Search Results for: Year-end

SpEd_CA – Year-end Message (2016)


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✨✨✨   YEAR-END MESSAGE   ✨✨✨

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Dec 2016

Be Prepared

Picture: Year-end Call to Action

Thinking ahead to 2017

     

What is not started today is never finished tomorrow.

— Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Before you go on holiday or kick into holiday mode, make a short list of those things you would work on or complete this year if you had an extra month at your disposal.

Take this list and paste it on your whiteboard, notice board or some other place where you will see it when you get back. This is the list you should start working on right away in 2017.

Picture: Getting it done

Thank you for accompanying me on my journey through 2016.

I look forward to sharing 2017 with you … it’s going to be a year of change and growth and rocking the “safety boat”. Take care and stay safe until then.

May all the blessings of Christmas be yours (even if you don’t celebrate it) …
Jürgen & the eKhuluma team

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GM – Road Safety – A Year-End “Take Safety Home” Message 2 – Let’s Save Lives

♦♦♦    Road Safety    ♦♦♦

Year-End Take Safety Home Message #2

The problem of texting whilst driving is of such concern to me that I simply must send a plea for driver mindfulness, not only for year-end, but for every day!

Let’s Save Lives

It’s a toss-up, nowadays, as to which is the more important message: “Don’t Drink & Drive” or “Don’t Text & Drive” or should we now say “Don’t Drink & Text & Drive” ?

But, since the former is virtually a cliché these days, my plea revolves around cell phone usage whilst driving (which even sober drivers are inclined to do).

graphic of vidclip snapshot with link to vidclip You may have already heard of or watched this documentary, “From One Second To The Next” by Werner Herzog. It’s about texting and driving. But if you haven’t seen it, it’s worth checking out. The documentary is well done and drives home in a personal way the pain and anguish texting and driving can cause.
graphic of vidclip snapshot with link to vidclip Mobile (cell phone) use is now the leading cause of death behind the wheel.

ACTION

Organise safety sessions to be held just before the majority of personnel take to the roads for their year-end break. Show them the video clips and hand out Road Safety Cookies to bring the message home.

RELATED MATERIAL

Road Safety – Year-End “Take Safety Home” Message
Manslaughter or murder?

ON OFFER

Road Safety Cookies

graphic of Road Safety Cookie with stop road sign

Unusual (and tasty) handouts to bring the Road Safety message home to your personnel and their families. They are branded with road safety signs and the cookie inserts contain road safety messages. They can be customised to suit your needs. One idea is to make up a small parcel of Road Safety cookies for each employee to “Take Safety Home” for the holidays.Road Safety Cookies™ have been specifically branded with road safety signs and the cookie inserts are road safety messages.
There are many ways to use this COOL TOOL™.

FEEDBACK

As always, I welcome your comments and feedback!

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GM – Road Safety – Year-End “Take Safety Home” Message

♦♦♦    Road Safety    ♦♦♦

Year-End Take Safety Home Message

Those of you who have been following me for some time know how passionate I am about this topic. We kill nearly ten times more people on our roads each year than ALL industrial fatalities combined in all workplaces. Chances are that if you are going to lose someone over the holiday season, it will be on the roads. This is not only via vehicle accidents – pedestrian fatalities account for approximately 40% of road-related deaths.

graphic of ambulance with money

We are able to release last year’s crime statistics in the greatest of detail so the SAPS can plan and focus on the right hot spots. But, in spite of substantial funding, the Department of Transports Road Traffic Management Corporation is unable to provide road accident statistics, because they are “reengineering the Road Traffic information collection process”. In terms of road safety, we are effectively flying blind. I cannot give you the exact figure, but I can tell you that the cost of road accidents runs into billions – we could easily build and maintain our road infrastructure if we could halve our accidents.

We all know that we cannot improve something which we are not measuring and the latest road traffic data is from 2011! We can be as concerned as we like about the current situation, but we can only influence what is within our control. Therefore, let us influence our employees to become ACTIVE SAFE road users.

There are three things which kill people on the roads ( F S D )

The first is FATIGUE. If people are tired and take their eyes off the road, the likelihood of accidents shoots up dramatically. Thus encourage the habit of taking a break and getting enough sleep before a road trip.

SPEED is the second killer. Speed reduces the opportunity to react to any unforeseen event and stay in control!

DRINKING (Drugs) is the third killer. Alcohol has a disastrous effect on your reaction time as well as staying awake and alert.

ACTION

1. Draw up your plan for the year-end now! Involve your SHE Reps in that planning – empower them to play an ACTIVE role in implementing some of the ideas below, as well as coming up with their own suggestions.
2. Road Safety Cookie
  graphic of ambulance with money This is a small hand-out to engage ALL your employees in road safety and to remind them to take a safety attitude with them when going home for the holidays.
These Road Safety Cookies™ have been specifically branded with road safety signs and the cookie inserts are road safety messages.
There are many ways to use this COOL TOOL™.
  One idea is to put the name(s) of employees killed during the year in road accidents on the back of the cookie inserts eg. + IN MEMORY OF +
I will assist you with customisation to meet your specific needs.
More ideas
on how to use the Safety Cookies here.
3. Road Safety Toolbox Talks. I am offering this series of 6 CD’s at a special discount of R2,750. These CD’s are part of my COOL TOOL™ Toolbox Talks and cover the Road Safety Topics of Seat Belts, Attitude, Road Signs, Pedestrians and vehicles – download the overview.
3. Advanced Driving Safety Rules. Get your SHE Reps to hand out a leaflet, with advanced driving tips, to everyone leaving your premises when taking their year-end break.
If you need ideas for this, send me an email.
4. Look at activities you can sponsor at schools in your neighbourhood, for example driving lessons or driving simulators for schools.

RELATED MATERIAL

A Hong Kong movie theatre asks its patrons to leave their cell phones ON when they enter the movie house. Using that, Volkswagen made an eye opening advertisement.

Have you been tagged?
Caught at a road block
Taking your eye off the ball / road / task
Walking the circle of safety
Safety misconceptions – what we can learn from them
Manslaughter or murder?

REFERENCE MATERIAL

  • RTMC latest annual report is 2012- 2013. (If you look at Section 8, in particular the part which reviews the achievement of their strategic objective “improve collection of data” on page 56, you will find that they did not achieve KPI 32 = State of Road Safety Report. The financials are in Section 9 on page 71.)
  • Arrive Alive has no up to date info either – last report is 2011.

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GM – Walking the Circle of Safety

♦♦♦  VEHICLE & CHILD SAFETY  ♦♦♦
May 2012
     

Walking the Circle of Safety

Picture depicting walking vehicular circle of safety

     

What is the Vehicular Circle of Safety?

Pretty much what it sounds like … circling your vehicle as a safety check before you drive off.

The ‘Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety’ website has a comprehensive checklist and a diagram of what to check for. Although it is directed at company vehicles, the Circle of Safety is definitely not limited to that – we all learnt about the circle check when we prepared for our driver licence tests. Ergo, this is something we should all be doing with our personal vehicles too!

Why do it?

Well, apart from the obvious, i.e. is the vehicle in a fit state to be on the road, doing this has the effect of increasing driver safety awareness. Some companies insist on the positioning of traffic cones around their vehicles so that drivers are ‘forced’ to ‘walk the circle’ as they remove the cones.

The example below is a VERY good reason for at least checking that there are no children or animals anywhere near your vehicle.

Source unknown, but thanks to Morkel for bringing it to my attention!

If you’re not already walking the Circle of Safety, why not start today? It’s the SMART thing to do.

RELATED READING

Childsafewebsite for the campaign of the Child Accident Prevention Foundation of Southern Africa (CAPFSA) and Safe Kids Worldwide

Driveway Run-over Injury Prevention Videosmade available by the New Zealand chapter of Safekids

Prediction on child road fatalities in Africa by 2015

ESSENTIAL LINKS

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SCnSP – Safety Is Not A Game

♦♦  SAFETY CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦
Jul 2016
     

Safety Is Not A Game

How are you pushing safety?

Picture: Give a thumbs up or pat on the back for a job well done

     

Work, especially in terms of safety, should not be seen as a game, with the key components of goals, rules, challenges, interaction and with mostly luck as a basis to create fun.

Unfortunately, I still see many, many companies treat safety that way. They run competitions and use safety results as if safety performance were a race with records to be broken. They hold year-end functions congratulating the winners, holding up the best of this and the best of that. The perceived implication, of course, is that all others are losers, although it is never put that way.

Companies need to look at the types of safety incentives they use and the unspoken message this sends to their people. To me, the most powerful way to motivatestimulate and inspire safe behaviour is by recognition and prompt feedback.

Establish a culture of ongoing recognition and incentives, not once a year or only when records are broken or only for the b-i-g achievements. The “green card” technique gives recognition, immediately, to the person observed doing the right and safe thing. Be VFL’s (Visible Felt Leaders) by making recognition visible and felt now, not later!

Keep a close eye on what is motivating you to give recognition – there’s a fine line between appreciation and manipulation and people are able to pick up really quickly on false praise.

ACTION

Giving recognition isn’t complicated and yet it is so powerful as it helps to create a motivating climate, but it does take time and effort:

  • Establish ownership.
  • Find at least one person you can give recognition to on each of your walkabouts, by searching for things done right or well.
  • Tell that person what they did right and that it has been noticed.
  • Encourage that person to keep up the good work.
  • Do it in the presence of the co-workers and supervisor.

RELATED READING

Your Safety Monument

How to Implement Your Safety Dream

Lessons From Cats

The Power of Gold

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SCnSP – Illusion/Paradox of Control

♦♦  SAFETY CULTURE   &   SAFETY PERFORMANCE  ♦♦

In this series, I share with you my thoughts on Why Safety Is An Issue For Most Companies and the Things We Must Address If We Want To Improve Our Safety Performance. It’s time we re-examine the “power to influence” (control) as opposed to the “capacity to have an effect on” (influence) with respect to Safety Behaviour.

The Illusion / Paradox of Control

(Are we in control of Safety Behaviour?)

Illusion and Paradox of Control text as a graphic

I have written about this before – the issue of control and influence. It is such an important aspect of our work in safety that, when I read Seth Godin’s post[1] on the subject, it stimulated me to put a safety spin on what he wrote.

We have this “idea that we are in control“, that through policies and procedures we can ensure zero harm. It drives our Safety Management efforts. It fuels our “compelling belief” that this year we will reach our safety targets. It opens the door to consultants who try to convince us that if we just use their system, we’ll get exactly the silver bullet we have been looking for.

It’s like we’re setting ourselves up for disappointment. I mean, the reality is that “we’re never in control, not of anything“. Instead, we should strive to view all our efforts as a means to try to influence safe behaviours. As in the “service business“, this is “a tough sell” for the safety professional.

Seth ends his post with these punchlines:

  • When the illusion of control collides with the reality of influence, it highlights the fable the entire illusion is based on.
  • and
  • You’re responsible for what you do, but you don’t have authority and control over the outcome. We can hide from that, or we can embrace it.

I would like to end my post with these thoughts:

  • Control contains a peculiar paradox. The more you impose control, the less control you have, because it removes accountability from someone who should own the responsibility in the first place. [2]
  • and
  • When you no longer push the buttons or use the tools, you should become a servant to those who do! [3]

ACTION

Think about what you do.

How much of what you and your team of safety professionals do is:

  • Tell, command, prescribe, lay down the rules / policy / procedures, set the standards, …
  • Audit / police against the above.
  • Collect, report on information to justify what already has happened.
  • Reactive to incidents, accidents, near hits (misses), short cuts, …
  • Sitting in your office behind a desk.

Or are you

  • Embracing the reality of influencing with trust and integrity.
  • Listening, supporting, helping, caring, recognising, respecting, empowering those you serve.
  • Encouraging them to take responsibility for their own safety at work and at home.

[1]  “The Illusion of Control“, by Seth Godin

[2]  from “Beyond Management“, by Etsko Schuitema

[3]  from “Life EduAction“, by Jürgen Tietz

RELATED READING

“Year-End Take Safety Home Message”

“Influence of Frontline Personnel”

“Your Safety Dream”

“People”

“Safety as a Value”

“Fire! Fire! Fire!”

“Ukuhlanya”

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GM – Out of the Blue

♦♦♦   ROAD SAFETY   ♦♦♦

Out of the Blue

accidents are caused

I have been preaching: “Accidents don’t just happen – they are caused by someone choosing to do the wrong thing or choosing not to do the right thing“. This could be via design, maintenance, use, disposal, or an outright, deliberate choice to break the rules or to take a short cut.

But, what if you are the victim of such action, an innocent passer-by, in the wrong place at the wrong time? Here is a story of a young couple on holiday in the USA:

“Tonight we had a really, really close shave. I was driving and we’d just pulled up to a petrol station, when, I kid you not, literally a few seconds later, an out of control car came hurtling out of nowhere from the intersection, smashing us into the petrol station pump. The driver, it later turns out, was very high, drunk and out of his mind. Some very nice gentlemen from the Louisiana State Troopers got hold of and arrested him a bit later.

We got out of the car ok. Jess, being on the passenger side, is a lot more bruised than I am, but luckily no battery sparks or the like and luckily the pump’s fail-safe kicked in and the flow of petrol, except that from our car’s tank, was automatically cut off immediately.

It was very close though … the terror of having yourself and your wife slammed into a petrol pump by an oncoming car. Also, I can now fairly confidently say, never rent the cheapest cars that are short a safety feature, airbag or reinforced side door here or there; and please award a Nobel Prize for the person who invented side airbags.”

Photo showing the vehicle smashed into the fuel pump at the gas station

Accidents happen every day. The reason this particular accident touched me deeply is because the young people involved are my son and his wife.

As with so many road accidents, natural disasters / events or crime incidents, they can (and do) happen anytime, anywhere, to anyone, for no reason at all. There is little that the ‘victim’ can do about it. Well, let me rephrase that: there is little the ‘victim’ can do about preventing the random event.

You can, however, take pro-active measures to minimise the impact of an incident and the ‘luck factor’ [1]. Unfortunately, unless you’re with the Navy Seals or have access to sophisticated behaviour modification training, there is little effective training to deal with being a victim of such an event. Thinking and being aware are your best defences. Of course, there is no fail proof solution, but here are a few things we all, as individuals, can do:

ACTION

  • Think about ‘What If’ scenarios, the consequences and what you can do to minimise the risk should any of those scenarios materialise.
  • Look at your ‘Near Hits’. Ask what happened, why it happened (dig down by repeating this question a number of times) and, most importantly, what you can do to prevent it from happening again – or at least to reduce the damage or injuries.
  • Be alert to your surroundings and actions. Use the traffic light rules:
    • Be aware of your green = safe situations, like being at home and relaxing in a safe environment.
    • When leaving home and getting onto the roads your awareness level should change to amber = pay attention, slow down and look for possible danger.
    • When drawing money at an ATM or approaching a hijacking hot-spot or in a crowded area, you should be at a red level of awareness = eyes in the back of your head.
  • Don’t be merely a ‘passenger’ – speak up when you see someone taking a chance or breaking the rules, like going down the killer road of F-S-D = FATIGUE-SPEED-DEVIATION (including drink / drugs).  
    “The mirror we hold up to the person next to us is one of the most important pictures he / she will ever see.”
    — Seth Godin
  • When buying or renting or merely borrowing someone else’s stuff, consider the safety features of that piece of equipment – guarding, trips and fuses, alarms, isolation features, air bags, etc.

In a future safety tip, I will deal with due diligence, HIRA and the topic of building safety into the design of plant and equipment.

 

[1]  Luck and safety don’t belong in the same equation. You cannot drive your safety efforts by relying on luck.

RELATED MATERIAL

Taking your eye off the ball / road / task

It’s My Mistake

Road Safety – Take Safety Home

Walking the Circle of Safety

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GM Are you serious about safety at home?

♦♦♦     HOME SAFETY     ♦♦♦

ARE YOU SERIOUS ABOUT SAFETY AT HOME?

THE ISSUE

95% of employees do not take safety home and / or take safety at home seriously. This includes road safety.

PROBABLE CAUSES

  • Employees’ attitude towards safety is a “consequence” attitude, i.e.
    I  ‘GOTO’  instead of  I  ‘WANTO’  do safety – because I believe it is the right thing to do.
  • Employees see safety as an issue that concerns them only when at work. Once they leave the factory / mine gate, different safety standards kick in.
  • Companies spend virtually no money and effort on home safety, i.e. % of safety budget spent directly on improving safety outside the gate = ZERO.
  • We – the employer and employees – don’t have time and / or money, and / or …    the list goes on and on.

What I want to know is: What are your thoughts on this subject?

QUESTIONS

  1. How important is home safety / take home safety in your company’s overall safety strategy? (Rate as Critical / Very Important / Important / Unimportant / Irrelevant)
  2. What percentage of your company’s safety budget is spent directly on home safety / taking safety home, which includes road safety in general (but not inside company premises)?
  3. What products or hand-outs is / has your company been giving all its employees in order to improve their home safety / take home safety?
  4. What ideas / suggestions / best practices do you have for improving home safety / take home safety?

Submit your answers here.

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e-Publications

Safety-Related Articles & Information by Jürgen

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Series: CURRENT AFFAIRS & EVENTS and SAFETY

Highlighting the Safety Lessons one can learn from current affairs and during commemorative events.

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Series: TAKE SAFETY HOME

A collection of Simply Smart Safety Tips focusing on keeping our personnel, families and communities safe.

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Series: CULTURE & SAFETY PERFORMANCE

In this series I share with you my thoughts on ‘Why Safety is an Issue for Most Companies’, or, putting it differently, ‘Things we Must Address if we Want to Improve our Safety Performance’.

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Series: DO ONE (SAFETY) THING EACH MONTH

This series aims to help safety practitioners and company leadership to increase safety awareness amongst personnel. It’s based on the concept that if you do just one thing a month to change the safety mind-set, in one year you will have done 12 things to raise safety awareness.

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Series: SAFETY ON A SHOESTRING BUDGET – The 10 P’s

The purpose of this series is to give struggling-but-eager SHE professionals and practitioners, who are working for financially-constrained companies, pointers on how to get the safety awareness message across to both management and workers, on a shoestring budget.

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Series: SAFETY MATTERS

A collection of  Simply Smart Safety Tips  covering a range of safety-related topics.

 

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“Excerpted from Jürgen Tietz’ Simply Smart Safety!™ Tips
available from the S.H.E. ATM at www.jurgentietz.co.za”

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