

Birchwood Conference Venue and Hotel

Want to know more?

Visit our website

Ready to register?

Complete the registration form and send it to us.

Jürgen and Natalie

ESSENTIAL LINKS

Icon: Jurgen-Antzi with a mike

Disruptive Safety™ and The Safety Rep’s Survival Guide  –  what it is and why you need it

Let me help your staff reflect upon, recommit to and be responsible for championing your safety culture.

Search the S.H.E. ATM  –  for safety and wellness answers, tools and methods

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SpEd_CA – H&S Rep Workshop Mar 2018

♦♦  SAVE THE DATE!  ♦♦

Save the date

The Disruptive Safety Antzi’s are at it again and this time they’re bringing you the

Not Just Any H&S Rep Training

Who’s it for?

Everyone who wants to own their workplace safety.

What makes it different?

Exactly that. If you’ve had enough of relying only on legislation, rules, regulations and procedures, if you’re ready to step up to the plate and make your workplace safety an everyday reality, practical and effective – then we’re the ones to show you how to make it happen.

When?

6-7 March 2018

Where?

Birchwood Conference Venue and Hotel

Want to know more?

Get the information leaflet (which includes the registration form).

Ready to register?

Complete the registration form and send it to us.

ps. There’s an early bird discount, so don’t waste any time!

Jürgen and Natalie

ESSENTIAL LINKS

Icon: Jurgen-Antzi with a mike

Disruptive Safety™ and The Safety Rep’s Survival Guide  –  what it is and why you need it

Let me help your staff reflect upon, recommit to and be responsible for championing your safety culture.

Search the S.H.E. ATM  –  for safety and wellness answers, tools and methods

Contact Jürgen

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SCnSP – Safety First … Really?

♦♦♦   SAFETY CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE   ♦♦♦

In this series, I share with you my thoughts on Why Safety Is An Issue For Most Companies. One of the Things We Must Address If We Want To Improve Our Safety Performance is to assist our frontline managers as they strive to pilot for success on the wings of safety.

SAFETY FIRST … Really?

The Frontline Influence on Safety Culture

Wherever I go, I hear Safety First. I have yet to come across a company where people will say safety comes second or, heaven forbid, last. They all say safety comes first, because it is the right thing to say, especially in a formal audit. It is also the message that you find in the mission statements, values and other directives generated in the board rooms.

But, what happens, there, where the cookies are made and the rubber hits the road? Does safety come first at the coal face and on the shop floor?

Often, in reality, at the heat of the furnace or in the back alleys of the factory or at the thumping production press or deep underground at the end of the night shift, safety does not come first. For those people who ‘push the buttons and use the tools’ and those who directly manage them, it is a different story. Safety has to compete with many other issues and priorities.

You might be thinking, “Has Jürgen gone nuts? Is this man who lives and preaches safety making concessions?”

Let me explain.

In most companies, there are a multitude of thrusts (often 20 or more) pushed down the organisation to drive the business forward – output, costs, quality, productivity and continuous improvement, personal performance and empowerment, research and development, to name but a few. Then there are compliance issues, laws and regulations, systems and procedures and hundreds of rules and standards, plus the need for accreditation and branding. Each department in head office, including Safety, issues instructions, requests for information and sundry other requirements. All of this has a direct and overwhelming impact on frontline managers and their teams. One of the most frequent complaints I get from this level is that they are ‘forced’ to manage on their seats instead of on their feet and that output and costs are most important!

"First and second line managers are the critical links in bringing a company’s culture to life. At Pfizer, these frontline managers strongly influence the day-to-day working environment of about 80 percent of colleagues."[1]

I could not agree more, especially a company’s safety culture.

The best way to describe the job of the frontline manager is to compare it to that of a surgeon. The surgeon cuts open the patient on the operating table to remove a tumour. He/she has to keep an eye on the vital signs, watch out for bleeding, make instant decisions and balance all the options. There is no time to read the manual and there are no second chances.

In a similar manner, safety is just one of many concerns that the frontline manager needs to take into consideration. This means that we have a responsibility to help the frontline managers to manage the total risk and balance the priorities within the limited resources at their disposal. Why? Simply because, often, when safety is held in the balance against, for example, production, it is the safety ball that will be dropped as it is perceived to have the least direct consequences. This is a tough call for us safety professionals, especially when it comes to influencing and supporting the safety culture at the frontline.

For many years I have used the analogy of an airplane to illustrate to the people who ‘push the buttons and use the tools’ how all these business elements, including safety, need to work together in order for the company to prosper.

picture of an airplane showing how various business elements work together for prosperity

The engines are those things which drive the business forward and result in profit. These are normally Output, Costs, People, Continuous Improvement and the like. Depending on the kind of business, sales & marketing, research & development and customer service & support also add to the profits. The key message here is balance in the thrust provided by all the engines. You cannot fly if you put all the power on say the Cost engine and throttle the other engines in the process.

The airframe consists of the wings and the fuselage. The wings represent safety and support the engines. The wings have to be strong and flexible at the same time. In addition to that, the wings provide the lift, critical for the plane to remain airborne and reach a safe cruising level.

Safety does not directly contribute to profits,
but it supports all those activities that do
.

The fuselage consists of those items which you will normally find in the company’s values and mission statements. These include Quality, Care & Respect, Fairness, Honesty & Integrity, Communication, Teamwork, Excellence, Accountability & Reliability, Innovation & Creativity and Recognition & Rewards.

The dashboard of the airplane shows the pilot (frontline manager) the target – what is the destination, cruising height & speed, direction, as well as other critical parameters. In order to use this information, there has to be constant measurement and feedback to the pilot so that appropriate action can be taken timeously to ensure a safe flight.

ACTION

  • Use the above analogy of an airplane to explain to all employees why safety plays such a key role, but that it also has to be balanced with all the other priorities.
  • Organise facilitated workshops with the frontline managers to ask them what you, as safety professionals, should be doing to help them with SAFETY. Give them “Einspruchsrecht”[2].
  • Change your approach to toolbox / safety talks. Rather than glossing over safety for a few minutes every day at the start of shift / production meetings, hold a specific session once a week or once every two weeks and dedicate half an hour to focus purely on safety. Prepare a number of specific toolbox talks for the frontline manager to use to focus on safety.[3]

[1]    “Shape your culture, shape your company’s future“, Ian C Read, Pfizer.
[2]    “Einspruchsrecht” – a person’s right to partake in decisions which affect him/her.
[3]    DIY Safety

RELATED LINKS

Put on An Overall

Under the Knife

Toolbox Talks – Ask me for help with these, in need.

FEEDBACK

Your feedback and comments are always welcome! Drop me a line!

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SCnSP – The Best Audits

♦♦  CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Oct 2013

In this series, I share with you my thoughts on Why Safety Is An Issue For Most Companies. One of the Things We Must Address If We Want To Improve Our Safety Performance is to examine the purpose for Safety Audits and how this necessary practice can be used as an improvement tool.

     

The Best Audits

     

If your company operates on the principle that safety audits are carried out by Safety Professionals for the purpose of policing non-compliance to “The Rules and Standards”, then read on.

The safety fraternity has adopted this practice from the accounting profession for good reason – inspecting, examining, checking and verifying of safety systems, procedures and equipment are all necessary. Sadly, the correction aspect is seldom seen as an improvement tool, and the safety audit, rather than being a means to an end, is merely the end itself.

So how do you facilitate a mindset shift from “This safety audit is a necessary evil of policing, inflicted by some external source (the Safety Professionals)” to “This safety audit is a powerful self-improvement tool ” ?

  1. Invest the time necessary to make sure everyone understands the fundamental purpose (in its entirety) for continuous safety audits, viz.

  2. Make safety auditing an on-going line responsibility (same as you do with output, costs, quality, etc.).
  3. The systems, rules and regulations, standards and procedures should not only be “in place” and working, but also be accepted and understood by all, so as to foster an ownership mentality.
  4. Auditing of plant and equipment, safety mechanisms, fire fighting, first aid, emergency equipment, interlocks, trips and alarms, instruments and other safety critical devices with a “look to see” mindset will highlight aspects that could be improved on.
  5. Make sure that the inspection, examination, verification and reporting aspect of a safety audit is not used as an excuse for “not having time” to workshop and implement improvements.

ACTION

'Stop unsafe practice' and 'Safety Champion Recognition' tool - isiZulu version

  • Issue each auditor with a set of 2 red and 4 green cards. Red to stop an unsafe practice / operation and green to recognise people who are doing the right or safe thing. This will force the auditors to look for the GOOD things and find safety champions to recognise.
  • Schedule time to coach line people to do self-audits. (This investment in time will save you plenty of time in the long run.) Then, at the annual Safety Day, recognise and reward those who self-audit well, instead of just those with the best metrics.
  • Auditor Hat - A practical application of the audit logos
    Audit Hat Logos e.g. PPE Examiner, Work Permit Specialist, Machinery Expert and more

  • Get the auditors to wear hats / badges, depicting the focus area which they will be looking at. This gives high visibility and at the same time ensures that each auditor is concentrating on one specific aspect of safety.
  • Although I am against paperwork, consider drawing up an audit preparation check list: What to do and have ready for an effective audit. Provide training for the ‘hosts’, as well as your team leaders and safety reps, on how to enable an audit.
  • Give feedback on the audit findings to the ‘players’ who “push the buttons and use the tools”, not only to the ‘coaches’ (managers). The players have just as much a role to play in the safety ‘game’!

DOWNLOAD

The Best Audits – Auditing vs Policing

RELATED READING

What’s in a Hat?

Back-end a Dead-end?

ASK ME ABOUT

COOL TOOL™ TOOLBOX TALKS – Topic: Checklists, Inspections and Audits”

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GM – SAFETY FEVER! – Let Nature Guide You

∴ϒ∴    SPRING EDITION    ∴ϒ∴

When I stood in the garden this morning, I marvelled at nature’s awesome ability to renew itself. Nature shows us the power of taking a rest in winter, of cutting out dead wood and shedding leaves and converting it all to compost. Nature puts all its energy into new growth, into refreshing the environment with a splendour of colour and fragrance, getting everyone excited and engaged in life once more.

 

SAFETY FEVER!

— Let Nature Guide You —

There are important safety lessons to be learnt from nature’s spring spectacle: Take a rest. Consolidate what you already have in place. Go back to basics. Make sure the foundation is sound. This is an audit approach with a twist.

I am not an advocate for spring cleaning because I believe that one should clean up after each job and on a daily basis. Neither do I support the ‘spring fever’ approach – a BIG fanfare, with lots of paper & posters and little ACTION. These often are a ‘flavour of the month’ and short lived. What you do need is a program of stepping stones for the coming season.

Spring is in the air

Doing novel and unique things as part of your program of stepping stones will make a sustainable difference. Vigorously add freshness and colour and get everyone engaged. Hold work stoppages to show your employees that leaders are serious about safety. Celebrate your safety champions and share the pockets of excellence throughout the year, not only during spring time!

Cut out dead wood. Purposefully search for those systems and procedures which are no longer relevant, or which never served a purpose in the first place, or where there is too much complexity. Keep it SIMPLE.

Talk and listen to the people who you expect to follow your rules, procedures and standards. Give them “Einspruchsrecht”(a). Check if employees understand, accept and adhere to rules, procedures and standards. Make sure your book of rules does not merely serve as shelf decoration.

ACTION

Nothing will get done unless you make it a full time job, make somebody (like one of your safety officials) responsible for getting rid of deadwood and for setting up a timetable to review all safety systems, procedures, rules and critical job instructions. Give those who are affected by all of these the right to partake in decisions which affect them. This goes way beyond the traditional job observation approach.

The appointed person should also identify gaps and shortcomings of existing operations which should be embraced by suitable safeguards. The overall purpose should be to SIMPLIFY, not to add to the complexity, rules or regulations.

(a)  Einspruchsrecht”  =  A person’s right to partake in decisions which affect him/her.

RELATED LINKS

Safety on a Shoestring Budget – Addressing Problems

Safety as a Value

Safety for Safety’s Sake

FEEDBACK

Your feedback and comments are always welcome! Drop me a line!

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Presentations & Workshops

 

PEOPLE and SAFETY

 

WORKSHOPS

 

SAFETY COMPLIANCE is serious.

VUKA! VUSA! Wake Up! Rise up! Boot Camp by eKhuluma and impleX

Lots of rules and regulations.

WAKE UP! RISE UP!
Change procrastination and disinterest into PRO-ACTIVE ACTION.

 

PRESENTATIONS & KEYNOTES

These are always customised based on the client’s needs with respect to objectives, desired results, safety logos, safety slogans and more. One or more of the following elements are incorporated, depending on what the client wants and the target audience.

 

Leadership in Safety

THE POWER OF A DREAM™ Leadership Bootcamp

LEADERS: This is for you! –
Learn about what it takes to achieve WORLD CLASS SAFETY.

 

Vote for Safety by Jurgen Tietz

VOTE FOR SAFETY™ Process

Get COMMITMENT TO SAFE BEHAVIOUR – hold an ELECTION!

 

Mirror Technique by Jurgen Tietz

PUTTING A FACE TO SAFETY Audit

Mirror, mirror, on the wall –
The GOOD, the BAD, and the UGLY, with feedback.

 

Mirror Technique by Jurgen Tietz

TALKING TO THE DEAD

You only live once? False. You live every day. You only DIE once.

 

Jurgen Tietz - Safety Clock

The SAFETY CLOCK

12 Rules of Behaviour, around the clock.

 

Jurgen Tietz - Safety Man

The SAFETY MAN

Demonstrating the many roles & responsibilities of the SHE practitioner.

 

Safety VIPs are Croc Hunters

The CROCODILE’S TALE Presentation

So what does the CROCODILE have to do with SAFETY?

 

Jurgen Tietz - Safety Song

The SAFETY SONG

Build up team spirit & safety camaraderie.

 

 

PEOPLE and LIFE

 

RETRENCHMENT & Post-retrenchment

For the ‘survivors’

 

MANUFACTURING

Leadership & teamwork (Ibhubesi = The Lion)

 

LIFE SKILLS

Habits, Paradigms, Self-esteem & Self-influencing

Speed Limit Syndrome

Picture this.I enter the premises of a big company.
There are road works ahead – barricades, detour markers, a speed limit sign … the works.

Nothing wrong with that.
EXCEPT, the sign reads 20 kph.
Now this is where the problem lies.

I pull aside and observe what happens.

The road is straight and clear and one vehicle after the other drives past me at 40 and even 60 kph, totally ignoring the speed limit of 20.

Why, you may ask, did these drivers not adhere to the 20 kph speed limit?

Because it is human nature to ignore rules and regulations (in this case speed limits and other traffic signs) that are judged to be unreasonable.

This is what I call the Speed Limit Syndrome and it happens alot on public roads too, as we all know.

One of the worst practices on our roads is that signs are not being immediately removed when the road works or the need for the sign no longer exists! This encourages a culture of not taking traffic signs, or, for that matter, rules and regulations, seriously, because they are deemed to be unreasonable and/or obsolete.

I urge you to watch out for this trap in your own operations.

Make sure that your rules and regulations are necessary, realistic and truly serve the purpose of safeguarding people. When people ignore your rules and regulations, first ask if they are not being perceived as unreasonable and, if so, why.

The flip side of this coin is equally important. Once you are 100% sure that your rules and regulations are necessary and realistic, then you have to enforce them – ruthlessly. You have to discipline those who ignore and break the rules and regulations!

Be safe – the SIMPLY SMART way,

Jürgen

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