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SCnSP – See it, Believe it, Do it

♦♦  SAFETY CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Apr 2016
     

See It, Believe It, Do it

(Awareness, Trust, Action)

graphic depicting the steps to it

     

Getting results in safety is not about only one thing – it’s about three things:
People need to see safety and they need to believe in safety before they will do safety.
Actually, safety is about four things, because to believe someone, you have to trust that person.

To see is to create awareness. Usually this is done via awareness posters, toolbox talks, even walk-abouts or audits. But this doesn’t necessarily translate into action or a change in behaviour.

So, getting people to believe in safety is more complicated. It requires trust and respect. Trust comes from experience, from word of mouth, from promises fulfilled. Respect is given after actions are observed.

Trust is earned.
Respect is given.
Loyalty is demonstrated.

Betray any one of those and you lose all three.

Awareness and trust lead to action.

And action is what happens when someone actually goes and votes, or buys something, or shows up, or talks about it. And action is as complex as trust. Action requires overcoming the status quo, action means that someone has dealt with the many fears that come with change and felt that fear and still done something.” [1]

ACTION

Do you believe you can make a difference in safety?
Do you believe it is worth the effort?
What are you doing to earn the trust of your fellow workers and the respect of your leaders?
Are you taking action, or is the lure of “later” (procrastination) holding you back?

[1]    “Awareness, Trust and Action

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SCnSP – Ukuhlanya

♦♦♦  SAFETY CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦♦

In this series, I share with you my thoughts on Why Safety Is An Issue For Most Companies and the Things We Must Address If We Want To Improve Our Safety Performance. It’s time to tackle the  safety dilemma / paradox  of our times with a  disruptive approach to safety.

UKUHLANYA[1]

(Safety Paradox and Disruptive Safety)

How do you review your Safety Plan?

Let me give you some essential background before I suggest the actions.

It started when I realised that, for most of our plans, it is a case of insanity i.e. doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result[2].

Expectations have changed drastically, both for employers and employees. Employers expect more skills and competencies and at the same time more engagement and contribution from employees. Employees want more freedom in how they fulfil those expectations. It’s time to “acknowledge that the old method of productivity, of being a good employee by obediently doing what you are told, is obsolete. Our job is to figure out what’s next and to bring the ideas and resources to the table to make it happen.”[3]

graphic depicting lack of einspruchsrecht i.e. consultation

In addition, people have a much shorter attention span in these times of hashtags, selfies, iPhones and iPads. We have distorted the priority scale with the habit of responding immediately to the ring / tweet / vibration of the hand-held device. We have developed an attitude of “I want it and I want it now!” and people’s behaviour has changed accordingly. People are tired of posters, pamphlets and papers. The old systems of toolbox talks, presentations and preaching procedures no longer work that well. There is a new generation of employees who demand “einspruchsrecht”[4] and full engagement.

The Safety Dilemma.

In this age of disruptive change, we have to do things better, faster, cheaper and safer or risk going out of business. We have to have people on board who think and create safety improvements. We have to let them experiment – try it, fix it and make it work. We have to make information-enabling technology available so as to free them up to do what they do best, like thinking, creating, etc. The technology must engender independence not dependence, dependence being when you get what I call the “auto pilot syndrome” = pilots who can no longer fly themselves out of an emergency.

At the same time, we want people to manage the risks and to not take chances. We want people to look-to-see and listen-to-hear. So, we have to enforce our cardinal or lifesaving rules and, in the process, pile on a myriad of procedures, instructions and standards. For example, to avoid traffic accidents, keep to the left, drive a road worthy vehicle, be a competent, licensed driver and obey the road signs are non-negotiable!

Ultimately, for most, safety becomes a compliance issue: measure injury rates, deviations from procedures, near ‘misses’, non-compliant behaviour, etc. When the fear-based compliance manifests, we are unhappy. We want people to do the right thing because it is the safe thing to do, not because they’re going to be caught and / or fined.

We want to keep it safe and simple but we still need to be in control. It is a tough balance to strike.

Control contains a peculiar paradox.
The more you impose control, the less control you have,
because it removes accountability from someone who should own the responsibility in the first place
.”[5]

The Safety Plan.

In most organizations, there is a fear of failure and thus things take too long, changes are analysed to death, projects are too intimidating and the approval levels are far too high up the hierarchy. The end result is that people get ‘busy’ with activities like meetings, investigations, proposals, etc. which do not actually produce an outcome. At the end of the day, the “big change” project on the safety plan just gets stuck – the ‘elephant’ cannot move, despite the best efforts of the ‘rider’. The ‘path’ becomes muddied.[6]

To get around this, we need to shrink the changes into smaller, bite sizes and rally the herd to drive safety forward. If we can invent, launch and complete projects in days, instead of weeks or months, its way more likely that these projects will be more relevant at the plant / team level.

If you want your employees to get enthusiastic about safety, give them something ‘they can take home’ and be proud of = something they accomplished. One hundred small projects, completed at this level, are worth much more than one big project battling to get traction.

ACTION

  • Instead of a grand revision of your safety improvement plan, go for a  Just Do Something SAFE™[7]  safety culture. Get your teams / plants to create their own safety projects. Carry out campaigns themed on “any cause, anytime, anywhere” that are safety-related, within their means and can be completed within days.
    I am not going to give you a template or a hundred examples, as that defeats the object of you owning this disruptive safety approach. I will, however, share with you a few trigger ideas: paint the workshop floor, erect a handrail, review and renew safety signs, clean out the store room, spring clean ‘my own work space’ week.
    Your challenge is to rally the herd using suitable encouragement and recognition.
  • If the above approach is too disruptive for you, then review your safety plan, but do not use the “Moses Approach”.[8]
    Consult your key stakeholders in safety, including SHE Reps, at their place of work – a kind of “Road Hear” (not “Show”) or “lekgotla”. Get them to tell you about their safety expectations, key safety issues, any quick hits and what they want to see happen. These sessions should be facilitated by a skilled, independent person and the outcome should be communicated back to all stakeholders, within a week or two.

ps. I am able and willing to facilitate either of these actions for you and to share some tools and techniques to manage the process. (T&C’S apply)

REFERENCE

[1]   “Ukuhlanya” = “insanity” in isiZulu

[2]   Albert Einstein, German physicist (1879-1955)

[3]   Seth Godin – sundry, thought-provoking posts

[4]   “Einspruchsrecht” = “the right of people to partake in decisions which affect them”, a German expression

[5]   “Beyond Management”, by Etsko Schuitema

[6]   Analogy from “Switch”, by Chip and Dan Heath

[7]   Spring-boarding on DoSomething, which is a stellar success, a fast-growing non-profit that’s engaging with millions of young people around the world.

[8]   “Moses Approach” = where leaders huddle together in the boardroom to work out the new vision, strategy, plan or some other directive, based on assumptions, and which they expect the troops to eagerly embrace without having been consulted about what is actually required.

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GM – Road Safety – Year-End “Take Safety Home” Message

♦♦♦    Road Safety    ♦♦♦

Year-End Take Safety Home Message

Those of you who have been following me for some time know how passionate I am about this topic. We kill nearly ten times more people on our roads each year than ALL industrial fatalities combined in all workplaces. Chances are that if you are going to lose someone over the holiday season, it will be on the roads. This is not only via vehicle accidents – pedestrian fatalities account for approximately 40% of road-related deaths.

graphic of ambulance with money

We are able to release last year’s crime statistics in the greatest of detail so the SAPS can plan and focus on the right hot spots. But, in spite of substantial funding, the Department of Transports Road Traffic Management Corporation is unable to provide road accident statistics, because they are “reengineering the Road Traffic information collection process”. In terms of road safety, we are effectively flying blind. I cannot give you the exact figure, but I can tell you that the cost of road accidents runs into billions – we could easily build and maintain our road infrastructure if we could halve our accidents.

We all know that we cannot improve something which we are not measuring and the latest road traffic data is from 2011! We can be as concerned as we like about the current situation, but we can only influence what is within our control. Therefore, let us influence our employees to become ACTIVE SAFE road users.

There are three things which kill people on the roads ( F S D )

The first is FATIGUE. If people are tired and take their eyes off the road, the likelihood of accidents shoots up dramatically. Thus encourage the habit of taking a break and getting enough sleep before a road trip.

SPEED is the second killer. Speed reduces the opportunity to react to any unforeseen event and stay in control!

DRINKING (Drugs) is the third killer. Alcohol has a disastrous effect on your reaction time as well as staying awake and alert.

ACTION

1. Draw up your plan for the year-end now! Involve your SHE Reps in that planning – empower them to play an ACTIVE role in implementing some of the ideas below, as well as coming up with their own suggestions.
2. Road Safety Cookie
  graphic of ambulance with money This is a small hand-out to engage ALL your employees in road safety and to remind them to take a safety attitude with them when going home for the holidays.
These Road Safety Cookies™ have been specifically branded with road safety signs and the cookie inserts are road safety messages.
There are many ways to use this COOL TOOL™.
  One idea is to put the name(s) of employees killed during the year in road accidents on the back of the cookie inserts eg. + IN MEMORY OF +
I will assist you with customisation to meet your specific needs.
More ideas
on how to use the Safety Cookies here.
3. Road Safety Toolbox Talks. I am offering this series of 6 CD’s at a special discount of R2,750. These CD’s are part of my COOL TOOL™ Toolbox Talks and cover the Road Safety Topics of Seat Belts, Attitude, Road Signs, Pedestrians and vehicles – download the overview.
3. Advanced Driving Safety Rules. Get your SHE Reps to hand out a leaflet, with advanced driving tips, to everyone leaving your premises when taking their year-end break.
If you need ideas for this, send me an email.
4. Look at activities you can sponsor at schools in your neighbourhood, for example driving lessons or driving simulators for schools.

RELATED MATERIAL

A Hong Kong movie theatre asks its patrons to leave their cell phones ON when they enter the movie house. Using that, Volkswagen made an eye opening advertisement.

Have you been tagged?
Caught at a road block
Taking your eye off the ball / road / task
Walking the circle of safety
Safety misconceptions – what we can learn from them
Manslaughter or murder?

REFERENCE MATERIAL

  • RTMC latest annual report is 2012- 2013. (If you look at Section 8, in particular the part which reviews the achievement of their strategic objective “improve collection of data” on page 56, you will find that they did not achieve KPI 32 = State of Road Safety Report. The financials are in Section 9 on page 71.)
  • Arrive Alive has no up to date info either – last report is 2011.

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SCnSP – Safety First … Really?

♦♦♦   SAFETY CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE   ♦♦♦

In this series, I share with you my thoughts on Why Safety Is An Issue For Most Companies. One of the Things We Must Address If We Want To Improve Our Safety Performance is to assist our frontline managers as they strive to pilot for success on the wings of safety.

SAFETY FIRST … Really?

The Frontline Influence on Safety Culture

Wherever I go, I hear Safety First. I have yet to come across a company where people will say safety comes second or, heaven forbid, last. They all say safety comes first, because it is the right thing to say, especially in a formal audit. It is also the message that you find in the mission statements, values and other directives generated in the board rooms.

But, what happens, there, where the cookies are made and the rubber hits the road? Does safety come first at the coal face and on the shop floor?

Often, in reality, at the heat of the furnace or in the back alleys of the factory or at the thumping production press or deep underground at the end of the night shift, safety does not come first. For those people who ‘push the buttons and use the tools’ and those who directly manage them, it is a different story. Safety has to compete with many other issues and priorities.

You might be thinking, “Has Jürgen gone nuts? Is this man who lives and preaches safety making concessions?”

Let me explain.

In most companies, there are a multitude of thrusts (often 20 or more) pushed down the organisation to drive the business forward – output, costs, quality, productivity and continuous improvement, personal performance and empowerment, research and development, to name but a few. Then there are compliance issues, laws and regulations, systems and procedures and hundreds of rules and standards, plus the need for accreditation and branding. Each department in head office, including Safety, issues instructions, requests for information and sundry other requirements. All of this has a direct and overwhelming impact on frontline managers and their teams. One of the most frequent complaints I get from this level is that they are ‘forced’ to manage on their seats instead of on their feet and that output and costs are most important!

"First and second line managers are the critical links in bringing a company’s culture to life. At Pfizer, these frontline managers strongly influence the day-to-day working environment of about 80 percent of colleagues."[1]

I could not agree more, especially a company’s safety culture.

The best way to describe the job of the frontline manager is to compare it to that of a surgeon. The surgeon cuts open the patient on the operating table to remove a tumour. He/she has to keep an eye on the vital signs, watch out for bleeding, make instant decisions and balance all the options. There is no time to read the manual and there are no second chances.

In a similar manner, safety is just one of many concerns that the frontline manager needs to take into consideration. This means that we have a responsibility to help the frontline managers to manage the total risk and balance the priorities within the limited resources at their disposal. Why? Simply because, often, when safety is held in the balance against, for example, production, it is the safety ball that will be dropped as it is perceived to have the least direct consequences. This is a tough call for us safety professionals, especially when it comes to influencing and supporting the safety culture at the frontline.

For many years I have used the analogy of an airplane to illustrate to the people who ‘push the buttons and use the tools’ how all these business elements, including safety, need to work together in order for the company to prosper.

picture of an airplane showing how various business elements work together for prosperity

The engines are those things which drive the business forward and result in profit. These are normally Output, Costs, People, Continuous Improvement and the like. Depending on the kind of business, sales & marketing, research & development and customer service & support also add to the profits. The key message here is balance in the thrust provided by all the engines. You cannot fly if you put all the power on say the Cost engine and throttle the other engines in the process.

The airframe consists of the wings and the fuselage. The wings represent safety and support the engines. The wings have to be strong and flexible at the same time. In addition to that, the wings provide the lift, critical for the plane to remain airborne and reach a safe cruising level.

Safety does not directly contribute to profits,
but it supports all those activities that do
.

The fuselage consists of those items which you will normally find in the company’s values and mission statements. These include Quality, Care & Respect, Fairness, Honesty & Integrity, Communication, Teamwork, Excellence, Accountability & Reliability, Innovation & Creativity and Recognition & Rewards.

The dashboard of the airplane shows the pilot (frontline manager) the target – what is the destination, cruising height & speed, direction, as well as other critical parameters. In order to use this information, there has to be constant measurement and feedback to the pilot so that appropriate action can be taken timeously to ensure a safe flight.

ACTION

  • Use the above analogy of an airplane to explain to all employees why safety plays such a key role, but that it also has to be balanced with all the other priorities.
  • Organise facilitated workshops with the frontline managers to ask them what you, as safety professionals, should be doing to help them with SAFETY. Give them “Einspruchsrecht”[2].
  • Change your approach to toolbox / safety talks. Rather than glossing over safety for a few minutes every day at the start of shift / production meetings, hold a specific session once a week or once every two weeks and dedicate half an hour to focus purely on safety. Prepare a number of specific toolbox talks for the frontline manager to use to focus on safety.[3]

[1]    “Shape your culture, shape your company’s future“, Ian C Read, Pfizer.
[2]    “Einspruchsrecht” – a person’s right to partake in decisions which affect him/her.
[3]    DIY Safety

RELATED LINKS

Put on An Overall

Under the Knife

Toolbox Talks – Ask me for help with these, in need.

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D1STEM – Fire, Fire, Fire ….

♦ SERIES ♦    DO ONE SAFETY THING EACH MONTH    ♦ SERIES ♦

If you do just one thing a month to change the safety mind-set, in one year you will have done 12 things to raise safety awareness. Every month you will receive one such SAFETY TIP.

Fire, Fire, Fire …
Number 1 Incident At Home

“ FIRE, FIRE, JÜRGEN HEEEELP, FIRE! ”

This was the bone chilling distress cry I heard from the bedroom. Weeks later, every time I go into the bedroom, I still smell burnt plastic, which impregnated the curtains and left a layer of fine black soot everywhere. It still sends shivers down my spine.

We were watching TV in the bedroom when I smelt something burning, but I ignored it. There was a brief flicker on the screen and then everything went back to normal and I assumed it ‘came right by itself’. The TV screen went black and the smell got worse. I unplugged the TV. Assuming that all is safe now, I headed for the kitchen to make a cup of tea, only to run back to the bedroom in top gear when I heard my wife Heidi screaming for HELP! There were flames behind the TV.

picture depicting a woman using a fire extinguisher to put out a fire

In a state of panic I heaved the TV off the shelf and onto the bed, not thinking of the consequences this could have. Within seconds, Heidi was back in the bedroom, having fetched the fire extinguisher from the kitchen, but by that time I had managed to smother the flames with a wet bathroom towel. Our cat, Lula, had bolted from the bed, without ‘packing her suitcase’, not to be seen until the next day!

Fire is one of those things which has two sides to it.

On the one side we have the ‘friendly’ fire, which invites us to come and sit closer and enjoy the warmth of its crackling energy. We also use this fire in a controlled manner to cook our meals, produce steam to generate electric power and drive most of our chemical processes. We have learnt to harness the risk of such a fire getting out of control and thus feel complacent and safe with fire.

The second kind of fire is the ‘hostile’ fire, the one which is out of our control. It is the number one killer in homes. These fires sow fear and panic and lead to death and destruction. In spite of this, a distinct ‘It won’t happen to me’ mind-set is apparent when we watch news reports about yet another shattering squatter camp inferno.

You might say that my wife and I were lucky, that this was a near miss. I see it as a near hit with important lessons – lessons which are clear and begged me to take action:

  • I ignored the warning signs. At the first smell of something burning, I should have switched off the TV and isolated the power, instead of assuming it had ‘come right’.
  • Even though Heidi had the presence of mind and knew where the fire extinguishers are kept, she later told me she had no idea how to use a fire extinguisher. I had never trained her, nor, for that matter, Nomveliso and Dowelani, who help in and around the house.
  • I did not make sure everyone in our home knows where to find the emergency numbers in case of fire or having to call an ambulance.

In another incident, which took place two weeks later, we were awoken early one morning by the frantic ringing of our door bell. It was our neighbour, Emanuel, pleading for HELP. The gas heater in his room had burst into flames! This time I was more composed and rushed over to his house with the fire extinguisher and put out the flames.

I don’t know what the warning signs were in this case, but the cause was clear. The rubber pipe, which connects to the gas bottle, was corroded and had sprung a leak. Emanuel was ill prepared to deal with the situation and there was no fire extinguisher in the house.

ACTION

  • Use these as examples of what you want your employees to bring to toolbox talks when you ask them for incidents which happened off site.
  • Put together a safety brief urging your employees to inspect the cables and fittings of their electrical appliances as well as the pipes of their gas appliances, especially heaters.
  • Supply each employee with a fire extinguisher to take home, or at least arrange a deal where employees can purchase fire extinguishers through your company at discounted / cost prices.
  • Issue each employee with a simple emergency procedure which they can practice at home with their families and staff. This should include a vinyl sticker for emergency numbers.
  • Hold a family firefighting day at your company premises to give employees and the families an opportunity to practice firefighting.

Today is …

link to more information on World Environment Day 2014

“ If the earth were only a few feet in diameter …
and floating a few feet above a field somewhere, people would come from everywhere to marvel at it. People would walk around it, marveling at its big pools of water, its little pools and the water flowing between the pools. People would marvel at the bumps on it, and the holes in it, and they would marvel at the thin layer of gas surrounding it and the water suspended in the gas. The people would marvel at all the creatures walking around on the surface of the ball, and at the creatures in the water. The people would declare it precious because it was the only one, and they would protect it so that it would not be hurt. The ball would be the greatest wonder known, and people would come to behold it, to be healed, to gain knowledge, to know beauty and to wonder how it could be. People would love it, and defend it with their lives because they would somehow know that their lives, their own roundness, could be nothing without it
If the Earth were only a few feet in diameter. ”
~ Joe Miller ~

graphic of link to video of poem

FROM THE ARCHIVES

    It’s My Mistake

    Are You Serious About Safety At Home?

    ‘Milk Bottle’ Hunt

ON OFFER

Get loads more SAFETY TIPS when you buy my KNOCK-OUT SAFETY TIPS! CD from my DIY SAFETY COOL TOOL™ range of products. More info available here.

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SCnSP – The Best Audits

♦♦  CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Oct 2013

In this series, I share with you my thoughts on Why Safety Is An Issue For Most Companies. One of the Things We Must Address If We Want To Improve Our Safety Performance is to examine the purpose for Safety Audits and how this necessary practice can be used as an improvement tool.

     

The Best Audits

     

If your company operates on the principle that safety audits are carried out by Safety Professionals for the purpose of policing non-compliance to “The Rules and Standards”, then read on.

The safety fraternity has adopted this practice from the accounting profession for good reason – inspecting, examining, checking and verifying of safety systems, procedures and equipment are all necessary. Sadly, the correction aspect is seldom seen as an improvement tool, and the safety audit, rather than being a means to an end, is merely the end itself.

So how do you facilitate a mindset shift from “This safety audit is a necessary evil of policing, inflicted by some external source (the Safety Professionals)” to “This safety audit is a powerful self-improvement tool ” ?

  1. Invest the time necessary to make sure everyone understands the fundamental purpose (in its entirety) for continuous safety audits, viz.

  2. Make safety auditing an on-going line responsibility (same as you do with output, costs, quality, etc.).
  3. The systems, rules and regulations, standards and procedures should not only be “in place” and working, but also be accepted and understood by all, so as to foster an ownership mentality.
  4. Auditing of plant and equipment, safety mechanisms, fire fighting, first aid, emergency equipment, interlocks, trips and alarms, instruments and other safety critical devices with a “look to see” mindset will highlight aspects that could be improved on.
  5. Make sure that the inspection, examination, verification and reporting aspect of a safety audit is not used as an excuse for “not having time” to workshop and implement improvements.

ACTION

'Stop unsafe practice' and 'Safety Champion Recognition' tool - isiZulu version

  • Issue each auditor with a set of 2 red and 4 green cards. Red to stop an unsafe practice / operation and green to recognise people who are doing the right or safe thing. This will force the auditors to look for the GOOD things and find safety champions to recognise.
  • Schedule time to coach line people to do self-audits. (This investment in time will save you plenty of time in the long run.) Then, at the annual Safety Day, recognise and reward those who self-audit well, instead of just those with the best metrics.
  • Auditor Hat - A practical application of the audit logos
    Audit Hat Logos e.g. PPE Examiner, Work Permit Specialist, Machinery Expert and more

  • Get the auditors to wear hats / badges, depicting the focus area which they will be looking at. This gives high visibility and at the same time ensures that each auditor is concentrating on one specific aspect of safety.
  • Although I am against paperwork, consider drawing up an audit preparation check list: What to do and have ready for an effective audit. Provide training for the ‘hosts’, as well as your team leaders and safety reps, on how to enable an audit.
  • Give feedback on the audit findings to the ‘players’ who “push the buttons and use the tools”, not only to the ‘coaches’ (managers). The players have just as much a role to play in the safety ‘game’!

DOWNLOAD

The Best Audits – Auditing vs Policing

RELATED READING

What’s in a Hat?

Back-end a Dead-end?

ASK ME ABOUT

COOL TOOL™ TOOLBOX TALKS – Topic: Checklists, Inspections and Audits”

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GM – Under the Knife

♦♦  CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Feb 2013
     

Under the Knife

World Class Safety: Health & Hygiene

Picture: operating theatre staff

     

I have “signed my life away” and I feel like doing a full audit of all the tools, equipment, labelling, but . . . . it’s too late. I am flat on my back on the hard, cold and narrow operating table at Linksfield Hospital.

There is something frightening, yet reassuring about these masked faces.

Frightening, because the doctors have literally got my life in their hands. Thoughts of: “What if . . . .” flash through my brain.

Reassuring, because I know that I can ‘rest assured’ that I am in the best hands, the hands of genuine professionals.

I try to stay alert as nurse Rebecca gives me some oxygen, “just to be safe . . . .” and hooks me up to the monitoring instruments. I see Dr van der Spuy inserting the ‘plastic’ needle of the drip. The last words I hear are “You will feel . . . .” I am asleep in an instant.

Back in the ward, after recovery, I feel so good that I have to pat for the plaster or bandage. Perfect pain control! I have time to think about my hospital stay.

I am sharing this story of my operation with you because a hospital is a prime example of World Class S.H.E. – SAFETY, HEALTH and ENVIRONMENT. I am not talking about a third world bush clinic here, but of a facility and standards we all should strive for in our own operations, be it a factory, plant, mine or office complex.

  • Highly skilled doctors and nursing staff, serious about their work and following strict procedures, without taking short cuts.
  • Non-negotiable rules, such as those regarding hygiene. No one would even contemplate entering the operating theater without a sterile gown, slippers, gloves and mouth guard. Protection (PPE) for both the patient and the medical staff!
  • Working together as a team. No fooling around or taking chances. Clear cut roles and responsibilities – surgeon, anaesthetist, theater nurse, ward sister, cleaner, with no room for error and a spotless environment.
  • Identification and labeling is taken dead seriously, down to a milligram for medication. Identitags and bar coding for the patient with full particulars like ward, bed, responsible doctor, planned procedure, and double checking everything with sign-off (my brother’s keeper), to avoid any misunderstanding.
  • Pre-admission (pre-start) check lists. The anaesthetist would not dream of putting a patient to sleep without a face-to-face examination.
  • Monitoring and record keeping of blood pressure, pulse, temperature, medication, without fail. This is all part of discipline and genuine patient care, including hand-over to the next shift and the following of “doctor’s orders”.
  • Continuous improvement (‘plastic’ needle), especially in procedures and equipment, is part of making it safer for the patient and thus improving SHE all round.

ACTION

My challenge to you:

Use this write up for your next couple of toolbox talks. Furthermore, use it as a model to audit your operation. Forget your existing safety checklists and standards for a moment. Think out of the box and utilize this write up as a wake-up call. Get your senior leadership to ask: “If our operation were a hospital in which we carried out procedures and people’s lives were at stake, what would we do differently, right NOW? How SERIOUS would we be about adhering to our own policies and procedures?”.

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SAFETY

Disruptive Safety™… from The Safety Rep’s Survival Guide

10 Tips to Kill the Silly Season

Auditing vs Policing (aka “The Best Audits”) … from the Culture & Safety Performance series

Peopology: The Key to Sustainable Safety Transformation … incorporating “I Have a Dream”   and the whY Factor

The sequel to I HAVE A DREAM - 5 Simply Smart Ideas on how to implement YOUR SAFETY DREAM.Your Safety Dream … How to implement “I Have a Dream”

The Power of Discipline in Safety

10 Myths About Safety

Crocodile’s Tale

The Safety Calendar … from the Do One (Safety) Thing Each Month series

Safety Vision and Strategy (incl. Safety Review Questions) … from the Culture & Safety Performance series

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PRODUCTS

Jurgen Tietz - COOL TOOL VOTE FOR SAFETY Process Overview documentCOOL TOOL™ VOTE FOR SAFETY™ Process – Overview

VUKA! VUSA! WAKE UP! RISE UP!™ Boot camp – Overview

COOL TOOL™ Toolbox Talks – About and Topics

COOL TOOL™ Toolbox Talks – Demo Module – Module C4 – Hands-Cuts

COOL TOOL™ Knock-out Safety Tips – Overview

COOL TOOL™ Safety Cookies: Ideas for recognising commitment to safety

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EVENTS

Jürgen Tietz: Health & Safety Speaker – Profile

Jürgen Tietz: Health & Safety Speaker – Brochure

Presentation Questionnaire: 10 Questions You Need To Answer

Organising a Safety Event: 10 Things You Need To Know

Organising a Safety Event: How to Get ‘Buns’ on Seats

Face on Safety Presentation: Photo Session Guidelines

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GENERAL

Time Management … from the Culture & Safety Performance series

New Leadership Role Checklist (New Job Checklist)

“When not to have a meeting” Checklist

Tools & Techniques for Effective Meetings … from the Culture & Safety Performance series

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Product Feedback

 

 

 

NO CONDOM NO COOKIE™ Goodie Box
DIY AIDS Awareness Product

Probably the best campaign in this regard I have ever seen. Jurgen Tietz is a star at connecting subjects to people in novel ways.

Bruce Mills, COO, Kaizen SHEQ

Thank you Jurgen for sharing with us the amazing work you do. The learning will sure stay with me.

Metse Mphelo

Thank you for the eye opener session.

Thoki Ndlovu

UJ Wellness Champions

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VOTE FOR SAFETY™ Campaign
DIY SAFETY™ Product Range

Ashley McLeod, Senior GM, Assmang Chrome, Machadodorp Works

Edwin Zimu, Safety Officer, Assmang Chrome, Machadodorp Works

Moses Jele, Chief Safety Election Officer, Assmang Chrome, Machadodorp Works

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DAILY SAFETY DOSE™

I have used your Daily Safety Dose™ tool on several occasions with specific reference to Process Safety hazards and the results were nothing less than awesome …

Chris Oosthuizen, Assistant Manager SHE: Process Safety

Petro Janse van Vuuren, Playing Mantis SA

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SAFETY KIT / TOOLBOX

We started to make use of the above product in 2009 with great success. We use it for our weekly Toolbox Talk sessions. The plant guys are very keen to join these sessions as we have lots of fun. Very good, and sometimes unusual ideas come from these discussions. We all look forward to the 30-40 minutes every week.

Thank you to Jurgen for this great product. I can honestly recommend it to any company planning to have fun while doing SHEQ Awareness.

Ilse Broodryk, QUESH Coordinator

These SHE Induction Kits are awesome … A definite winner and the ultimate induction trainer.

Our Trainer is thrilled about this COOL TOOL™ as it helps him to put the safety message across in simple terms to those who ‘push the buttons and use the tools’!

Thank you Jürgen, for a truly remarkable COOL TOOL™ which created a quantum leap in safety, not only for our newcomers, but for all our staff.

Nick Cavalieratos, HSEC Manager

I have added the Electrical tools to the toolbox, and give an example of an item and challenge the rest of the workshop to “better” my input on safety. I’m sure that with what you gave me and the toolbox, I’ll reach the “ZERO target” for the year.

Fred Behr, Hi Quality Electrical

I showed my wife the Toolbox and it has motivated her to be more safety conscious for herself and our little daughter. The Toolbox will definitely assist me, in fact it has already been of assistance with my safety talk on Friday. To take something practical and simple and draw so many ideas and comparisons out of it is astounding.

Dirk Visser, Omnia Fertilizer

Listen to how Willie Boshoff & Mac MacKenzie put the toolkit to work:

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SAFETY MAGAZINE

I took time to read the Magazine you gave to me from cover to cover – amazing safety tips there !!!

Nonhlanhla Dimba, Risk Specialist: Legal & Compliance

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SAFETY COOKIE

The safety cookies with the message were appreciated by all. Surely, safety is not about luck but is about doing things right the first time.

MS Jappie, Power Station Manager

Thank you for the excellent safety cookies we have received.

On the first of every month we hand out safety topics at the entrance to all shifts, and we used that opportunity to give the safety cookies to the people at the same time. … It was received very positively and people were very interested …

Burnstone Mine - queueing up for Jurgen's Safety Cookies

You can see it was a cold, wet morning, but people were queueing up to get their cookies.

Ragel Weyers

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COOL TOOL™ TOOLBOX TALKS

Literacy is a huge concern in SA … I have used your toolbox talks in KZN and it benefited us alot.

Letisha van den Berg, SHE Mgr

What a powerful, simple way of demonstrating how employees can change their behaviors towards safety. The content of the CD’s is not fiction, but the real things that happened and are still happening around us.

It is also a simple tool that I use for my safety meetings in my team and you will be amazed to see how the team reacts to some of the clips that have been professionally selected.

I would really recommend that any supervisor must own one of these toolbox.

Nelson Sipho Soka, Section Engineer

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BOOK: Life EduAction

Thank you very much for the gift of your book. … I really appreciate [it] and all the excellent work that you have done at our operations. As you probably know, I deal with hundreds of consultants and there is but a handful that understand / ascribe to the principle of good faith. It is a privilege to know somebody like you with whom one can interact and do business in good faith and trust.

Joe Schoeman, Div SHEQ Manager

If you really want perspective on how to deal with day to day issues and also want to enhance your self esteem & broaden your horizon I recommend you buy yourself this book. I won it in a competition and am halfway through it. The problem is that it is so ‘d*mn’ interesting that you can’t put it down. The references are also something you will not find easily.

Theo Fourie

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CHECKLISTS

NEW BUSINESS CHECKLIST

… [It] has proved to be a most useful tool in setting up my own business.

I found the list to be comprehensive and to the point, also touching on matters that are easily overlooked. Being a creative individual rather than a strategic thinker, following the list enabled me to framework my ideas and put together a workable business plan that was well structured and logical.

Your feedback and advice was crucial in fine-tuning the business plan and I truly appreciate your time and effort. I trust that my business will be a success and I’d like you to know that you have definitely played a fundamental part in accomplishing this.

Petra Bierberg, Petra Jewellery Design

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Value-Adding Segments and Products

 

 

 

Safety Clock

The SAFETY CLOCK

Safety never stops. Safety does not take a break / holiday. Safety continues around the clock.

The hand-out which accompanies this segment depicts 12 safety icons instead of the numbers on the face of the clock.

The icons and segment are based on the life saving / cardinal rules of the respective client.

 

 

SIMPLY SMART SAFETY Magazine

This personalised and custom-branded magazine contains a number of toolbox talks and other safety articles.

The front cover features the photo of an individual whom you want to recognise.

The editorial on the inside is a feature about the person – his/her achievement(s) and the reason(s) for the reward.

This novel and unique magazine is a most powerful tool for recognising achievement and motivating people.
It is a meaningful and educational gift that others will want the next time.

 

 

Vusi and Fred share lessons learnt

TALKING TO THE DEAD

This video is based on the fact that we often have to make assumptions about what really happened when an incident leads to a fatality!

This is an interactive video, with the presenter establishing a link to Fred and Vusi and speaking with them to find out the root cause which lead to their deaths. When Vusi and Fred share lessons learnt with us and what they would do differently if they had their life over again, the message is clear and unforgettable.

Check out the feedback on this powerful segment.

 

 

The SAFETY SONG

At most events we need to drum up energy and enthusiasm.

Music is an ideal tool, which fits in with our African culture of song and dance.

Originally composed by Alain d Woolf, the Safety Song is a customised, easy-to-sing-along song which can effectively be used to build up team spirit and a “brother’s/sister’s keeper” safety culture.


listen to snippets of the song
or
watch a live performance

 

 

watch the Safety Man video

The SAFETY MAN

This technique effectively demonstrates the many roles and responsibilities of the SHE Rep.

A number of props are ‘loaded on the shoulders’ of the SHE Rep to illustrate the workload, such as upholding standards, adhering to legislation, fixing and improving things, reporting incidents – near HITS, hazard identification and risk assessment, protecting the environment, fire prevention and first aid, motivating and encouraging … the list goes on and on.

Jurgen Tietz brings you Safety: by the people, for the people
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Disruptive Safety
The Safety Reps Survival Guide handbook